The Rescuers


1h 17m 1977

Brief Synopsis

Bernard and Bianca, of the Rescue Aid Society (a mouse organization) receive a message in a bottle from an orphaned girl who appears to have been kidnapped by Madame Medusa, a selfish woman who has no qualms about using children for her own purposes. The two mice go off to Devil's Bayou to attempt to rescue the little girl.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bernard och Bianca, Rescuers, aventures de Bernard et Bianca, reddertjes
MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Family
Release Date
1977
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Company; Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.66 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Synopsis

The Rescue Aid Society is an organization of mice who work out of New York and travel the world doing good deeds. When the police cannot find a little girl who has been kidnapped in the bayou, two mice named Bernard and Miss Bianca are on the case, enlisting the help of local animals to rescue the child.

Crew

Kenneth Anderson

Story By

Kenneth Anderson

From Story

Dale Baer

Animator

Ted Berman

Story By

Ted Berman

From Story

Daniela Bielecka

Other

Don Bluth

Animation Director

Jack Buckley

Animator

Artie Butler

Music

Ron Clements

Animator

Larry Clemmons

Story By

Larry Clemmons

From Story

Jim Coleman

Other

Carol Connors

Song

Robert Crawford

Song

Leroy Cross

Effects Assistant

Guy Deel

Layout Artist

Albert Dempster

Color

Sammy Fain

Song

Shelby Flint

Song Performer

Andy Gaskill

Animator

James L George

Animator

Vance Gerry

Story By

Vance Gerry

From Story

Gary Goldman

Animator

Stan Green

Effects Assistant

Don Griffith

Art Director

Ann Guenther

Other

Bill Hajee

Animator

Joe Hale

Layout Artist

Chuck Harvey

Animator

Harry Hester

Effects Assistant

Oliver M. Johnston Jr.

Animation Director

Glen Keane

Animator

Ted Kierscey

Animator

Jim Koford

Editor

Dorse A Lanpher

Animator

Eric Larson

Titles

Tom Lay

Layout Artist

Dick N Lucas

Animator

Fred Lucky

From Story

Fred Lucky

Story By

Burny Mattinson

From Story

Burny Mattinson

Titles

Burny Mattinson

Story By

Bob Mccrea

Animator

James Melton

Editor

Dave Michener

Story By

Dave Michener

From Story

Ron Miller

Executive Producer

Cliff Nordberg

Animator

Dale Oliver

Effects Assistant

Jeff Patch

Assistant Director

John Pomeroy

Animator

Wolfgang Reitherman

Producer

Richard Rich

Assistant Director

Ayn Robbins

Song

Sylvia Roemer

Layout Artist

Dick Sebast

From Story

Dick Sebast

Story By

Margery Sharp

Source Material (From Novel)

Melvin Shaw

Titles

Walt Stanchfield

Effects Assistant

Art Stevens

Animator

Dave Suding

Effects Assistant

Herb Taylor

Sound

Frank Thomas

Story By

Frank Thomas

From Story

Frank Thomas

Animation Director

Chuck Williams

Effects Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Bernard och Bianca, Rescuers, aventures de Bernard et Bianca, reddertjes
MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Family
Release Date
1977
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Company; Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.66 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1977

Articles

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)


Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92.

He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set.

Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977).

Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92. He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set. Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977). Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Snoops, you don't have a way with children. You must gain their confidence and make them like you.
- Madame Medusa
Yeah? Well how do you do that?
- Snoops
You force them to like you! Idiot!
- Madame Medusa
Bring her right on in boys. Come on.
- Snoops
So you tried to run away, but it didn't work did it?
- Snoops
Alright you little brat, now you're going to go down in that hole. And you are going to dig until you find me the diamond. You understand me? And no sassing me.
- Snoops
The water is coming in. Please pull me up.
- Penny
Not untill you get the diamond.
- Madame Medusa
You get down there and find the big diamond, or you'll never see the teddy again.
- Madame Medusa

Trivia

Disney recalled 3.4 million copies of the home video release after discovering two photographs of a nude women among the film's more than 110,000 frames. A Disney spokeswoman said that the pictures had been laid over the original cels of the film when it was produced in the mid-70's.

Evinrude the Dragonfly, who pushes a small boat in the film, is named after a manufacturer of outboard boat motors.

Early in development the character of Cruella Devil was to be the films villain not Medusa. There are similarities between the two characters.

The film was one of the last Disney classics to be animated by members of Walt Disney's "nine old men".

Bernard (Bob Newhart) complains several times that he hates flying. One of Newhart's comedy routines was called, "The Mrs. Grace L. Ferguson Airline (And Storm Door Company)", wherein he explains why he hates to fly.

Snoops is a caricature of film historian John Culhane, who made regular visits to the Disney studio during production and was nicknamed "Mr. Snoops" by the animators.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video September 18, 1992

Released in United States Summer June 1977

Re-released in United States 1983

Re-released in United States March 17, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video January 1999

Re-released in Amsterdam April 13, 1990.

Re-released in London April 6, 1990.

Re-released in Rome April 1990.

Re-released in Sydney December 13, 1990.

Re-released in United States 1983

Re-released in United States on Video January 1999

Re-released in United States March 17, 1989

Released in United States Summer June 1977

Released in United States on Video September 18, 1992