Appointment with Death


1h 48m 1988

Brief Synopsis

Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot finds his vacation trip to the Holy Land (Palestine circa 1937) interrupted when one of the members of his tour group is murdered at an archaeological dig, and Poirot must solve the crime before continuing with his holiday.

Film Details

Also Known As
Döden till mötes
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing
Location
Italy; Jerusalem, Israel; Acre, Israel; Qumran, Israel; England, United Kingdom; Jaffa, Israel

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot finds his vacation trip to the Holy Land (Palestine circa 1937) interrupted when one of the members of his tour group is murdered at an archaeological dig, and Poirot must solve the crime before continuing with his holiday.

Crew

Asher Asherov

Props

David Auld

Sound

Anat Avivi

Props

Avi Avivi

Art Director

Frank Barber

Music Arranger

Frank Barber

Music

Anna Bargiel

Wardrobe Assistant

Stephen Barker

Post-Production Supervisor

Chris Barnes

Executive Editor

Muki Ben-hamo

Transportation Captain

Danny Ben-menahem

Location Coordinator

Judith Ben-yod

Wardrobe Assistant

Miki Benjamini

Other

Charles Biderman

Makeup Assistant

John Blezard

Production Designer

John Bloomfield

Costume Designer

Esty Braminsky

Hair Assistant

Clifton Brandon

Production Manager

Peter Buckman

Screenplay

Chris Carreras

Assistant Director

Alan Cassie

Set Decorator

Razi Chan

Location Manager

Ayelet Chen

Wardrobe Assistant

Agatha Christie

Source Material (From Novel)

Yvonne Coppard

Makeup

Gadi Danzig

Steadicam Operator

Laura Dinolesko

Wardrobe Assistant

Pino Donaggio

Music

Rona Doron

Wardrobe

Giancarlo Ferrando

Dp/Cinematographer

Giancarlo Ferrando

Director Of Photography

Dana Fogach

Makeup Assistant

John Fraser

Assistant

Asher Gat

Production Manager

Marcia Gay

Assistant Director

Alfred Gershoni

Construction Manager

Paula Gillespie

Hair

Yoram Globus

Executive Producer

Menahem Golan

Executive Producer

Shaul Gorodetzki

Assistant Director

David Gurfinkel

Dp/Cinematographer

David Gurfinkel

Director Of Photography

Mati Halachmi

Makeup Assistant

Yoni Hamenachem

Photography

Richard Hammatt

Technical Advisor

Hanan Haogen

Animal Trainer

Graeme Harrington

Assistant

Pat Hay

Makeup

Nick Johns

Other

Rafi Kadishson

Music

Jakob Kalusky

Choreographer

Boaz Katzenelson

Props

Stephanie Kaye

Hair

Debi Klider

Makeup Assistant

Itzik Kol

Production Supervisor

Naomi Kol

Production Accountant

Rafi Laadan

Production Assistant

Avraham Leibman

Gaffer

Cheryl Leigh

Continuity

Tony Lenny

Sound Editor

Tami Levi

Hair

Brian Lintern

Music Editor

Dyson Lovell

Casting Director

Daniel Magen

Props

Natale Massara

Music Conductor

Miguel Merkin

Set Decorator

Blondine Mille

Wardrobe Assistant

Talia Natanzon

Wardrobe Assistant

Mati Raz

Associate Producer

Mary Richarson

Other

Edna Rosen

Production Coordinator

Peter Russell

Other

Vered Sapir

Other

Geoffrey Sebag-montefiore

Assistant

Miri Sformes

Assistant Director

Simon Shabach

Key Grip

Anthony Shaffer

Screenplay

Danny Shneor

Director Of Photography

Danny Shneor

Dp/Cinematographer

Shuli Silberberg

Wardrobe

Rami Siman-tov

Other

Uri Steinmatz

Other

Ora Strikovski

Assistant

Bill Surridge

Construction Manager

Yehuda Tatarko

Location Manager

Maya Tavi

Casting Director

Shlomo Tzafrir

Set Decorator

David Varod

Construction Coordinator

Arie Vies

Props

Issahar Vishnia

Props

Arthur Wicks

Property Master

Michael Winner

Producer

Michael Winner

Editor

Michael Winner

Screenplay

David Wynn-jones

Dp/Cinematographer

David Wynn-jones

Director Of Photography

Eli Yarkoni

Sound

Yosi Yarkoni

Boom Operator

Udi Yerushalmi

Other

Rafi Zabar

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Döden till mötes
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing
Location
Italy; Jerusalem, Israel; Acre, Israel; Qumran, Israel; England, United Kingdom; Jaffa, Israel

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)


Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82.

He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut.

His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942).

He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough.

After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following.

Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960).

The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964).

He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986).

Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency.

Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82. He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut. His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942). He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough. After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following. Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960). The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964). He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986). Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency. Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 8, 1988

Began shooting May 24, 1987.

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 8, 1988