The Running Man


1h 41m 1987

Brief Synopsis

In post-apocalyptic, totalitarian America of the 21st century, policeman Ben Richards is framed for a crime he did not commit. Ben escapes from jail, determined to prove his innocence, but is captured. As punishment, he is teamed with a woman named Amber Mendez and forced to participate in a violent TV game show called The Running Man. The two "contestants" face what is most likely a public execution, as they run a gauntlet of assassins armed with chainsaws and other brutal weapons. They can win the contest and obtain their freedom...if they survive.

Film Details

Also Known As
Running Man
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Hollywood Center Studios, Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Synopsis

In post-apocalyptic, totalitarian America of the 21st century, policeman Ben Richards is framed for a crime he did not commit. Ben escapes from jail, determined to prove his innocence, but is captured. As punishment, he is teamed with a woman named Amber Mendez and forced to participate in a violent TV game show called The Running Man. The two "contestants" face what is most likely a public execution, as they run a gauntlet of assassins armed with chainsaws and other brutal weapons. They can win the contest and obtain their freedom...if they survive.

Crew

Paula Abdul

Choreographer

Steven Abeyta

Grip

John A Amicarella

Assistant Editor

David Anderberg

Grip

James M Anderson

Camera Operator

Michael Arbogast

Special Effects

Rémi Aubuchon

Video

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Henry Baghdassarian

Wardrobe

Michael Bailey

Other

Glenn Barbee

Song Performer

Glenn Barbee

Song

Keith Barish

Executive Producer

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Douglas E Beal

Assistant Camera Operator

Ariel Bello

Production Assistant

Richard Berger

Set Designer

Frankie Bergman

Hair

Bill Bernstein

Music Editor

Robert Blackman

Costume Designer

Destiny Borden

Assistant Editor

Kenneth Borland

Grip

Tim Bowen

Video

Tim Bowen

Effects Assistant

Max Brehme

Swing Gang

Marc Brickman

Lighting

Dan Bronson

Costumes

Anthony Brubaker

Stunts

Jackie Burch

Casting

Hugh Byrne

Production

Dawn Leduke Calcaterra

Assistant

Mark Cane

Grip

Jim Canepa

Caterer

Paul Carden

Sound Editor

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Chris Casady

Special Effects

Larry Cavanaugh

Special Effects Coordinator

James J Cavarretta

Sound

Kenneth C Clark

Special Effects

Larry E Clark

Set Decorator

Robert L Clark

Other

Al Cleland

Stunts

William B Clevenger

Assistant Camera Operator

John S Coffey

Sound

Rob Cohen

Executive Producer

Jack T. Collis

Production Designer

Rhonda Columb

Assistant

Erik Cord

Stunts

James M. Cox

Other

Thomas R Cranham

Storyboard Artist

Mike Cunningham

Props

Gary D Daigler

Unit Production Manager

Billy Damota

Casting Associate

Jeff Dawn

Makeup

Steven E. De Souza

Screenplay

David Degeus

Adr Editor

Thomas Del Ruth

Director Of Photography

Mike Derosier

Swing Gang

John Desjardin

Video

Dennis Dewaay

Construction Coordinator

Bryan Dirickson

Caterer

Bennie Dobbins

Stunt Coordinator

Mike Dobie

Sound Editor

Gary R Dodd

Key Grip

Dean Drabin

Foley Mixer

Irvin E Jim Duffy

Set Decorator

George Dunagan

Other

Jim Dunn

Grip

Syd Dutton

Other

Louis Eaquinta

Visual Effects

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Bradley Thomas Emmons

Other

Manny Epstein

Special Effects

Harold Faltermeyer

Song

Harold Faltermeyer

Music

Steven E Fegley

Other

Rick Fichter

Director Of Photography

Carl Fischer

Boom Operator

Brian Fong

Dga Trainee

Harrison Fong

Storyboard Artist

Richard C Franklin

Sound Editor

Walt Fraser

Assistant Camera

Vaune Kirby Frechette

Assistant Editor

Dave Freeman

Electrician

Larry Freeman

Best Boy

David Friedman

Photography

Steve Gardner

Production

John Gazdik

Camera Assistant

Steve Gilbard

Electrician

Diana Wooten Goodman

Video Playback

Richard Bryce Goodman

Sound Mixer

Robert H Grasmere

Video

Whitney Green

Production Manager

Rhonda Gunner

Graphics

Rhonda Gunner

Video

Gary Gutierrez

Visual Effects Supervisor

Campbel Hair

Electrician

Steve Hastings

Electrician

Gary Hecker

Foley

Don Heitzer

Assistant Director

Ron High

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Hirsch

Electrician

Tim Hoggatt

Adr Mixer

Richard Hollander

Graphics

Richard Hollander

Video

Spike Allison Hooper

Sound Editor

Alison Howard-smith

Other

Alison Howard-smith

Production Assistant

Alan Howarth

Sound

Jeff Howell

Casting

Joseph E Hubbard

Assistant Art Director

Jerry Irvine

Effects Coordinator

Guy Jackson

Other

Jackie Jackson

Song Performer

Jackie Jackson

Song

Merle Jackson

Production Coordinator

Francine Jamison-tanchuck

Costume Department

David Jansen

Assistant Editor

Jeff Jensen

Stunts

Rob M Johnson

Transportation

Tom Johnson

Other

Carlton Jones

Choreographer

Joanie D Jones

Assistant

Petko Kadiev

Storyboard Artist

David G Kantar

Assistant

Jack Keller

Sound

Douglas Kennedy

Electrician

David Kern

Sound Editor

James J Keys

Other

Stephen King

Source Material (From Novel)

Rick Kline

Sound

Jan Koshay

Dolly Grip

Luca Kouimelis

Script Supervisor

Joel Kramer

Stunts

Bobbe P Kurtz

Adr Editor

Shawn Lane

Stunts

Kevin J. Lang

Rigging Gaffer

Steve Laporte

Makeup

A P Lawrence

Electrician

Greg Lazzaro

Location Manager

William D Lee

Special Effects

George Linder

Producer

Willard O Livingston

Props

Willard O Livingston

Mechanical Special Effects

Michael J Long

Costumes

Ray Lopez

Other

Bill Maley

Key Grip

Michael Maley

Gaffer

Dave Margolin

Sign Writer

Lynn Marks

Assistant

James Marsala

Grip

Pete Martinez

Video

Jim Mccoy

Makeup

Steven C. Mcgee

Best Boy

John Mcleod

Special Effects

Gregory L Mcmurry

Video

Gregory L Mcmurry

Graphics

George G Miller

Other

Paul Miranne

Grip

Donald O Mitchell

Sound

Margaret A Mitchell

Production Accountant

Robert Ken Miyamoto

Grip

Christopher Napolitano

Other

Nick Navarro

Set Designer

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Mel Neiman

Sound

Alan L Nineberg

Adr Editor

Bob Noland

Color Timer

Gene Nollmann

Assistant Art Director

Bob O'brien

Sound Editor

Kevin O'connell

Sound

Thomas J. O'connell

Adr Mixer

Joseph R Olsen

Props

David Page

Assistant

Joe Pancake

Craft Service

Phillip Pappas

Grip

Bunny Parker

Hair

Robert Lansing Parker

Casting

John Parr

Song

John Parr

Song Performer

Nancy Patton

Set Designer

Erich Todd Petrie

Grip

Ed Piwowarski

Other

Karen Price

Stunts

Kevin S Quibell

Special Effects

Steven Ramirez

Assistant Editor

Isidoro Raponi

Mechanical Special Effects

Isidoro Raponi

Props

Mark Rappaport

Visual Effects

Charles H Ray

Special Effects

Brian Reeves

Music

Mike Revell

Accounting Assistant

Margaret Rezaie

Wardrobe

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Paul Bruce Richardson

Sound Editor

Pattee Roedig

Other

Charles E Rogers

Other

Rod Rogers

Adr Editor

Mitch Romanauski

Visual Effects

Frank Rose

Costumes

Film Details

Also Known As
Running Man
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Hollywood Center Studios, Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Articles

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)


Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71.

He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin.

For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing.

He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch.

After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies.

Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian.

A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own.

After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan.

by Michael "Mitch" Toole
Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71. He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin. For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing. He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch. After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies. Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian. A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own. After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan. by Michael "Mitch" Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1987

Released in United States on Video May 25, 1988

Re-released in United States on Video May 9, 1995

Arnold Schwarzenegger replaced Christopher Reeve in the lead role.

Formerly distributed by Vestron Video.

Began shooting September 29, 1986.

Re-released in United States on Video May 9, 1995

Released in United States on Video May 25, 1988

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1987