For Your Eyes Only


2h 7m 1981
For Your Eyes Only

Brief Synopsis

After a ship is sunk off the coast of Albania, the world's superpowers begin a feverish search for its valuable lost cargo: the powerful ATAC system, which will give the bearer unlimited control over Polaris nuclear submarines. As James Bond (Agent 007) joins the search, he suspects the suave Kristatos of seizing the device. The competition between nations grows more deadly by the moment, but Bond finds an ally in the beautiful Melina Havelock, who blames Kristatos for the death of her parents. Agent 007 navigates his way through passionate encounters and risky confrontations which draw him into a world of arduous challenge, including, automobile chases, underwater battles, a tour over razor-sharp coral reefs, and an assault on an imposing mountaintop fortress.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Ur dödlig synvinkel, Rien que pour vos yeux
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Mystery
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
1981
Location
Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m

Synopsis

After a ship is sunk off the coast of Albania, the world's superpowers begin a feverish search for its valuable lost cargo: the powerful ATAC system, which will give the bearer unlimited control over Polaris nuclear submarines. As James Bond (Agent 007) joins the search, he suspects the suave Kristatos of seizing the device. The competition between nations grows more deadly by the moment, but Bond finds an ally in the beautiful Melina Havelock, who blames Kristatos for the death of her parents. Agent 007 navigates his way through passionate encounters and risky confrontations which draw him into a world of arduous challenge, including, automobile chases, underwater battles, a tour over razor-sharp coral reefs, and an assault on an imposing mountaintop fortress.

Crew

Eric Allwright

Makeup

Verena Baldeo

Other

Derek Ball

Sound

Sally Ball

Production Assistant

Pat Banta

Stunts

Ken Barker

Sound

Reginald A Barkshire

Production Associate

Peter Bennet

Unit Location Manager

Maurice Binder

Main Title Design

Mara Blasetti

Production Manager

Willy Bogner

Photography

Sabine Boueke

Other

Steve Bowerman

Other

Eric Boyd-perkins

Editing

Eric Boyd-perkins

Assistant

Nigel Brendish

Other

Albert R. Broccoli

Producer

Tony Broccoli

Assistant Director

Robin Browne

Other

Cyd Child

Stunts

Walter Clayton

Other

Bill Conti

Music

Bill Conti

Song

Jo Cote

Stunts

Ken Court

Other

John Crewdson

Other

Peter Davies

Editor

James Devis

Photography

Giovanni Dibona

Other

Vernon Dixon

Set Decorator

Czeslav Dyzma

Other

Sheena Easton

Song Performer

John Eaves

Stunts

John Evans

Special Effects

John Fenner

Art Director

Ian Fleming

Story By

Ian Fleming

Other

Ian Fleming

From Story

Brian Foley

Choreographer

Gerhard Fromm

Other

George Frost

Makeup

Franco Fumagalli

Art Director

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant Director

Al Giddings

Photography

Barry Goldsmith

Technical Advisor

Martin Grace

Stunts

Arlette Greenfield

Other

John Grover

Editor

David Halsey

Technical Advisor

Keith Hamshere

Photography

Hans Hechenbichler

Stunts

Gerhard Huber

Other

Alan Hume

Dp/Cinematographer

Alan Hume

Director Of Photography

Brian Humphrey

Props

Dewi Humphreys

Camera Operator

Walter Huse

Key Grip

Randolph Johnson

Other

Van Jones

Liaison

Michel Julienne

Stunts

Remy Julienne

Stunt Coordinator

Wolfgang Junginger

Stunts

Mikes Karapiperis

Art Director

Stephanie Kaye

Hair

Terry Kerby

Other

Robert Kindred

Camera Operator

Wolfgang Kleinwaechter

Other

Philip Kohler

Production Manager

Michaelis Lambrinos

Unit Location Manager

Aspa Lambrou

Production Manager

Michael Lamont

Art Director

Peter Lamont

Production Designer

Doug Laughlin

Other

George Leech

Stunts

Wendy Leech

Stunts

Michael J Leeson

Song

Jean-pierre Lelong

Sound Effects

Marsha Lewis

Hair

Jack Lowin

Camera Operator

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Richard Maibaum

Screenplay

Gordon K. Mccallum

Sound

Gavin Mckinney

Stunts

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Derek Meddings

Special Effects Supervisor

Vernon Messenger

Sound Editor

Colin Miller

Sound Editor

Alec Mills

Camera Operator

Gareth Milne

Stunts

John Morgan

Camera Operator

Redmond Morris

Unit Location Manager

Tiny Nicholls

Wardrobe

Charles Nicklin

Other

Monty Norman

Song

Georg Ostler

Other

Bernard Pascual

Stunts

Tom Pevsner

Associate Producer

Raemonde Rahvis

Wardrobe

Michael Ratajzcak

Other

Denis Rich

Production

John Richards

Sound

Peter Rohe

Other

Iris Rose

Production Assistant

Umberto Sambuco

Unit Location Manager

Elaine Schreyeck

Script Supervisor

Robert Simmonds

Production Supervisor

Robert Simmonds

Stunt Coordinator

Ernest F. Smith

Scenic Artist

Maude Spector

Casting

Gareth Tandy

Assistant Director

Victor Tourjansky

Other

Bill Trent

Sound Editor

Christian Troschke

Other

Andrew Von Preussen

Other

Elizabeth Waller

Costume Designer

Anthony Waye

Assistant Director

Albert Werry

Other

Michael G. Wilson

Executive Producer

Michael G. Wilson

Screenplay

Paul Wilson

Photography

Vincent Winter

Unit Location Manager

Marc Wolff

Other

Arthur Wooster

Dp/Cinematographer

Arthur Wooster

Director Of Photography

Frances Young

Stunts

Michael Zimbrich

Assistant Director

Videos

Movie Clip

For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- Open, Some Sort Of Emergency At a Buckinghamshire parish cemetery, west of London, James Bond (Roger Moore, in his fifth appearance, in the 12th United Artists 007 feature) encounters a vicar (Fred Bryant), a pilot (George Sweeney) then a cat who must be Ernst Stavro Blofeld (voice by Robert Rietty), opening For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- Title Song, Credits With Bond (Roger Moore) having apparently finally offed Blofeld in the opening, then (unusually) appearing himself in the credit and title song sequence, giving way to then pop-sensation Sheena Easton, becoming (still!) the only Bond theme vocalist ever to appear on camera, with the Academy Award-nominated song by Bill Conti and Michael J. Leeson, which reached #4 on the U.S. Billboard chart, from For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- I Hope You Have A Car Having parked his Lotus, casing “a villa near Madrid,” where Cuban assassin Gonzales (Stefan Kalipha), who killed an MI6-asset couple, is being paid off by an unidentified spook (Michael Gothard), Bond (Roger Moore) is captured, until the victims’ daughter (Carole Bouquet) steps in with a crossbow, in For Your Eyes Only, 1981.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) - -- By Strangling His Psychiatrist Back in London, Bond (Roger Moore) visits Q (Desmond Llewelyn) for the requisite gadget-gag sequence, then uses the “Identigraph” to pick out Locque (Michael Gothard), finishing with a mild admonition by Tanner (James Villiers), standing in for “on-leave” M (actually the late Bernard Lee, who died during preparation for the film), in For Your Eyes Only, 1981.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Ur dödlig synvinkel, Rien que pour vos yeux
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Mystery
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
1981
Location
Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m

Award Nominations

Best Song

1981

Articles

For Your Eyes Only


For Your Eyes Only

James Bond didn't just save the free world in this 1981 film. He also saved United Artists, a studio teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. This was the 12th official Bond film and the fifth starring Roger Moore. It was also the last Bond film released solely by United Artists, which merged with MGM after its release. The film's success helped make the company's acquisition more attractive. John Glen, who had previously worked as editor and second unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979), made his directing debut with this film. He would go on to direct the next four films in the series.

This was the first Bond film to be based on Ian Fleming's short stories rather than one of his novels. Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson took their plot from two stories in For Your Eyes Only, the title story and "Risico." They also borrowed plot elements from the novels Live and Let Die, Goldfinger and On Her Majesty's Secret Service. After the sci-fi antics of Moonraker, Glen urged the producers to return to the earlier films' more earthbound plots. As a result, the writers sent Bond on a mission to recapture a set of nuclear codes lost when a British ship sank in the Mediterranean. When the husband-and-wife archaeologists who've tracked down the wreck are murdered, Bond teams up with their vengeful daughter, Melina Havelock (Carole Bouquet), in order to beat the Soviets to the code. Because of international interest in the Lake Placid Winter Olympics of 1980, the screenwriters featured a variety of winter sports, including ice-skating, downhill and cross-country skiing and tobogganing.

The pre-credits sequence features an unnamed character with all the attributes of the classic Bond villain Blofeld, including his usual Nehru jacket and white cat. Producer Albert Broccoli was in a rights dispute with filmmaker Kevin McClory, who owned the rights to the novel Thunderball and claimed exclusive rights to the Blofeld character. Killing off the Blofeld-like character before the credits rolled, was Broccoli's way of showing McClory he didn't need him. Although McClory would use Blofeld in his unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again (1983), the character would not return to the official series until Spectre (2015), by which point the rights dispute had been settled.

This is the only Bond movie without M. Bernard Lee, who had played the role since Dr. No (1962), passed away during pre-production. Rather than re-cast, the producer's had Desmond Llewelyn's role as Q expanded, and lines were added to say that M was on leave. Robert Brown would take over as M in the next film, Octopussy (1983).

Moore had expressed his desire to leave the series, so the film was written to open with Bond visiting his wife's grave as a way of giving the new Bond a link to the rest of the series. Broccoli scouted actor Timothy Dalton for the role by watching the film Flash Gordon (1980), which also included Topol. When Moore decided to make For Your Eyes Only after all, Broccoli cast Topol (whom his wife had met at a charity function) as the Greek smuggler, Milos. Sylvia Kristel was originally cast as Melina, but production on Lady Chatterley's Lover (1981) ran over schedule. A United Artists publicist suggested Broccoli look at Carole Bouquet, who had previously auditioned for the female lead in Moonraker. After seeing her in That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), they cast her. Because of her French accent, the role was dubbed by another actress, though Bouquet recorded her lines for the French-language release.

Because Bouquet had a sinus condition, she couldn't film underwater, so stunt doubles were used for the diving scenes. For close-ups during the scene in which she and Moore are keelhauled, the actors were shot on a dry sound stage with a wind machine making their hair and faces move as though they were being dragged underwater. The shots were done in slow motion and sped up in the final print, with water and Alka Seltzer bubbles super-imposed over the image to complete the illusion.

The rock climbing sequences posed special problems for Moore, who suffered from vertigo. Although a stuntman did the most dangerous portions of the scene, Moore still had to shoot close-ups on the cliff face, which he did fortified by Valium and a glass of beer. An even bigger problem arose on that location when the monks at the mountaintop monastery took offense at the series' violence and put plastic over the building's roofs and hung sheets and other laundry from their windows in an attempt to prevent filming. Even a personal appeal from Moore didn't help. The case wound up in the Greek Supreme Court, where the judges determined the monks only controlled the monastery's interior. The exterior belonged to the people. With continued resistance, however, the production team built a fake monastery on a nearby peak. Interior monastery scenes were filmed back at Pinewood Studios.

For Your Eyes Only opened to mixed reviews. The most positive critics focused on the action scenes like Time magazine's Richard Corliss, who thought it was terrific entertainment. Others, however, carped that the scenes between the stunts were "too long...and pretty boring" (Derek Malcolm in The Guardian). Critics were also beginning to complain about Moore's advancing age, with Time Out saying "Moore really is old enough to be the uncle of those girls." Despite those complaints, the film was another huge hit. It's $195 million international gross saved United Artists from bankruptcy after the box-office failure of Heaven's Gate (1980). The contrast between the two films turned UA away from personal projects and switched its focus to blockbusters for years to come.

Bill Conti and Michael Leeson's title song, performed by Sheena Easton, was the first Bond theme for which a music video was created. Easton was also the first title singer to be included in the film, mainly because art director Maurice Binder thought she was too striking not to be shown on screen. When the song was nominated for the Oscar for Best Song, Easton sang it at the ceremonies in an elaborate musical number featuring Harold Sakata as Oddjob from Goldfinger (1964) and Richard Kiel as Jaws from The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. After the performance, Moore came on stage to present the Irving Thalberg Memorial Award to Broccoli.

Director: John Glen
Producer: Albert R. Broccoli
Screenplay: Richard Maibaum & Michael G. Wilson
Cinematography: Alan Hume
Score: Bill Conti
Cast: Roger Moore (Ian Fleming's James Bond 007), Carole Bouquet (Melina Havelock), Topol (Milos Columbo), Lynn-Holly Johnson (Bibi Dahl), Julian Glover (Kristatos), Cassandra Harris (Lisl), Jill Bennett (Jacoba Brink), Michael Gothard (Locque), Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny), Desmond Llewelyn (Q), Geoffrey Keen (Minister of Defense), James Villiers (Tanner), Charles Dance (Claus), Sheena Easton (Herself), Michael G. Wilson (Greek Priest at Wedding)

By Frank Miller
For Your Eyes Only

For Your Eyes Only

For Your Eyes Only James Bond didn't just save the free world in this 1981 film. He also saved United Artists, a studio teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. This was the 12th official Bond film and the fifth starring Roger Moore. It was also the last Bond film released solely by United Artists, which merged with MGM after its release. The film's success helped make the company's acquisition more attractive. John Glen, who had previously worked as editor and second unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979), made his directing debut with this film. He would go on to direct the next four films in the series. This was the first Bond film to be based on Ian Fleming's short stories rather than one of his novels. Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson took their plot from two stories in For Your Eyes Only, the title story and "Risico." They also borrowed plot elements from the novels Live and Let Die, Goldfinger and On Her Majesty's Secret Service. After the sci-fi antics of Moonraker, Glen urged the producers to return to the earlier films' more earthbound plots. As a result, the writers sent Bond on a mission to recapture a set of nuclear codes lost when a British ship sank in the Mediterranean. When the husband-and-wife archaeologists who've tracked down the wreck are murdered, Bond teams up with their vengeful daughter, Melina Havelock (Carole Bouquet), in order to beat the Soviets to the code. Because of international interest in the Lake Placid Winter Olympics of 1980, the screenwriters featured a variety of winter sports, including ice-skating, downhill and cross-country skiing and tobogganing. The pre-credits sequence features an unnamed character with all the attributes of the classic Bond villain Blofeld, including his usual Nehru jacket and white cat. Producer Albert Broccoli was in a rights dispute with filmmaker Kevin McClory, who owned the rights to the novel Thunderball and claimed exclusive rights to the Blofeld character. Killing off the Blofeld-like character before the credits rolled, was Broccoli's way of showing McClory he didn't need him. Although McClory would use Blofeld in his unofficial Bond film Never Say Never Again (1983), the character would not return to the official series until Spectre (2015), by which point the rights dispute had been settled. This is the only Bond movie without M. Bernard Lee, who had played the role since Dr. No (1962), passed away during pre-production. Rather than re-cast, the producer's had Desmond Llewelyn's role as Q expanded, and lines were added to say that M was on leave. Robert Brown would take over as M in the next film, Octopussy (1983). Moore had expressed his desire to leave the series, so the film was written to open with Bond visiting his wife's grave as a way of giving the new Bond a link to the rest of the series. Broccoli scouted actor Timothy Dalton for the role by watching the film Flash Gordon (1980), which also included Topol. When Moore decided to make For Your Eyes Only after all, Broccoli cast Topol (whom his wife had met at a charity function) as the Greek smuggler, Milos. Sylvia Kristel was originally cast as Melina, but production on Lady Chatterley's Lover (1981) ran over schedule. A United Artists publicist suggested Broccoli look at Carole Bouquet, who had previously auditioned for the female lead in Moonraker. After seeing her in That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), they cast her. Because of her French accent, the role was dubbed by another actress, though Bouquet recorded her lines for the French-language release. Because Bouquet had a sinus condition, she couldn't film underwater, so stunt doubles were used for the diving scenes. For close-ups during the scene in which she and Moore are keelhauled, the actors were shot on a dry sound stage with a wind machine making their hair and faces move as though they were being dragged underwater. The shots were done in slow motion and sped up in the final print, with water and Alka Seltzer bubbles super-imposed over the image to complete the illusion. The rock climbing sequences posed special problems for Moore, who suffered from vertigo. Although a stuntman did the most dangerous portions of the scene, Moore still had to shoot close-ups on the cliff face, which he did fortified by Valium and a glass of beer. An even bigger problem arose on that location when the monks at the mountaintop monastery took offense at the series' violence and put plastic over the building's roofs and hung sheets and other laundry from their windows in an attempt to prevent filming. Even a personal appeal from Moore didn't help. The case wound up in the Greek Supreme Court, where the judges determined the monks only controlled the monastery's interior. The exterior belonged to the people. With continued resistance, however, the production team built a fake monastery on a nearby peak. Interior monastery scenes were filmed back at Pinewood Studios. For Your Eyes Only opened to mixed reviews. The most positive critics focused on the action scenes like Time magazine's Richard Corliss, who thought it was terrific entertainment. Others, however, carped that the scenes between the stunts were "too long...and pretty boring" (Derek Malcolm in The Guardian). Critics were also beginning to complain about Moore's advancing age, with Time Out saying "Moore really is old enough to be the uncle of those girls." Despite those complaints, the film was another huge hit. It's $195 million international gross saved United Artists from bankruptcy after the box-office failure of Heaven's Gate (1980). The contrast between the two films turned UA away from personal projects and switched its focus to blockbusters for years to come. Bill Conti and Michael Leeson's title song, performed by Sheena Easton, was the first Bond theme for which a music video was created. Easton was also the first title singer to be included in the film, mainly because art director Maurice Binder thought she was too striking not to be shown on screen. When the song was nominated for the Oscar for Best Song, Easton sang it at the ceremonies in an elaborate musical number featuring Harold Sakata as Oddjob from Goldfinger (1964) and Richard Kiel as Jaws from The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. After the performance, Moore came on stage to present the Irving Thalberg Memorial Award to Broccoli. Director: John Glen Producer: Albert R. Broccoli Screenplay: Richard Maibaum & Michael G. Wilson Cinematography: Alan Hume Score: Bill Conti Cast: Roger Moore (Ian Fleming's James Bond 007), Carole Bouquet (Melina Havelock), Topol (Milos Columbo), Lynn-Holly Johnson (Bibi Dahl), Julian Glover (Kristatos), Cassandra Harris (Lisl), Jill Bennett (Jacoba Brink), Michael Gothard (Locque), Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny), Desmond Llewelyn (Q), Geoffrey Keen (Minister of Defense), James Villiers (Tanner), Charles Dance (Claus), Sheena Easton (Herself), Michael G. Wilson (Greek Priest at Wedding) By Frank Miller

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 26, 1981

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Summer June 26, 1981