Snow Job


1h 30m 1972
Snow Job

Brief Synopsis

A skiing instructor plots to rob the resort at which he works.

Film Details

Also Known As
Schuss, The Great Ski Caper
Genre
Crime
Release Date
Feb 1972
Premiere Information
New York and Los Angeles openings: 2 Feb 1972
Production Company
Englund-Rissien Productions
Distribution Company
Warner Bros., Inc.
Country
Switzerland and United States
Location
Zermatt, Switzerland; Cervinia, Italy
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "$125,000 Ski Bum Hold-Up" by Richard Gallagher, published in Stag Magazine (Dec 1969).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In the Alpine town of Cervinia, Italy, ski shop manager Christian Biton plots to rob a local resort bank of its $250,000 payday. He enlists the help of two other expert skiers: his wealthy, bored girl friend Monica Scotti, and instructor Bob Skinner, who needs enough money to return to America. For weeks, while Monica flirts with the resort manager in order to glean information about the bank, the men rehearse the intricate and dangerous skiing skills necessary to carry off the robbery. Christian repeatedly navigates a treacherous virgin glacier, while Bob jumps a mountain chasm in a snowmobile. When they feel prepared, the trio ambush the van carrying the money, ski into the mountains and bury the cash, planning to let it sit until the following spring, when they can retrieve it without attracting attention. Soonafter they celebrate their victory, an insurance company representative, Enrico Dolphi, begins an investigation that leads him to the trio. Discerning their plot, he threatens them with arrest unless they reveal the whereabouts of the money. Forced to acquiesce, they watch in horror as Dolphi steals the money and flees. The three agree to go their separate ways, but Christian boards a train where Dolphi, who has been his secret accomplice all along, happily awaits him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Schuss, The Great Ski Caper
Genre
Crime
Release Date
Feb 1972
Premiere Information
New York and Los Angeles openings: 2 Feb 1972
Production Company
Englund-Rissien Productions
Distribution Company
Warner Bros., Inc.
Country
Switzerland and United States
Location
Zermatt, Switzerland; Cervinia, Italy
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "$125,000 Ski Bum Hold-Up" by Richard Gallagher, published in Stag Magazine (Dec 1969).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Snow Job -


A crime caper on skis, Snow Job stars French Olympic medal-winning skier Jean-Claude Killy as a ski instructor who masterminds a heist at an Italian resort with the help of his girlfriend and another instructor. The film follows the planning and execution of the robbery, which they pull off successfully. But there are a few more twists to the plot, thanks to a canny insurance investigator played by Vittorio de Sica.

Killy made Olympic history in 1968 by becoming only the second male skier to win gold medals in three alpine events. He grew up in the French ski resort village of Val d'Isere, in the French Alps, and dropped out of school at age fifteen to focus on skiing. Killy won his first race at eighteen and competed in the 1964 Olympics, but did poorly because of illness. By 1968, he had won several prestigious races, including the World Cup, and his performance at the Olympics was the pinnacle of his ski career. Shortly thereafter, he retired from competition. Brash, ambitious and movie-star handsome, Killy concentrated on his business interests, had a brief career as a race car driver, and appeared in television commercials. Inevitably, he was courted by movie producers, and in 1972, he made his film debut in Snow Job, which was filmed on location Cervinia, Italy and Zermatt, Switzerland in the spring of 1971. The spectacularly-photographed skiing sequences were shot by former German skier turned cinematographer Willy Bogner. A Variety article described how Bogner filmed some of glacier sequences by skiing backwards with a handheld camera, and other panoramic scenes were shot from a helicopter.

Those sequences are the best in the film, and Killy is superb in them. But when he takes off the skis, his limitations as an actor are painfully evident. As a reviewer in Time magazine wrote, "Waxing romantic or working out plans for an elaborate robbery, Jean-Claude always manages to sound as if he were making a half-hearted pitch for Chap Stick." According to an article in the Hollywood Reporter, actress Cloris Leachman, wife of the film's director George Englund, dubbed co-star Daniele Gaubert's voice in the English-language version of Snow Job. Gaubert, an established French star, met Killy in late 1968 and they had been a couple ever since. They married in 1973, and after making Snow Job she retired from the screen to raise their family. The marriage lasted until Gaubert's death from cancer in 1987.

Reviews for Snow Job praised the skiing sequences, but not much else. New York Times critic Roger Greenspun wrote, "Asking this cast to do drama, even melodrama, is a little like having, say, the cast of Endless Summer play King Lear." The one exception, according to Greenspun, is the great Vittorio de Sica. "De Sica's part is pure hogwash, and he himself brings much of the ham to it. But he is so beautiful, and so marvelously, joyously phony, and he has such a trick of turning everyone else's fixed grin into a kind of maniacal laughter--that despite the sun and the snow and the skies, he almost persuades us we are at the movies."

Snow Job was not a box office success, and Killy, who always wanted to be the best at whatever he attempted, never made another feature film. That drive for perfection also led him to give up skiing soon after. He later took up snowboarding, and remained involved with the Olympics, most recently as the chief supervisor the Sochi games in 2014.

Director: George Englund
Producer: Edward L. Rissien
Screenplay: Ken Kolb, Jeffrey Bloom
Cinematography: Gabor Pogany, Willy Bogner
Editor: Gary Griffen
Costume Design: Bona Nasalli-Rocca
Art Direction: Aurelio Crugnolla
Music: Jacques Lussier
Principal Cast: Jean-Claude Killy (Christian Biton), Daniele Gaubert (Monica Scotti), Cliff Potts (Bob Skinner), Vittorio de Sica (Enrico Dolphi), Lelio Luttazzi (Simonelli), Delia Boccardo (Lorraine Borman), Umberto D'Orsi (Vito)
90 minutes

by Margarita Landazuri
Snow Job -

Snow Job -

A crime caper on skis, Snow Job stars French Olympic medal-winning skier Jean-Claude Killy as a ski instructor who masterminds a heist at an Italian resort with the help of his girlfriend and another instructor. The film follows the planning and execution of the robbery, which they pull off successfully. But there are a few more twists to the plot, thanks to a canny insurance investigator played by Vittorio de Sica. Killy made Olympic history in 1968 by becoming only the second male skier to win gold medals in three alpine events. He grew up in the French ski resort village of Val d'Isere, in the French Alps, and dropped out of school at age fifteen to focus on skiing. Killy won his first race at eighteen and competed in the 1964 Olympics, but did poorly because of illness. By 1968, he had won several prestigious races, including the World Cup, and his performance at the Olympics was the pinnacle of his ski career. Shortly thereafter, he retired from competition. Brash, ambitious and movie-star handsome, Killy concentrated on his business interests, had a brief career as a race car driver, and appeared in television commercials. Inevitably, he was courted by movie producers, and in 1972, he made his film debut in Snow Job, which was filmed on location Cervinia, Italy and Zermatt, Switzerland in the spring of 1971. The spectacularly-photographed skiing sequences were shot by former German skier turned cinematographer Willy Bogner. A Variety article described how Bogner filmed some of glacier sequences by skiing backwards with a handheld camera, and other panoramic scenes were shot from a helicopter. Those sequences are the best in the film, and Killy is superb in them. But when he takes off the skis, his limitations as an actor are painfully evident. As a reviewer in Time magazine wrote, "Waxing romantic or working out plans for an elaborate robbery, Jean-Claude always manages to sound as if he were making a half-hearted pitch for Chap Stick." According to an article in the Hollywood Reporter, actress Cloris Leachman, wife of the film's director George Englund, dubbed co-star Daniele Gaubert's voice in the English-language version of Snow Job. Gaubert, an established French star, met Killy in late 1968 and they had been a couple ever since. They married in 1973, and after making Snow Job she retired from the screen to raise their family. The marriage lasted until Gaubert's death from cancer in 1987. Reviews for Snow Job praised the skiing sequences, but not much else. New York Times critic Roger Greenspun wrote, "Asking this cast to do drama, even melodrama, is a little like having, say, the cast of Endless Summer play King Lear." The one exception, according to Greenspun, is the great Vittorio de Sica. "De Sica's part is pure hogwash, and he himself brings much of the ham to it. But he is so beautiful, and so marvelously, joyously phony, and he has such a trick of turning everyone else's fixed grin into a kind of maniacal laughter--that despite the sun and the snow and the skies, he almost persuades us we are at the movies." Snow Job was not a box office success, and Killy, who always wanted to be the best at whatever he attempted, never made another feature film. That drive for perfection also led him to give up skiing soon after. He later took up snowboarding, and remained involved with the Olympics, most recently as the chief supervisor the Sochi games in 2014. Director: George Englund Producer: Edward L. Rissien Screenplay: Ken Kolb, Jeffrey Bloom Cinematography: Gabor Pogany, Willy Bogner Editor: Gary Griffen Costume Design: Bona Nasalli-Rocca Art Direction: Aurelio Crugnolla Music: Jacques Lussier Principal Cast: Jean-Claude Killy (Christian Biton), Daniele Gaubert (Monica Scotti), Cliff Potts (Bob Skinner), Vittorio de Sica (Enrico Dolphi), Lelio Luttazzi (Simonelli), Delia Boccardo (Lorraine Borman), Umberto D'Orsi (Vito) 90 minutes by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of the film were Schuss and The Great Ski Caper. As noted in press materials for this unviewed film, the end credits include the statement: "All of Jean-Claude Killy's skiing was done by himself." The Hollywood Reporter review made special note of the film's "elegant" opening credits, which it described as panning slowly over polished skis and boots that appear to be suspended in a void.
       According to the Hollywood Reporter review, Snow Job was chosen specifically to display the talents of French skiing star Jean-Claude Killy, a triple gold medal winner at the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble, France. Snow Job marked his only major feature film appearance, and his only dramatic role. Daniele Gaubert was Killy's real-life girl friend until her death in 1987. As noted in contemporary sources, the film was shot on location in Cervinia, Italy and Zermatt, Switzerland. A June 1971 Variety article on the making of the film noted that ski scene cinematographer Willy Bogner filmed some of the dangerous glacier scenes while skiing backward and holding a hand-held camera.
       Although a Los Angeles Times article stated in January 1972 that Cloris Leachman had dubbed over Gaubert's voice for the role of "Monica Scotti," because the picture was unviewed and no other source mentions Leachman, it has not been determined whether Gaubert's or Leachman's voice was heard in the released film. Modern sources add Gigi Ballista and Giancarlo Prete to the cast. Although the June 1971 Variety article stated that the film would have its premiere at the Brackenridge Ski Community in Colorado, no record of that screening has been located.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1972

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1972