Judge Hardy and Son


1h 27m 1939
Judge Hardy and Son

Brief Synopsis

A small-town judge tries to save an elderly couple from eviction while coping with his wife's illness.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Release Date
Dec 22, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Aurania Rouverol.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

Touched by the plight of the Volduzzis, an elderly destitute couple who are in danger of losing their house, Judge James Hardy agrees to look into their case. Sensing that the Volduzzis might have a daughter who could provide them financial support, the judge enlists Andy's help in locating her. Andy, who is desperately in need of money to fix his jalopy in time to take Polly Benedict to the Fourth of July fireworks, eagerly accepts his father's offer of a reward and begins to interview the girls in his school with the middle initial V. His search leads him to the Horton estate, where he meets daughter Elvie, who is writing an essay on Alexander Hamilton for a Fourth of July competition. After learning about the competition's fifty dollar prize, Andy decides to enter the contest himself, and begins to charge flowers, clothes and tires against his anticipated winnings. When he then discovers that the cash prize is only offered to girls, Andy convinces Euphrasia Clark to enter his essay in her name. Andy's plan backfires, however, when Euphrasia threatens to use his proposal to blackmail him into taking her to the fireworks show. Andy's girl and money problems pale when his mother becomes seriously ill with pneumonia. The family is brought closer together while they await the doctor's prognosis, and after a harrowing night, Mrs. Hardy recovers. Relieved, Andy pays another visit to Elvie, who confesses that she hates her mother and wants to win the essay contest for her own self-respect. When Andy offers her the best part of his essay, Elvie tells him that her mother's maiden name was Volduzzi. Armed with this piece of information, Judge Hardy pays Mrs. Horton a visit and learns that the frightened woman is ashamed of what her new husband will think of her immigrant parents. The judge counsels Mrs. Horton to confess all to her husband and reconcile with her parents, and she agrees to do so. All ends happily as the judge offers to help Andy with his debts, and a grateful Elvie lends Andy her limousine to take Polly to the fireworks show.

Photo Collections

Judge Hardy and Son - Scene Stills
Here are a few scene stills from MGM's Judge Hardy and Son (1939), starring Mickey Rooney and Lewis Stone.
Judge Hardy and Son - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for MGM's Judge Hardy and Son (1939). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Release Date
Dec 22, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Aurania Rouverol.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Articles

Judge Hardy and Son


Judge Hardy and Son (1939) was the eighth release in MGM's highly profitable Andy Hardy series. The first film, A Family Affair (1937), was followed by 15 more Andy Hardy adventures over the next 20 years. The credited director of this segment in the life of the Hardy family is George B. Seitz, who oversaw eleven installments of the series. MGM studio chief Louis B. Mayer, who was a sucker for sentimental films about families, was the most important fan of the series. Not only did he run the studio that made Andy Hardy possible, he took a very personal role in the production of each film. This was a rather odd situation, since Judge Hardy and Son and the other episodes were strictly B-movie productions, hardly important enough to attract L.B. Mayer as their patron saint.

In one telling episode, screenwriter Carey Wilson was laboring on the script for Judge Hardy and Son, when Mayer burst into his office with the pages of Andy's emotional prayer scene for his mother who is hovering near death. Deeply unhappy with the scene as written, Mayer sharply criticized Wilson by saying, "You see, you're now a Hollywood character. You've forgotten your simple, honest boyhood. You don't remember how a real boy would pray. This is how a boy would do it." With that, Mayer dropped to his knees, lifted his hands and eyes up high, and said fervently, "Dear God, please don't let my mom die, because she's the best mom in the world. Thank you, God." The Mayer performance, complete with streaming tears down the cheek, went into the film verbatim and became the standard invocation to the divine in all subsequent studio films under Mayer.

Director: George B. Seitz
Producer: Lou L. Ostrow (uncredited)
Screenplay: Carey Wilson
Cinematography: Lester White
Editor: Ben Lewis
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons
Music: David Snell
Cast: Mickey Rooney ('Andy' Hardy), Lewis Stone (Judge James Hardy), Fay Holden (Mrs. Emily Hardy), Cecilia Parker (Marian Hardy), Ann Rutherford (Polly Benedict).
BW-90m.

By Scott McGee
Judge Hardy And Son

Judge Hardy and Son

Judge Hardy and Son (1939) was the eighth release in MGM's highly profitable Andy Hardy series. The first film, A Family Affair (1937), was followed by 15 more Andy Hardy adventures over the next 20 years. The credited director of this segment in the life of the Hardy family is George B. Seitz, who oversaw eleven installments of the series. MGM studio chief Louis B. Mayer, who was a sucker for sentimental films about families, was the most important fan of the series. Not only did he run the studio that made Andy Hardy possible, he took a very personal role in the production of each film. This was a rather odd situation, since Judge Hardy and Son and the other episodes were strictly B-movie productions, hardly important enough to attract L.B. Mayer as their patron saint. In one telling episode, screenwriter Carey Wilson was laboring on the script for Judge Hardy and Son, when Mayer burst into his office with the pages of Andy's emotional prayer scene for his mother who is hovering near death. Deeply unhappy with the scene as written, Mayer sharply criticized Wilson by saying, "You see, you're now a Hollywood character. You've forgotten your simple, honest boyhood. You don't remember how a real boy would pray. This is how a boy would do it." With that, Mayer dropped to his knees, lifted his hands and eyes up high, and said fervently, "Dear God, please don't let my mom die, because she's the best mom in the world. Thank you, God." The Mayer performance, complete with streaming tears down the cheek, went into the film verbatim and became the standard invocation to the divine in all subsequent studio films under Mayer. Director: George B. Seitz Producer: Lou L. Ostrow (uncredited) Screenplay: Carey Wilson Cinematography: Lester White Editor: Ben Lewis Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons Music: David Snell Cast: Mickey Rooney ('Andy' Hardy), Lewis Stone (Judge James Hardy), Fay Holden (Mrs. Emily Hardy), Cecilia Parker (Marian Hardy), Ann Rutherford (Polly Benedict). BW-90m. By Scott McGee

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The CBCS incorrectly credits Brandon Tynan with the role of Dr. Jones; that role was actually played by Henry Hull. For additional information about the series, consult the Series Index and see A Family Affair in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.1269.