Kid Galahad


1h 35m 1962
Kid Galahad

Brief Synopsis

A ruthless fight promoter tries to turn a singing mechanic into a champion.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Action
Musical
Sports
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1962
Premiere Information
Atlanta opening: 1 Aug 1962
Production Company
The Mirisch Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kid Galahad by Francis Wallace (Boston, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

Following his service in the Army, Walter Gulick takes a job as a sparring partner in a Catskill training camp run by Willy Grogan and his girl friend, Dolly. Willy decides to turn Walter into a professional fighter over Dolly's objections. The lad earns the nickname "Kid Galahad" by rescuing Dolly from gangsters to whom Willy is in debt. After a series of sensational victories, Walter decides to give up boxing and settle down with Willy's sister, Rose. Upon hearing the news the gangsters warn Willy that his man must not be permitted to win his last bout, and they match him against Sugar-Boy Romero, a highly experienced fighter. Believing Willy guilty of having arranged the match for spite, Dolly walks out on him. Before the fight, Walter's trainer is offered $500 not to work in his corner. When he refuses the bribe, the hoodlums break his fingers. Walter arrives on the scene and, after a skirmish with the gangsters, goes into the ring. Despite a severe beating, he knocks out his opponent. Dolly returns to Willy, and Walter is free to marry Rose and open an auto repair shop.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Action
Musical
Sports
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1962
Premiere Information
Atlanta opening: 1 Aug 1962
Production Company
The Mirisch Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kid Galahad by Francis Wallace (Boston, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

Kid Galahad (1962)


For Elvis' tenth feature, Paramount researched Hollywood's golden era for a potential remake vehicle and came up with Kid Galahad (1962) which had been a box office winner for Warner Brothers in 1937. It was based on a Saturday Evening Post story and starred Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis, and Wayne Morris as an up-and-coming boxer. Not wanting to let a good idea die, Warner Brothers recycled the plot as The Wagons Roll at Night in 1941 and gave it a circus backdrop with Humphrey Bogart once again taking a leading role. In 1962 Paramount bought the rights and fine-tuned the premise for an Elvis film while Warner Brothers changed the title of their original 1937 version to The Battling Bellhop for television showings so it wouldn't be confused with the new Presley version. Although Kid Galahad has all the cliches you'd expect a good boxing flick to have, it also throws in a romance with Joan Blackman and several musical numbers ("King of the Whole Wide World," "I Got Lucky," etc.) for Elvis fans. For the record, Presley plays Walter Gulick, a fresh-faced army veteran who returns to his hometown to start his own auto repair business. But first he needs some financing so he agrees to box for money at a Catskill training camp. The camp owner (Gig Young) is a gambler in debt to some mobsters and before you know it, Elvis finds himself being set up for a brutal beating.

One of the highlights for Elvis in making Kid Galahad was getting to train with former world welterweight champion Mushy Callahan and his assistant Al Silvani, who was a trainer for Floyd Patterson and Rocky Graziano. A young undefeated welterweight boxer named Orlando De La Fuente was also cast in the film as Elvis' opponent, Sugarboy Romero. Kid Galahad is also notable as the film debut of Edward Asner and for its location filming in Idyllwild, California, a popular resort ninety miles east of Los Angeles, which is an effective stand-in for the Catskill town in the film.

On the downside, Elvis wasn't happy with his appearance during the filming of Kid Galahad (he weighed almost 200 pounds which was well over his normal weight at the time) and he didn't care for co-star Charles Bronson, cast in the role of his loyal trainer. The latter was unimpressed with Presley's off screen karate demonstrations and Elvis was equally dismissive, referring to Bronson as a "muscle-bound ape." But you'd never guess there was any tension between the two actors from watching the film.

According to Albert Goldman in his biography, Elvis, Colonel Tom Parker, Elvis' manager, was also a troublemaker on the set, though for different reasons:
"During the shooting of Kid Galahad....the Colonel hypnotized Elvis's bodyguard, Sonny West, and instructed him to walk up to the film's director, Phil Karlson, and tell him that the movie stank, the acting was horrible, the direction disgusting and the whole production a terrible waste of time and money. As soon as the next break came, big, burly Sonny walked up to the director and launched into this outrageously insulting speech. The director's jaw dropped open in shock and remained hanging there while the Colonel drank in the scene, chuckling deep inside this mountainous belly without betraying his feelings on his face. Finally, Karlson screamed: "Who is this man? Get him off the set!" When the joke was explained to him, the director expressed astonishment that Sonny could have performed the prank at such length without ever once cracking a smile. "He was under hypnosis," explained the Colonel; "he couldn't have done it any other way." Turning to Sonny, the director demanded: "Is this true?" "Yes, sir, it is," avowed Sonny, who could never imagine how he performed all the strange and embarrassing feats he accomplished under the Colonel's direction."

So now we know why Elvis made all those bad films. He was HYPNOTIZED by the Colonel! Actually, in terms of Elvis's career at MGM, Kid Galahad is definitely one of his better efforts, due in part to an excellent supporting cast which includes Lola Albright and Gig Young and the expert direction of B-movie specialist, Phil Karlson.

Director: Phil Karlson
Producer: David Weisbart
Screenplay: William Fay, story by Francis Wallace
Cinematography: Burnett Guffey
Editor: Stuart Gilmore
Art Direction: Cary Odell
Music: Jeff Alexander
Cast: Elvis Presley (Walter Gulick), Gig Young (Willy Grogan), Lola Albright (Dolly Fletcher), Joan Blackman (Rose Grogan), Charles Bronson (Lew Nyack), David Lewis (Otto Danzig), Ned Glass (Max Lieberman), Robert Emhardt (Maynard).
C-97m. Close captioning. Letterboxed.

by Jeff Stafford

Kid Galahad (1962)

Kid Galahad (1962)

For Elvis' tenth feature, Paramount researched Hollywood's golden era for a potential remake vehicle and came up with Kid Galahad (1962) which had been a box office winner for Warner Brothers in 1937. It was based on a Saturday Evening Post story and starred Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis, and Wayne Morris as an up-and-coming boxer. Not wanting to let a good idea die, Warner Brothers recycled the plot as The Wagons Roll at Night in 1941 and gave it a circus backdrop with Humphrey Bogart once again taking a leading role. In 1962 Paramount bought the rights and fine-tuned the premise for an Elvis film while Warner Brothers changed the title of their original 1937 version to The Battling Bellhop for television showings so it wouldn't be confused with the new Presley version. Although Kid Galahad has all the cliches you'd expect a good boxing flick to have, it also throws in a romance with Joan Blackman and several musical numbers ("King of the Whole Wide World," "I Got Lucky," etc.) for Elvis fans. For the record, Presley plays Walter Gulick, a fresh-faced army veteran who returns to his hometown to start his own auto repair business. But first he needs some financing so he agrees to box for money at a Catskill training camp. The camp owner (Gig Young) is a gambler in debt to some mobsters and before you know it, Elvis finds himself being set up for a brutal beating. One of the highlights for Elvis in making Kid Galahad was getting to train with former world welterweight champion Mushy Callahan and his assistant Al Silvani, who was a trainer for Floyd Patterson and Rocky Graziano. A young undefeated welterweight boxer named Orlando De La Fuente was also cast in the film as Elvis' opponent, Sugarboy Romero. Kid Galahad is also notable as the film debut of Edward Asner and for its location filming in Idyllwild, California, a popular resort ninety miles east of Los Angeles, which is an effective stand-in for the Catskill town in the film. On the downside, Elvis wasn't happy with his appearance during the filming of Kid Galahad (he weighed almost 200 pounds which was well over his normal weight at the time) and he didn't care for co-star Charles Bronson, cast in the role of his loyal trainer. The latter was unimpressed with Presley's off screen karate demonstrations and Elvis was equally dismissive, referring to Bronson as a "muscle-bound ape." But you'd never guess there was any tension between the two actors from watching the film. According to Albert Goldman in his biography, Elvis, Colonel Tom Parker, Elvis' manager, was also a troublemaker on the set, though for different reasons: "During the shooting of Kid Galahad....the Colonel hypnotized Elvis's bodyguard, Sonny West, and instructed him to walk up to the film's director, Phil Karlson, and tell him that the movie stank, the acting was horrible, the direction disgusting and the whole production a terrible waste of time and money. As soon as the next break came, big, burly Sonny walked up to the director and launched into this outrageously insulting speech. The director's jaw dropped open in shock and remained hanging there while the Colonel drank in the scene, chuckling deep inside this mountainous belly without betraying his feelings on his face. Finally, Karlson screamed: "Who is this man? Get him off the set!" When the joke was explained to him, the director expressed astonishment that Sonny could have performed the prank at such length without ever once cracking a smile. "He was under hypnosis," explained the Colonel; "he couldn't have done it any other way." Turning to Sonny, the director demanded: "Is this true?" "Yes, sir, it is," avowed Sonny, who could never imagine how he performed all the strange and embarrassing feats he accomplished under the Colonel's direction." So now we know why Elvis made all those bad films. He was HYPNOTIZED by the Colonel! Actually, in terms of Elvis's career at MGM, Kid Galahad is definitely one of his better efforts, due in part to an excellent supporting cast which includes Lola Albright and Gig Young and the expert direction of B-movie specialist, Phil Karlson. Director: Phil Karlson Producer: David Weisbart Screenplay: William Fay, story by Francis Wallace Cinematography: Burnett Guffey Editor: Stuart Gilmore Art Direction: Cary Odell Music: Jeff Alexander Cast: Elvis Presley (Walter Gulick), Gig Young (Willy Grogan), Lola Albright (Dolly Fletcher), Joan Blackman (Rose Grogan), Charles Bronson (Lew Nyack), David Lewis (Otto Danzig), Ned Glass (Max Lieberman), Robert Emhardt (Maynard). C-97m. Close captioning. Letterboxed. by Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Location scenes filmed in California. Previously filmed by Warner Bros. in 1937.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988

Released in United States Summer August 1962

Remake of the 1937 version starring Edward G Robinson and Humphrey Bogart, directed by Michael Curtiz.

Released in United States Summer August 1962

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988