Live and Let Die


2h 11m 1973
Live and Let Die

Brief Synopsis

When James Bond (Agent 007) investigates the murders of three fellow agents, he soon finds himself a target, evading vicious assassins as he closes in on the powerful Kananga. Known on the streets as "Mr. Big," Kananga is coordinating a globally threatening scheme using tons of self-produced heroin. As Bond tries to unravel the mastermind's plan, he meets Solitaire, the beautiful Tarot card reader whose magical gifts are crucial to the crime lord. Bond works his own magic on her, and embarks on a series of adventures, involving voodoo, hungry crocodiles and turbo-charged speedboats.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Leva och låta dö, Ian Fleming's Live and Let Die, Vivre et laisser mourir
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
1973
Location
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Jamaica; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Rankcolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.66 : 1, 1.85 : 1

Synopsis

When James Bond (Agent 007) investigates the murders of three fellow agents, he soon finds himself a target, evading vicious assassins as he closes in on the powerful Kananga. Known on the streets as "Mr. Big," Kananga is coordinating a globally threatening scheme using tons of self-produced heroin. As Bond tries to unravel the mastermind's plan, he meets Solitaire, the beautiful Tarot card reader whose magical gifts are crucial to the crime lord. Bond works his own magic on her, and embarks on a series of adventures, involving voodoo, hungry crocodiles and turbo-charged speedboats.

Crew

Ken Barker

Sound Recordist

Bert Bates

Editor

Bill Bennet

Stunt Coordinator

Maurice Binder

Titles

George Bouillet

Camera Operator

Albert R. Broccoli

Producer

Syd Cain

Art Director

Joie Chitwood

Stunt Coordinator

Jerry Comeaux

Stunt Coordinator

Derek Cracknell

Assistant Director

Leon Davis

Construction Manager

Weston Drury Jr.

Casting Director

Ian Fleming

Source Material (From Novel)

William Grefe

Assistant Director

Bernard Hanson

Location Manager

John Harris

Camera

Julie Harris

Costume Designer

Stephen Hendrickson

Art Director

Geoffrey Holder

Choreographer

Alan Hopkins

Assistant Director

Claude Hudson

Production Supervisor

Colin Jamison

Hairdresser

Ross Kananga

Stunt Coordinator

Stephen F. Kesten

Production Manager

Robert Kindred

Camera Operator

Robert Laing

Art Director

Peter Lamont

Art Director

Chris Lancaster

Sound Editor

Tom Mankiewicz

Screenplay

George Martin

Original Score

Teddy Mason

Sound Editor

Linda Mccartney

Song

Paul Mccartney

Song

Derek Meddings

Special Effects

John W. Mitchell

Sound Recordist

Ted Moore

Director Of Photography

Ted Moore

Dp/Cinematographer

Monty Norman

Theme Music

Raymond Poulton

Editor

Paul Rabiger

Makeup

Michael Rauch

Unit Manager

Warren Rothenberger

Camera Operator

Harry Saltzman

Producer

Elaine Schreyeck

Continuity

Jimmy Shields

Sound Editor

John Shirley

Editor

Bobby Simmons

Stunt Coordinator

Steven Skloot

Project Manager

Eddie Bo Smith

Stunt Coordinator

Charles Staffell

Visual Effects

Laurel Staffell

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jack Weis

Location Coordinator

Patrick Weymouth

Props

Videos

Movie Clip

Live And Let Die (1973) - Nothing About My Future? Entering a Harlem restaurant (called “Fillet Of Soul”) gently pursuing possible cohorts of a suspicious Caribbean dictator, James Bond (Roger Moore) is snatched, meeting soothsayer Solitare (Jane Seymour), goon Tee Hee (Julius Harris), and the gangster “Mr. Big,” early in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Did You Mess With That? SPOILER here in Yaphet Kotto’s Bond-villain performance, captured Bond (Roger Moore) is interrogated by Mr. Big, who wants to know whether he’s despoiled Solitare (Jane Seymour) and thereby destroyed her psychic powers, meanwhile discussing his own links to the mysterious dictator Kananga, in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - She Had The Power And Lost It Yaphet Kotto as still largely mysterious Caribbean dictator Dr. Kananga is pressing his resplendent tarot card reader Solitare (Jane Seymour) about recent failures in her prognostications about Bond (Roger Moore, in his first performance, in the 8th 007 feature), who is on an aerial stake-out with colleague Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - The Man Who Shares My Hairbrush In fictional San Monique, bumbling but decorative novice CIA operative Rosie (ex-model and Playboy “bunny” Gloria Hendry) joins Bond (Roger Moore, in his first portrayal of 007) hiring a boat to visit the dictator’s private island, captained by Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Title Song, Insomnia, Sir? After three murders (of not-too-dashing likely-English guys) in the prologue, the title song by Paul & Linda McCartney, produced by George Martin, (which went to #2 on the Billboard U.S. chart, becoming by-far the most successful Bond theme ever) followed by M (Bernard Lee) intruding on 007 (Roger Moore, in his first appearance in the role) and a paramour (Madeline Smith), in Live And Let Die, 1973.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Leva och låta dö, Ian Fleming's Live and Let Die, Vivre et laisser mourir
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
1973
Location
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Jamaica; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Rankcolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.66 : 1, 1.85 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1973

Articles

Live and Let Die


When Sean Connery finally quit the James Bond series, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli didn't want to repeat their difficult experience with George Lazenby, the one-shot 007 of On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969). Instead of another unknown, they tapped the dependable veteran Roger Moore, a consummate professional who had been considered for the role twice before and had just spent seven years playing a somewhat 007-like character on TV's The Saint. Writer Tom Mankiewicz would need to re-invent Bond to fit Moore's lighter, more genteel personality.

Mankiewicz had already updated Diamonds are Forever (1971) by adding gay and lesbian assassins, upping the comedy quotient and adding more action set-pieces. He lobbied for Ian Fleming's second 007 book, Live and Let Die, next because he liked the idea of dropping Moore's polite interpretation of Bond into a trendy Blaxploitation context. When Moore tries to introduce himself, as had Sean Connery, Yaphet Kotto's main villain Mr. Big shuts him down cold: "Names are for tombstones, baby! Take this honkey out and waste him!" Roger Moore's Bond differs from Connery in that he's less of a brutal thug and more of a gentleman. He plays 007 almost as a comic character, often responding to challenges with smart repartee instead of violence.

Mankiewicz populates the story with characters worthy of a comic strip. Common heroin dealer Mr. Big wears a rubber mask to carry off his disguise as Dr. Kananga, the corrupt leader of a Caribbean island. His main bodyguard Tee Hee (Julius Harris) has a deadly metal claw in place of a hand. Dancer-choreographer Geoffrey Holder is the Voodoo figure Baron Samedi, who presides over murder rituals by poisonous snake. Samedi's ability to return from the dead seems at first to be clever stage magic, but by the finale he's established as immortal.

Also given a supernatural twist is Solitaire, Mr. Big's Tarot-reading spiritualist advisor. Her power to divine the future will last only as long as she is a virgin, which gives Bond's seduction a secondary purpose. Mankiewicz wanted Diana Ross to play Solitaire but the producers insisted on a white heroine as in the book and hired actress Jane Seymour. As per formula, the show features two more 'Bond girls.' Actress Madeline Smith is a cute but disposable bedmate for the opening scene. Actress Gloria Hendry is the 'bad' Bond girl for this outing, a double agent who leads 007 into a trap. She holds the dubious distinction as James Bond's first black bed partner.

The producers filmed in Harlem, New Orleans and Jamaica, following the old Hitchcock rule to allow locations to suggest action set-pieces. New Orleans is exploited for a jazz funeral and an alligator farm. In an elaborate, hair-raising scene, 007 escapes from certain death by using a row of crocodiles as stepping stones to safety.

Most of Live and Let Die's (1973) action returns to the format of a Republic serial. Chase scenes employ ordinary cars in Manhattan, a double-decker bus on San Monique, a Piper Cub airplane in New Orleans and finally a score of high-powered speedboats on a Louisiana Bayou. Making the boats vault high in the air over roadways resulted in numerous crashes and minor injuries. A gag in which the boats zip across a bayou lawn laid out for a wedding is worthy of a Buster Keaton film.

Mankiewicz uses humor to defuse what might be taken as racist stereotyping. Storefronts in Harlem are named 'Fillet of Soul' and 'Oh Cult Voodoo Shop'. In any serious context, the finale would be offensive: a grinning witch doctor prepares the white heroine Solitaire for human sacrifice during a 'savage' Voodoo dance. Helping to rebalance the white hero/black villain equation on the bayou is Sheriff Pepper, played as a redneck clown by New York actor Clifton James. The wildly exaggerated Pepper gives audiences a white fool to laugh at, cleverly converting race insensitivity into more broad comedy.

In keeping with the effort to make a fresh start, Live and Let Die breaks with the music formula previously set by composer John Barry. Paul McCartney's excellent title theme became the most popular Bond tune ever. It fronts a dynamic, different soundtrack by the Beatles' producer-composer George Martin. The result gives Roger Moore's 007 debut its own identity.

Despite the producers' worries about resentful Sean Connery fans, the 007 franchise reboot was well received. The New York Times recognized it as well-made matinee thriller fun, "a superb collection of grotesque ways of killing." Roger Ebert found it lacking in style and wit but acknowledged that the Bond formula indeed appeared to be indestructible. Live and Let Die would be the first of seven Bonds for Roger Moore. When he finished his final outing, A View to a Kill (1985), he had just celebrated his 57th birthday.

By Glenn Erickson
Live And Let Die

Live and Let Die

When Sean Connery finally quit the James Bond series, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli didn't want to repeat their difficult experience with George Lazenby, the one-shot 007 of On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969). Instead of another unknown, they tapped the dependable veteran Roger Moore, a consummate professional who had been considered for the role twice before and had just spent seven years playing a somewhat 007-like character on TV's The Saint. Writer Tom Mankiewicz would need to re-invent Bond to fit Moore's lighter, more genteel personality. Mankiewicz had already updated Diamonds are Forever (1971) by adding gay and lesbian assassins, upping the comedy quotient and adding more action set-pieces. He lobbied for Ian Fleming's second 007 book, Live and Let Die, next because he liked the idea of dropping Moore's polite interpretation of Bond into a trendy Blaxploitation context. When Moore tries to introduce himself, as had Sean Connery, Yaphet Kotto's main villain Mr. Big shuts him down cold: "Names are for tombstones, baby! Take this honkey out and waste him!" Roger Moore's Bond differs from Connery in that he's less of a brutal thug and more of a gentleman. He plays 007 almost as a comic character, often responding to challenges with smart repartee instead of violence. Mankiewicz populates the story with characters worthy of a comic strip. Common heroin dealer Mr. Big wears a rubber mask to carry off his disguise as Dr. Kananga, the corrupt leader of a Caribbean island. His main bodyguard Tee Hee (Julius Harris) has a deadly metal claw in place of a hand. Dancer-choreographer Geoffrey Holder is the Voodoo figure Baron Samedi, who presides over murder rituals by poisonous snake. Samedi's ability to return from the dead seems at first to be clever stage magic, but by the finale he's established as immortal. Also given a supernatural twist is Solitaire, Mr. Big's Tarot-reading spiritualist advisor. Her power to divine the future will last only as long as she is a virgin, which gives Bond's seduction a secondary purpose. Mankiewicz wanted Diana Ross to play Solitaire but the producers insisted on a white heroine as in the book and hired actress Jane Seymour. As per formula, the show features two more 'Bond girls.' Actress Madeline Smith is a cute but disposable bedmate for the opening scene. Actress Gloria Hendry is the 'bad' Bond girl for this outing, a double agent who leads 007 into a trap. She holds the dubious distinction as James Bond's first black bed partner. The producers filmed in Harlem, New Orleans and Jamaica, following the old Hitchcock rule to allow locations to suggest action set-pieces. New Orleans is exploited for a jazz funeral and an alligator farm. In an elaborate, hair-raising scene, 007 escapes from certain death by using a row of crocodiles as stepping stones to safety. Most of Live and Let Die's (1973) action returns to the format of a Republic serial. Chase scenes employ ordinary cars in Manhattan, a double-decker bus on San Monique, a Piper Cub airplane in New Orleans and finally a score of high-powered speedboats on a Louisiana Bayou. Making the boats vault high in the air over roadways resulted in numerous crashes and minor injuries. A gag in which the boats zip across a bayou lawn laid out for a wedding is worthy of a Buster Keaton film. Mankiewicz uses humor to defuse what might be taken as racist stereotyping. Storefronts in Harlem are named 'Fillet of Soul' and 'Oh Cult Voodoo Shop'. In any serious context, the finale would be offensive: a grinning witch doctor prepares the white heroine Solitaire for human sacrifice during a 'savage' Voodoo dance. Helping to rebalance the white hero/black villain equation on the bayou is Sheriff Pepper, played as a redneck clown by New York actor Clifton James. The wildly exaggerated Pepper gives audiences a white fool to laugh at, cleverly converting race insensitivity into more broad comedy. In keeping with the effort to make a fresh start, Live and Let Die breaks with the music formula previously set by composer John Barry. Paul McCartney's excellent title theme became the most popular Bond tune ever. It fronts a dynamic, different soundtrack by the Beatles' producer-composer George Martin. The result gives Roger Moore's 007 debut its own identity. Despite the producers' worries about resentful Sean Connery fans, the 007 franchise reboot was well received. The New York Times recognized it as well-made matinee thriller fun, "a superb collection of grotesque ways of killing." Roger Ebert found it lacking in style and wit but acknowledged that the Bond formula indeed appeared to be indestructible. Live and Let Die would be the first of seven Bonds for Roger Moore. When he finished his final outing, A View to a Kill (1985), he had just celebrated his 57th birthday. By Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Did you mess with that?
- Mr. Big
J.W., this fellow's from England, see, and he's over here workin' with our government, sort of a... secret agent.
- Deputy
*Secret Agent*? On whose side?
- Sheriff J.W. Pepper
You know where you're going?
- Cab driver
Uptown, I believe?
- James Bond
Uptown? You headed into Harlem!
- Cab driver
Well you just stay on the tail of that jukebox and there's an extra twenty dollars in it for you.
- James Bond
Hey man, for twenty bucks I'd take you to a Ku Klux Klan cookout!
- Cab driver
Give my regards to Baron Samedi, right between the eyes.
- Quarrel
There are two ways to disable an alligator, Mr. Bond.
- Tee-Hee
I don't suppose you'd tell me what they are.
- James Bond
One way is to jab a pen right above it's eye.
- Tee-Hee
And the other way?
- James Bond
Oh, the other way is twice as simple. Just stick your hand in it's mouth and pull out all it's teeth. Heh, heh.
- Tee-Hee

Trivia

Sean Connery turned down the then astronomical sum of $5.5 million to play James Bond.

Roger Moore's first appearance as James Bond.

The character of Quarrel, Jr. is a direct reference to the first Bond film, Dr. No (1962) which also featured a character named Quarrel. The original novel takes place before Dr. No (in which, as in the movie version, Quarrel is killed) and features the first appearance of the character.

UA wanted an American to play Bond: 'Reynolds, Burt' , 'Newman, Paul' and 'Redford, Robert' were all considered. Producer Albert R. Broccoli, however, insisted that the part should be played by a Briton and put forward Moore.

The Tarot card deck used by Solitaire features contemporary paintings by Fergus Hall, "Courtesy of the Portal Gallery Limited, London, England." A duplicate set was published by in Switzerland by Agmueller & Cie, distributed worldwide by U.S. Games Systems, Inc. New York. The cards in the film had a red, patterned background featuring the "007" emblem, but the commercial set is blue instead (same pattern).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 27, 1973

Re-released in United States on Video November 7, 1995

Based on the Ian Fleming novel "Live and Let Die" (London, 1954).

Roger Moore's first appearance as James Bond.

Released in United States Summer June 27, 1973

Re-released in United States on Video November 7, 1995