Gator


1h 55m 1976
Gator

Brief Synopsis

An ex-con joins forces with a federal agent to bring down a vice lord.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Crime
Sequel
Release Date
1976

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

An ex-con joins forces with a federal agent to bring down a vice lord.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Crime
Sequel
Release Date
1976

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Gator


In the middle of the 1970's, before Star Wars (1977) changed everything, light-hearted action and adventure movies were scarce. If you wanted to take a break from the latest Coppola or Scorsese masterpiece with some Hollywood excitement that would not tax your brain, there were two men you wanted to see: Clint Eastwood or Burt Reynolds.

Reynolds' movies were the lighter of the two, combining roughneck action with a sly sense of humor that whiled away a summer afternoon in the time of bell-bottoms and leisure suits. Gator (1976) was Reynolds' entry for the year of America's Bicentennial, a sequel to his hit movie of three summers earlier White Lightning (1973).

In this edition, ex-convict Gator McKlusky (Burt Reynolds) is blackmailed into helping the Feds go after his high school buddy Bama McCall (Jerry Reed), now a corrupt political boss who runs all the crime in Dunston County including a brothel staffed with underage girls. Accompanying Gator on his mission is TV reporter/love interest Aggie Maybank (Lauren Hutton) and FBI agent Irving Greenfield (Jack Weston). Many cars and boats are chased and wrecked before justice is meted out to the bad guys.

White Lightning was, at one time, going to be Steven Spielberg's big screen debut. For the sequel, Reynolds kept the reins in his own hands and made his own first film, starring as well as directing. Some critics noted a similarity in style between Reynolds' direction of Gator and that of director Robert Aldrich who had recently worked with Reynolds on The Longest Yard (1974) and Hustle (1975). Both directors feature sudden shifts of tone from comedy to violence in their films.

Jerry Reed, who the next year would star with Reynolds in one of the 1970's most popular movies, Smokey and the Bandit (1977), does well handling the villain's role despite Gator being his second acting job. Mike Douglas, the talk show host, does him one better, making his acting debut here in the role of the Governor.

Gator is a fun example of an often ignored side of seventies cinema when good ol' boys were king and summer action movies meant fast guns and smashed cars, not exploding pixels and costumed superheroes.

Director: Burt Reynolds
Producers: Arthur Gardner, Jules Levy
Writer: William W. Norton
Cinematography: William A. Fraker
Music: Charles Bernstein
Editing: Harold F. Kress
Art Direction: Kirk Axtell
Cast: Burt Reynolds (Gator McKlusky), Lauren Hutton (Aggie Maybank), Jack Weston (Irving Greenfield), Jerry Reed (Bama McCall), Alice Ghostley (Emmeline Cavanaugh), Dub Taylor (Mayor Caffrey).
C-115m. Letterboxed.

by Brian Cady
Gator

Gator

In the middle of the 1970's, before Star Wars (1977) changed everything, light-hearted action and adventure movies were scarce. If you wanted to take a break from the latest Coppola or Scorsese masterpiece with some Hollywood excitement that would not tax your brain, there were two men you wanted to see: Clint Eastwood or Burt Reynolds. Reynolds' movies were the lighter of the two, combining roughneck action with a sly sense of humor that whiled away a summer afternoon in the time of bell-bottoms and leisure suits. Gator (1976) was Reynolds' entry for the year of America's Bicentennial, a sequel to his hit movie of three summers earlier White Lightning (1973). In this edition, ex-convict Gator McKlusky (Burt Reynolds) is blackmailed into helping the Feds go after his high school buddy Bama McCall (Jerry Reed), now a corrupt political boss who runs all the crime in Dunston County including a brothel staffed with underage girls. Accompanying Gator on his mission is TV reporter/love interest Aggie Maybank (Lauren Hutton) and FBI agent Irving Greenfield (Jack Weston). Many cars and boats are chased and wrecked before justice is meted out to the bad guys. White Lightning was, at one time, going to be Steven Spielberg's big screen debut. For the sequel, Reynolds kept the reins in his own hands and made his own first film, starring as well as directing. Some critics noted a similarity in style between Reynolds' direction of Gator and that of director Robert Aldrich who had recently worked with Reynolds on The Longest Yard (1974) and Hustle (1975). Both directors feature sudden shifts of tone from comedy to violence in their films. Jerry Reed, who the next year would star with Reynolds in one of the 1970's most popular movies, Smokey and the Bandit (1977), does well handling the villain's role despite Gator being his second acting job. Mike Douglas, the talk show host, does him one better, making his acting debut here in the role of the Governor. Gator is a fun example of an often ignored side of seventies cinema when good ol' boys were king and summer action movies meant fast guns and smashed cars, not exploding pixels and costumed superheroes. Director: Burt Reynolds Producers: Arthur Gardner, Jules Levy Writer: William W. Norton Cinematography: William A. Fraker Music: Charles Bernstein Editing: Harold F. Kress Art Direction: Kirk Axtell Cast: Burt Reynolds (Gator McKlusky), Lauren Hutton (Aggie Maybank), Jack Weston (Irving Greenfield), Jerry Reed (Bama McCall), Alice Ghostley (Emmeline Cavanaugh), Dub Taylor (Mayor Caffrey). C-115m. Letterboxed. by Brian Cady

Quotes

I'm going undercover in Dunson County.
- Irving
Undercover? You're gonna stick out like a bagel in a bowl of grits.
- Gator
Guys named Gator and Bama. Don't you people down here have normal names?
- Irving
You mean like Yogi?
- Gator
You charmed the shirt right off my back.
- Aggy
Take off Uncle Hunzie's hat.
- Gator

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1976

Released in United States on Video January 10, 1989

Todd-AO

Released in United States 1976

Released in United States on Video January 10, 1989