Hero And The Terror


1h 36m 1988

Brief Synopsis

A serial killer escapes from prison.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Arrangement; Bruce Alan Murphy; Completion Bond Company Inc; Keylite Production Services, Inc.; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Viacom
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

A serial killer escapes from prison.

Crew

Michael Alden

Post-Production Supervisor

Dale Alexander

Key Grip

Trent Geoffrey Anderson

Dolly Grip

Rick Avery

Stunts

David Azzoto

Keylite Electrician

Brydon Bertram Baker Iii

Boom Operator

Wenden K Baldwin

Title Design

Darin Barrow

Electrician

Randy Baughman

Carpenter

Matt Bearson

2nd Assistant Director

Michael Blodgett

Source Material (From Novel)

Michael Blodgett

Screenwriter

Ilona Bobak

Hairstyles (Chuck Norris)

Ilona Bobak

Makeup

Clay Boss

Stunts

Dan Bradley

Stunts

Eddie Braun

Stunts

Randy Braverman

Apprentice Editor

Charles Brewer

Stunts

Ed Brewer

Property Master

Bob F Brown

Stunts

Ken Brown

Sound Transfers

Robert Bruce

Bestboy Electrician

Frank Bueno

1st Assistant Director

Jeff Burman

Sound Editor

Hal Burton

Stunts

Mark S Cafolla

Sound Editor Apprentice

Tina Canny

Sound Recording Mixer

Allen Cappuccilli

2nd Assistant Editor

Angella Carlyle

Other

M Ginanne Carpenter

Production Coordinator Assistant

Don Ciana

Color Timer

Tony Cocke

Other

Alison Cornyn

Art Department Assistant

Diane Crespo

Production Auditor Assistant

Jimmy Cullen

Costumer Assistant

Bob K Cummings

Stunts

David H Cunningham

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Patrick Cyccone Jr.

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Patricia Danver

Location Assistant

Bud Davis

Stunts

Zack Davis

Sound Editor

Michael Deluna

Stunts

Douglas B Dick

Art Director

David Efron

Stunts

John Eggett

Special Effects

Paul Einstein

Set Dresser

Jon Epstein

Stunt Coordinator

Brett Ericson

Sound Transfers

Annette E Fabrizi

Hairstyles

Annette E Fabrizi

Makeup

Rick Fee

1st Assistant Camera

Marc S. Fischer

Executive In Charge Of Production

Kurt N Forshager

Sound Editor 1st Assistant

David Michael Frank

Song

David Frank

Song ("Two Can Be One")

David Michael Frank

Music

David Frank

Music

Tony Garber

Sound Editor Supervisor

Katy Garretson

Dga Trainee

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Greg Gault

Stunts

Yoram Globus

Executive Producer

Menahem Golan

Executive Producer

Archer Goodman

Location Manager

Tommy Goodwin

Adr Mixer

Tommy Goodwin

Foley Mixer

Holger Gross

Production Designer

Barbara A Hall

Production Coordinator

Joachim H Hansch

Music Supervisor

Nancy Banta Hansen

Script Supervisor

Kenn Harris

Other

Mark Haskins

Art Direction

Rosine Ace Hatem

Stunts

Robert Hedland

1st Assistant Editor

Mark Heiner

Property Master Assistant

Fred Hess

Production Assistant

Howard Jackson

Trainer (Chuck Norris)

Alain Jakubowicz

Post-Production Supervisor

Robert Jason

Lyrics ("Two Can Be One")

Jim Johnson

Swing Gang

Al Jones

Stunts

Jimmy Jones

Transportation Coordinator

John Keefer

Grip

Tom Keefer

Dolly Grip

Avi Kipper

Music Mixer; Music Recording

Ron Kuhns

Production Assistant

John Lasalandra

Music Editor

Roger Lattin

Electrician

Al Lee

Stunts

Fred Lewis

Swing Gang

David Linn

Music Coordinator

Bill Loger

Set Costumer

David B Long

Construction Foreman

James Lott

Bestboy Electrician

David Mack

Costumer Assistant

Damon Marcellino

Electrician

Godfrey Marks

Sound Editor

Ned Martin

2nd Assistant Camera

Ray Massara

Special Effects Assistant

Nini Mazen

Post-Production Coordinator

Kim John Mcdonald

Carpenter

Steven C. Mcgee

Bestboy Electrician

Jimmy Medearis

Stunts

Faith Minton

Stunts

Frank Montano

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Thomas Moore

Location Assistant

Bruce Alan Murphy

Cable Operator

Carol Neilson

Stunts

Lesa Nielsen

Prosthetics

Lesa Nielsen

Key Makeup

Eric Norris

Stunts

Michael Norris

Stunts

Shaun O'neal

Special Effects Assistant

Richard Oliphant

Other

Kim Ornitz

Sound Recording Mixer

Brad Orrison

Stunts

Denise Osso

Lyrics ("Two Can Be One")

T-bone Pascuzzo

Sound Recording Mixer

Kevin Piatt

Production Assistant

Larry Pitman

Sound Transfers

Joe Pizzulo

Song Performer ("Two Can Be One")

Rick Prieto

Choreography (Fights)

Victor Quintero

Stunts

Stephanie Reach

Song Performer ("Two Can Be One")

Jeffrey S Renfro

Transportation Captain

Joel Renfro

Transportation Coordinator

Michael Riba

1st Assistant Camera

Emily Rice

Production Auditor

Lauren Roman

Other

Chris Santini

Carpenter

Michael Sarley

Illustrator

Steve Schacter

Dialogue Coach

Kyle Seidenbaum

Title Design

Dennis Shryack

Screenwriter

Kathy Siegel

Sound Editor 2nd Assistant

Gary Simon

Apprentice Editor

William Charles Skeen

Stunts

Susanne Spain

Sound Editor Apprentice

Michelle Stringini

Other

Kate Sullivan

Set Decorator

Frank Swain

Gaffer

Patrick Swain

Electrician

Beatrice Tannen

Thanks

Ken Tarallo

Special Effects Assistant

Philip Thomas

Other

Mary Thompson

Thanks

Bill Van Daalen

Sound Editor

Eric Van Haren Noman

Director Of Photography

Steve Vandeman

Stunts

Dino Vindeni

Other

Anne-marie Vitello

Negative Cutter

Ronald Vitello

Negative Cutter

Christian Adam Wagner

Editor

Cort Wagner

Production Assistant

Raymond Wagner

Producer

Gary Wattman

Dolly Grip

Kat Werner

Transportation Secretary

Oliver Whipple

Grip

Randall Widner

Stunts

Mary Ellen Winston

Costume Designer

Robert Wishnefsky

Craft Services

Neil Wolfson

Swing Gang

Rony Yacov

Executive Head Of Production

Wendy Yorkshire

2nd Assistant Director

Amy Zagorski-wagner

Assistant (To Raymond Wagner)

John Zane

Associate Producer

John Zane

Production Manager

Caroline Zelder

Casting

Jim Zenk

Stills

Kenneth Zimmerman

Carpenter

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Arrangement; Bruce Alan Murphy; Completion Bond Company Inc; Keylite Production Services, Inc.; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Viacom
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)


Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66.

O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate.

After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight.

O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979).

His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal.

by Michael T. Toole
Ron O'neal  (1937-2003) - Ron O'neal (1937-2003)

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)

Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66. O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate. After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight. O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979). His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video February 22, 1989

Released in United States Summer August 26, 1988

Began shooting November 2, 1987.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States on Video February 22, 1989

Released in United States Summer August 26, 1988