Firewalker


1h 50m 1986

Brief Synopsis

An adventurer goes in search of lost treasure in a Guatemalan gold mine.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Release Date
1986
Location
Churubusco Studios, Mexico City, Mexico; Puerta Vallarta, Mexico; Morelos, Mexico; Durango, Mexico; Torreon, Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Synopsis

An adventurer goes in search of lost treasure in a Guatemalan gold mine.

Crew

Reyes Abades

Special Effects Supervisor

Laura Aguilar

Location Manager

Norman Aladjem

Story By

Norman Aladjem

From Story

Norman Aladjem

Executive Producer

Bobby Angelle

Stunts

Maricarmen Araiza

Other

Rick Avery

Stunts

Wenden K Baldwin

Titles

Enedina Bernal

Wardrobe Supervisor

Miguel Blanco

Best Boy

Ilona Bobak

Makeup

Ilona Bobak

Hair

Clay Boss

Stunts

Martin Bram

Sound Editor

Debi Britt-mathis

Production Assistant

Pablo Buelna

Unit Production Manager

Barney Cabral

Sound Editor

Patrick Cabral

Sound Editor

Ken Caillat

Music

Jose Campos

Grip

Poppy Cannon

Assistant

Poppy Cannon

Set Decorator

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Guillermo Carreno

Assistant Director

Javier Carreno

Assistant Director

Federico Castillo

Wardrobe Supervisor

Julio Cepeda

Property Master Assistant

Gary Chang

Music

Javier Chinchilla

Assistant Director

Phil Chung

Stunts

Karin Cooper

Script Supervisor

Daniel Cordero

Special Effects

Manuel Cordero

Special Effects

Anne Couk

Other

Bobby Cummins

Stunts

Jack Daro

Music

Zack Davis

Sound Editor

Donaciano Deanda

Gaffer

Mike Deluna

Stunts

Don Digirolamo

Sound

Mike Dobie

Sound Editor

Jon Epstein

Stunts

Paula Erickson

Music Supervisor

Raul Esquivel

Hair

Dean Ferrandini

Stunts

Gerardo Flores

Assistant Camera Operator

Carlos Gil

Associate Producer

Miguel Gil

Assistant

Andy Gill

Stunts

Robert W Glass

Sound

Yoram Globus

Producer

Menahem Golan

Producer

Rosa Maria Gomez

Accountant

Robert Gosnell

From Story

Robert Gosnell

Screenplay

Robert Gosnell

Story By

Jose Rodriguez Granada

Production Designer

Russ Harling

Assistant Director

Juvenal Herrera

Electrician

Mark Hollingsworth

Sound Editor

Ruben Huerta

Electrician

Howard Jackson

Assistant

Jerry Jacobson

Adr Editor

Sergio Jara

Special Effects Coordinator

Ishmael Jardin

Wardrobe Assistant

Manuel Jiminez

Assistant Camera Operator

Mary E Jochem

Assistant Editor

Mike Johnson

Stunts

Jimmy Jones

Transportation Coordinator

Sonny Jones

Stunts

Enid L Kantor

Production Coordinator

Robert Knudson

Sound

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Enrique Lechuga

Camera

Russ Livingston

Associate Editor

Alberto Lopez

Makeup

Pina Lozada

Hair

Juan Luna

Key Grip

Robert Macdonald

Casting

Fernando M Martinez

Assistant Art Director

Richard Marx

Editor

Enrique Medina

Assistant Set Dresser

Carlos Montano

Camera Operator

Gary Mundheim

Sound Editor

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Kurt Taylor Neishloss

Music

Aaron Norris

Stunt Coordinator

Jorge Palomino

Boom Operator

Michael Paris

Photography

Asuncion Perez

Grip

Alex Phillips

Other

Alex Phillips

Director Of Photography

Gary Pike

Stunts

Rick Prieto

Stunts

Carlos Puente

Assistant Editor

Jose Quintanar

Location Manager

Fabienne Rawley

Apprentice

Joel Renfro

Transportation Coordinator

Branscombe Richmond

Stunts

Danny Rodgers

Stunts

Jeffrey M Rosenbaum

Story By

Jeffrey M Rosenbaum

From Story

Jeffrey M Rosenbaum

Executive Producer

Angelo Russo

Color Timer

Alfredo Ruvalcaba

Photography

Angel Sanchez

Boom Operator

Steve Schacter

Dialogue Coach

Kyle Seidenbaum

Titles

Salvador Serrano

Dolly Grip

Erica Shaevitz

Assistant Editor

Charles Simmons

Associate Editor

Michael R Sloan

Post-Production Supervisor

Fernando Solorio

On-Set Dresser

Jose Fernando Solorio

Assistant Set Dresser

Kleomenes Stamatiades

Set Decorator

Bruce Stambler

Sound Editor

Lydia Telo

Production Accountant

Sergio Garcia Terrazas

Camera

Peter Lee Thompson

Executive Editor

Alfonso Godinez Trejo

Property Master

Justine Vacco

Sound Editor

Grace Valenti

Assistant Editor

Roberto Vega

Generator Operator

Anne-marie Vitello

Negative Cutting

Ron Vitello

Negative Cutting

Bob Wall

Stunts

Fred Wasser

Sound Editor

Ted Whitfield

Music Editor

Michael Wilhoit

Sound Editor

Richard E Yawn

Sound Editor

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Release Date
1986
Location
Churubusco Studios, Mexico City, Mexico; Puerta Vallarta, Mexico; Morelos, Mexico; Durango, Mexico; Torreon, Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Articles

TCM Remembers - J. Lee Thompson


TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002

Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989.

KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002

The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas."

Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993).

Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry.

Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia.

TCM REMEMBERS LEO MCKERN, 1920-2002

The recent death of Leo McKern, 82, marked the passing of one of Britain's finest and most respected character actors. He was suffering from ill health in recent years and was moved to a nursing home a few weeks before his death on July 23 2002 in Bath, England. An actor of commanding presence with a deep-throated voice, the portly, bulbous-nosed McKern had a long, distinguished career spanning more than half a century, earning numerous plaudits along the way in all major mediums: theatre, film and television.

Born Reginald McKern on March 16, 1920 in Sydney, Australia; he served with the Australian Army during World War II and worked in regional theatre in his native Sydney before immigrating to England in 1946. It was a slow start, but after a three-year apprenticeship of painting scenery, stage-managing and acting, McKern eventually joined the celebrated Old Vic theatrical company in 1949 and proved one of the more versatile actors in the troupe tackling diverse roles in comedy, the classics and serious contemporary parts.

His film debut came in Murder in the Cathedral (1952) but it took a few years before he made his mark in cinema. Some of his best film work included roles as Peter Sellers' comic henchman in the classic satire The Mouse That Roared (1959); a bungling train robber in the charming Disney film The Horse Without a Head (1963); a nefarious professor who kills off his colleagues for amusement in the brilliant black comedy A Jolly Bad Fellow (1964); Clang, a cartoonish villain in the Beatles' pop film Help! (1965); Cromwell, the persecutor of Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons (1966) and as Thomas Ryan in the David Lean drama, Ryan's Daughter (1970).

Yet despite all the accolades McKern earned in theatre and films, it was television where he foundinternational fame as the wily, irascible barrister Horace P. Rumpole in John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey in 1975. Infusing the character with beguiling skill and energy, McKern made the acerbic, wine swilling, Tennyson-quoting Rumpole a much loved figure that was adored by critics, audiences and even its creator Mortimer. Perhaps Mortimer offered the most fitting tribute when he once referred to McKern - "His acting exists where I always hope my writing will be: about two feet above the ground, a little larger than life, but always taking off from reality." Enough said.

By Michael T. Toole

Tcm Remembers - J. Lee Thompson

TCM Remembers - J. Lee Thompson

TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002 Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989. KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002 The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas." Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993). Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry. Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia. TCM REMEMBERS LEO MCKERN, 1920-2002 The recent death of Leo McKern, 82, marked the passing of one of Britain's finest and most respected character actors. He was suffering from ill health in recent years and was moved to a nursing home a few weeks before his death on July 23 2002 in Bath, England. An actor of commanding presence with a deep-throated voice, the portly, bulbous-nosed McKern had a long, distinguished career spanning more than half a century, earning numerous plaudits along the way in all major mediums: theatre, film and television. Born Reginald McKern on March 16, 1920 in Sydney, Australia; he served with the Australian Army during World War II and worked in regional theatre in his native Sydney before immigrating to England in 1946. It was a slow start, but after a three-year apprenticeship of painting scenery, stage-managing and acting, McKern eventually joined the celebrated Old Vic theatrical company in 1949 and proved one of the more versatile actors in the troupe tackling diverse roles in comedy, the classics and serious contemporary parts. His film debut came in Murder in the Cathedral (1952) but it took a few years before he made his mark in cinema. Some of his best film work included roles as Peter Sellers' comic henchman in the classic satire The Mouse That Roared (1959); a bungling train robber in the charming Disney film The Horse Without a Head (1963); a nefarious professor who kills off his colleagues for amusement in the brilliant black comedy A Jolly Bad Fellow (1964); Clang, a cartoonish villain in the Beatles' pop film Help! (1965); Cromwell, the persecutor of Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons (1966) and as Thomas Ryan in the David Lean drama, Ryan's Daughter (1970). Yet despite all the accolades McKern earned in theatre and films, it was television where he foundinternational fame as the wily, irascible barrister Horace P. Rumpole in John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey in 1975. Infusing the character with beguiling skill and energy, McKern made the acerbic, wine swilling, Tennyson-quoting Rumpole a much loved figure that was adored by critics, audiences and even its creator Mortimer. Perhaps Mortimer offered the most fitting tribute when he once referred to McKern - "His acting exists where I always hope my writing will be: about two feet above the ground, a little larger than life, but always taking off from reality." Enough said. By Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1986

Began shooting June 9, 1986.

Completed shooting September 5, 1986.

television extract "I Love Lucy"

Todd-AO

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1986