The Living Daylights


2h 10m 1987
The Living Daylights

Brief Synopsis

After James Bond (Agent 007) helps Russian officer Georgi Koskov make a daring defection to the West, the intelligence community is shocked when Koskov is abducted from his remote hiding place. Bond leaps into action, following a trail that leads to the gorgeous Kara, who plays Bond as easily as she plays her Stradivari cello. As they unravel a complex weapons scheme with global implications, they are forced into soaring chases, a dangerous jailbreak, and an epic battle in the Afghanistan desert with tanks, airplanes, and a legion of freedom fighters on horseback.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Iskallt uppdrag, Living Daylights, Tuer n'est pas jouer
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
United Artists Films
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Austria; Italy; United States; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; Gibraltar; Morocco

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Synopsis

After James Bond (Agent 007) helps Russian officer Georgi Koskov make a daring defection to the West, the intelligence community is shocked when Koskov is abducted from his remote hiding place. Bond leaps into action, following a trail that leads to the gorgeous Kara, who plays Bond as easily as she plays her Stradivari cello. As they unravel a complex weapons scheme with global implications, they are forced into soaring chases, a dangerous jailbreak, and an epic battle in the Afghanistan desert with tanks, airplanes, and a legion of freedom fighters on horseback.

Crew

Terry Ackland-snow

Art Director

Ross Adams

Assistant Sound Editor

Zakaria Alaoui

Production

Eric Allwright

Makeup

Roy Alon

Stunts

Ted Ambrose

Art Assistant

Michael Anderson

Camera Operator

Kenny Atherfold

Grip

Simon Atherton

Other

Del Baker

Stunts

Derek Ball

Sound Recordist

Tina Banta

Other

Reginald A Barkshire

Production Associate

Bill Barringer

Assistant Sound Editor

John Barry

Song

John Barry

Music

Horst Becker

Other

John Bernard

Location Manager

Sonja Beutura

Location Assistant

Maurice Binder

Main Title Design

Terry Blyther

Assistant Director

Arie Bohrer

Location Manager

Christian Bonnichon

Stunts

Dennis Bosher

Art Assistant

Jean Bourne

Continuity

Brian Bowes

Stunts

Jake Brake

Stunts

Albert R. Broccoli

Producer

Barbara Broccoli

Associate Producer

Jillie Brown

Assistant Set Decorator

Joanna Brown

Other

May Capsaskis

Production Coordinator

Garry Carter

Stunts

Jorge Casares

Stunts

Chris Corbould

Special Effects

Jo Cote

Stunts

Ken Court

Art Director

Simon Crane

Stunts

Graeme Crowther

Stunts

Nick Daubeny

Location Manager

Bert Davey

Art Director

Allan Davies

Accounting Assistant

Peter Davies

Editor

Leslie Dear

Photography

Roger Deer

Art Department

Steve Dent

Stunts

Alfred Dobsak

Construction Manager

Naomi Donne

Makeup

Dawn Eeverdia

Production Coordinator

Urs Egger

Assistant Director

Frank Elliott

Other

Edwin Erfmann

Makeup

Arno Esterez

Transportation

Fred Evans

Art Department

Michael Evans

Other

John Falkiner

Stunts

Ian Fleming

From Story

Ian Fleming

Story By

Elaine Ford

Stunts

Michael Ford

Set Decorator

Sandra Frieze

Other

Mike Frift

Camera Operator

George Frost

Makeup Supervisor

Driss Gaidi

Location Manager

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant Director

Robert Gavin

Assistant Sound Editor

Nick Gillard

Stunts

Matthew Glen

Assistant Editor

Leonhard Gmur

Production Manager

Ramon Gow

Hair

Tony Graysmark

Construction Manager

Sparky Greene

Production Manager

Andreas Grosch

Transportation

John Grover

Editor

Roby Guever

Sound Recordist

Keith Hamshere

Photography

Hind Hanif

Location Assistant

Graham V Hartstone

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Mohamed Hassini

Assistant Director

Ahmed Hatimi

Assistant Director

Richard Haw

Grip

John Hayward

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Bert Hearn

Property Master

Nick Heckstall-smith

Assistant Director

Richard Hewitt

Video

Derek Holding

Sound Editor

Fred Hole

Art Director

Jean-claude Houbart

Stunts

Ida Huber

Stunts

Walter Huse

Grip

Chrissie Hynde

Song

B D Johnson

Stunts

Dominique Julienne

Stunts

Michel Julienne

Stunts

Remy Julienne

Stunts

Jean Claude Justice

Stunts

Christoph Kanter

Assistant Set Decorator

Ihsanne Khalafaoui

Production Coordinator

Alan Killick

Music Editor

Christl Kirchner

Accountant

Sophie Koekenhoff

Location Assistant

Philip Kohler

Production Manager

Michael Lamont

Art Director

Peter Lamont

Production Designer

Jean-pierre Lelong

Sound Effects

Helen Lennox

Hairdresser

Dick Lewzey

Music

Jake Lombard

Stunts

Hamish Macinnis

Other

Malcolm Macintosh

Camera Operator

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Brigitte Magnin

Stunts

Richard Maibaum

Screenplay

Peter Manhardt

Art Director

Brian Marshall

Sound Recordist

Callum Mcdougall

Assistant Director

Dan Mckinny

Other

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting Director

Jane Meagher

Accountant

Vernon Messenger

Sound Editor

Colin Miller

Sound Editor

Alec Mills

Director Of Photography

Alec Mills

Dp/Cinematographer

Janine Modder

Production Coordinator

Roy Moores

Other

Ken Morris

Special Effects

Mark Mostyn

Assistant Sound Editor

Don Mothersill

Wardrobe

Peter Musgrave

Sound Editor

Willy Neuner

Special Effects

Tiny Nicholls

Costume Supervisor

Ken Nightingall

Boom Operator

Douglas Noakes

Production Accountant

John Nuth

Assistant Editor

Daniel T O'brien

Stunts

Denise O'dell

Production Manager

Joaquin Olias

Stunts

Arno Ortmair

Production Manager

Peter Palmer

Production

Sid Palmer

Production

Pam Parker

Production Coordinator

Phil Pastuhov

Photography

Ken Pattenden

Construction Manager

Miguel Pedregosa

Stunts

Tom Pevsner

Associate Producer

Emma Porteous

Costume Designer

Greg Powell

Other

Nic Raine

Original Music

Brenda Ramos

Production Coordinator

June Randall

Continuity

Crispin Reece

Assistant Director

Thomas Riccabona

Art Director

John Richardson

Special Effects

Doug Robinson

Stunts

Peter Rohe

Camera Operator

Iris Rose

Unit Manager

Amanda Schofield

Other

Rene Seiler

Stunts

Jose Maria Serrano

Stunts

David Shilling

Other

Wayne Smith

Assistant Editor

Brian Smithies

Special Effects

Herman Sporer

Stunts

Jacqueline Stears

Scenic Artist

Mary Stellar

Other

Daniela Stibitz

Production Coordinator

Barbara Sutton

Hairdresser

Joseph Viale

Production

Jean-jacques Villain

Stunts

Fred Waugh

Camera Operator

Anthony Waye

Production Supervisor

Paul Weston

Stunts

Jason White

Stunts

George Whitear

Photography

Nick Wilkinson

Stunts

Joss Williams

Special Effects

Michael G. Wilson

Producer

Michael G. Wilson

Screenplay

Nicholas Wilson

Other

Mark Wolff

Liaison

Arthur Wooster

Director Of Photography

Arthur Wooster

Dp/Cinematographer

Stefan Zurcher

Location Manager

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Iskallt uppdrag, Living Daylights, Tuer n'est pas jouer
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
United Artists Films
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Austria; Italy; United States; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; Gibraltar; Morocco

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Articles

The Living Daylights


The transition of James Bond actors has resulted in a media circus since Sean Connery's original departure from the series after You Only Live Twice (1967). But few generated the intense scrutiny of The Living Daylights (1987), made in the wake of Roger Moore's departure from the role after A View to a Kill (1985). At the time, the 007 series was still sticking to its pattern of a new film every two years, so the rush to find a new actor led to speculation that the role would go to Pierce Brosnan, who was starring in NBC's Remington Steele at the time. The temporary cancellation of that series left Brosnan open to play the role, but the network intervened and decided to keep him on for one final, sixth season. Producer Albert Broccoli's decree to the press that "Remington Steele would not be James Bond" stuck, though Brosnan would go on to inherit the role of Bond in GoldenEye (1995). The shoes of 007 for this adventure ended up being filled by Welsh-born Timothy Dalton, a seasoned stage and screen performer best known for his work with the Royal Shakespeare Company and such films as The Lion in Winter (1968), Flash Gordon (1980) and The Doctor and the Devils (1985).

In keeping with the previous three Moore outings, which also included For Your Eyes Only (1981) and Octopussy (1983), the screenplay by Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson takes inspiration from a short story by 007 creator Ian Fleming. The series had exhausted Fleming's full-length novels with Moonraker (1979), and in this case both the title and the opening defection/attempted assassination sequence came from his 1962 short story, "The Living Daylights." Also carried over from Fleming was the nefarious organization SMERSH, which had been changed into the later SPECTRE in earlier Bond adaptations.

Returning to the fold was director John Glen, who had helmed the last three Bond titles and would repeat again for Dalton's next and final 007 film, Licence to Kill (1989). The recent conflicts in Afghanistan at the time fueled the storyline with multiple double crosses involving arms trading and insurrections in the area involving the Soviets, with Bond helping the local rebellious Taliban-- which, of course, comes off quite a bit different today compared to when the film opened as with the similar Rambo III (1988).

Dalton's intention to go back to the more hard-edged, serious tone of the literary Bond character was met with some resistance at the time among audience members accustomed to the suave and jokey persona of Roger Moore for the past 14 years. The similar approach of Daniel Craig many years later would be met with critical acclaim, but this film still fared well at the box office with much buzz about its production, including an on-set visit from Prince Charles (whose off-camera participation pulled off the "ghetto blaster" scene). Dalton's debut was also the subject of considerable press coverage over his monogamy, a stark contrast to the bed-hopping antics of his predecessors who bedded at least two or three women per film. Apart from an implied liaison at the close of the pre-titles sequence, he's completely chaste through the film and develops a burgeoning romance with his leading lady unseen since the glory days of On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969). The push towards gender equality was mirrored by the fact that--to accompany the then-obligatory Playboy feature for the film (including star Maryam d'Abo)--actor Andreas Wisniewski was prominently showcased in the official movie magazine wearing nothing but a skimpy speedo. Finally, press photographers and reporters also covered an ambitious "flying carpet" scene during the Tangier chase, which was absent from the final cut but has since been included as an extra on home video releases.

This film holds a special place in the hearts of many Bond fans as the final entry scored by John Barry, whose bold, brassy sound had defined the series since its inception. In fact, Barry was musically involved in all but three of the films to that point with hands-on involvement in the title songs as well. Here, he brought a sparing but dramatic electronic presence to the score, which comes to the forefront during action scenes including the rousing "Ice Chase" track. Originally the British duo Pet Shop Boys were rumored to be in the running for the title song, which inspired them to record a demo that ultimately transformed into the track "This Must Be the Place I Waited Years to Leave" on their 1990 album, Behaviour. Instead the song was performed and co-written by Norwegian trio a-Ha, whose creative friction with Barry led to two different studio versions: the string-heavy version heard in the film and a rock variation on their album Stay on These Roads. Despite the bumps in its creation, the song has, like the film itself, gone on to become a fond fan favorite and is often cited as a highlight among one of the screen's most enduring and successful series.

By Nathaniel Thompson
The Living Daylights

The Living Daylights

The transition of James Bond actors has resulted in a media circus since Sean Connery's original departure from the series after You Only Live Twice (1967). But few generated the intense scrutiny of The Living Daylights (1987), made in the wake of Roger Moore's departure from the role after A View to a Kill (1985). At the time, the 007 series was still sticking to its pattern of a new film every two years, so the rush to find a new actor led to speculation that the role would go to Pierce Brosnan, who was starring in NBC's Remington Steele at the time. The temporary cancellation of that series left Brosnan open to play the role, but the network intervened and decided to keep him on for one final, sixth season. Producer Albert Broccoli's decree to the press that "Remington Steele would not be James Bond" stuck, though Brosnan would go on to inherit the role of Bond in GoldenEye (1995). The shoes of 007 for this adventure ended up being filled by Welsh-born Timothy Dalton, a seasoned stage and screen performer best known for his work with the Royal Shakespeare Company and such films as The Lion in Winter (1968), Flash Gordon (1980) and The Doctor and the Devils (1985). In keeping with the previous three Moore outings, which also included For Your Eyes Only (1981) and Octopussy (1983), the screenplay by Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson takes inspiration from a short story by 007 creator Ian Fleming. The series had exhausted Fleming's full-length novels with Moonraker (1979), and in this case both the title and the opening defection/attempted assassination sequence came from his 1962 short story, "The Living Daylights." Also carried over from Fleming was the nefarious organization SMERSH, which had been changed into the later SPECTRE in earlier Bond adaptations. Returning to the fold was director John Glen, who had helmed the last three Bond titles and would repeat again for Dalton's next and final 007 film, Licence to Kill (1989). The recent conflicts in Afghanistan at the time fueled the storyline with multiple double crosses involving arms trading and insurrections in the area involving the Soviets, with Bond helping the local rebellious Taliban-- which, of course, comes off quite a bit different today compared to when the film opened as with the similar Rambo III (1988). Dalton's intention to go back to the more hard-edged, serious tone of the literary Bond character was met with some resistance at the time among audience members accustomed to the suave and jokey persona of Roger Moore for the past 14 years. The similar approach of Daniel Craig many years later would be met with critical acclaim, but this film still fared well at the box office with much buzz about its production, including an on-set visit from Prince Charles (whose off-camera participation pulled off the "ghetto blaster" scene). Dalton's debut was also the subject of considerable press coverage over his monogamy, a stark contrast to the bed-hopping antics of his predecessors who bedded at least two or three women per film. Apart from an implied liaison at the close of the pre-titles sequence, he's completely chaste through the film and develops a burgeoning romance with his leading lady unseen since the glory days of On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969). The push towards gender equality was mirrored by the fact that--to accompany the then-obligatory Playboy feature for the film (including star Maryam d'Abo)--actor Andreas Wisniewski was prominently showcased in the official movie magazine wearing nothing but a skimpy speedo. Finally, press photographers and reporters also covered an ambitious "flying carpet" scene during the Tangier chase, which was absent from the final cut but has since been included as an extra on home video releases. This film holds a special place in the hearts of many Bond fans as the final entry scored by John Barry, whose bold, brassy sound had defined the series since its inception. In fact, Barry was musically involved in all but three of the films to that point with hands-on involvement in the title songs as well. Here, he brought a sparing but dramatic electronic presence to the score, which comes to the forefront during action scenes including the rousing "Ice Chase" track. Originally the British duo Pet Shop Boys were rumored to be in the running for the title song, which inspired them to record a demo that ultimately transformed into the track "This Must Be the Place I Waited Years to Leave" on their 1990 album, Behaviour. Instead the song was performed and co-written by Norwegian trio a-Ha, whose creative friction with Barry led to two different studio versions: the string-heavy version heard in the film and a rock variation on their album Stay on These Roads. Despite the bumps in its creation, the song has, like the film itself, gone on to become a fond fan favorite and is often cited as a highlight among one of the screen's most enduring and successful series. By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video March 1988

Released in United States Summer July 31, 1987

Formerly distributed by CBS/Fox Video.

Released in United States on Video March 1988

Released in United States Summer July 31, 1987