McQ


1h 56m 1974
McQ

Brief Synopsis

A police lieutenant tackles corruption when his best friend is killed.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Release Date
1974
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

A Seattle policeman tries to settle an unjust score.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Release Date
1974
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

McQ -


In a career that spanned over 45 years, John Wayne played sheriffs, marshals, Texas Rangers, soldiers, military officers, outlaws with a sense of justice, even a federal agent, but he never played an actual cop until McQ (1974). He had been offered Dirty Harry in 1970 but turned it down for a slate of westerns, a decision he regretted when he saw the film, which became a huge hit as directed by Don Siegel with Clint Eastwood in the title role. So when the screenplay of McQ came his way, he had his production company Batjac take on the maverick cop drama for himself with his son Michael as executive producer.

Lt. Lon McHugh, aka McQ, is a veteran cop in the Seattle Police Department. He's divorced, lives on a boat, and drives a flashy 1973 Pontiac Trans Am nicknamed "the Green Hornet." The boat was Wayne's own craft, "Wild Goose," and the actor bunked there during production, but the car looks more like something Steve McQueen would drive and the big, bulky, aging Wayne seemed to have difficulty climbing in and out of the tiny cab.

The film opens with the systematic murder of three policeman and Wayne makes his entrance by ducking an attempt on his life and coolly shooting the hitman as he runs off. When McQ discovers that his partner and best friend is one of the victims, he beats up the local crime kingpin (Al Lettieri) and then quits the force after his commander (Eddie Albert) disciplines him with desk duty. This one is personal for McQ and he goes rogue with the help of a private eye buddy (David Huddleston), information from a reluctant informant (Roger E. Mosley), and a MAC-10 submachine gun he "borrows" from a local gun dealer (a new piece of weapons technology, the gun received its own "special weapon" credit). This was clearly a cop film made in the wake of Bullitt (1968), The French Connection (1971), and Magnum Force (1973), with roaring car chases through city streets, alleys, packed freeways, and hills almost as steep as San Francisco, a police force riddled with corruption, and a culture where loyalty and trust is in short supply.

Eddie Albert co-stars as McQ's superior officer, whose immediate reaction to a spate of cop killings is to round up the militants and "freaks"--this was 1973, after all--and Diana Muldaur is the widow of McQ's partner. A dignified Julie Adams made the most of a single scene as McQ's ex-wife. "We rehearsed several times, and I felt we caught the undercurrent--two people who were both being polite, but who were in an awkward situation, conscious of all that they had felt for each other," recalled the actress to Wayne biographer Scott Eyman, who noted the parallels to Wayne's real life. Wayne's own marriage was undergoing strains and he separated from his wife, Pilar, shortly after returning home from the location shoot. Colleen Dewhurst is even more memorable in a touching turn as an aging, lonely cocktail waitress and informant with a drug habit and a crush on McQ. There's a melancholy beauty to her performance and Wayne matches her with a tenderness rarely seen in his roles. Clu Gulager, David Huddleston, Al Lettieri, and Roger E. Mosely fill out the supporting cast.

Not only was it Wayne's first urban cop role, it was his first collaboration with director John Sturges, a filmmaker who earned his stripes on such westerns as Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), made his reputation with The Magnificent Seven (1960), and directed such big, brawny action films like The Great Escape (1963) and Ice Station Zebra (1968). Given their propensity for muscular genres and their similar ages--Sturges was just two years younger than Duke--it was surprising they had never worked together before.

The film was shot on location in Seattle and on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State in the summer of 1973. The climactic chase and shoot-out was filmed at Ocean Shores on the Quinault Indian reservation. As Sturges remembers it, "When I got up there on the Olympic Peninsula, I looked at the beach and noticed a guy driving up it. 'Jeez,' I thought, 'that would be a terrific place to stage a chase..." The car chases and stunt driving scenes were designed and overseen by legendary stuntman and future director Hal Needham, who created a driving stunt never before attempted in a film. Previously, ramps were used to send cars flipping over. Needham used a "cannon" with a black powder charge which was placed in the car behind the driver's seat and fired downward to send the car into the air. While testing the stunt, Needham used too much powder and sent the car flying 25 feet straight up. He broke his back and punctured a lung in the impact. Gary McLarty, another stunt driver, was called in to perform the stunt for the cameras in place of the hospitalized Needham. It was a success and the car was sent flipping six times before coming to rest. The driver survived without injury.

After a sneak preview in Seattle in early 1974, Wayne took the film to Cambridge to meet a tongue-in-cheek dare by the staff of the Harvard Lampoon to "have it out, head-on, with the young whelps here who would call the supposedly unbeatable John Wayne the biggest fraud in history." He followed the preview screening with an impromptu press conference, where he matched the irreverent questions of the students with witty responses, matching them quip for quip with a sense of humor none of them expected from the reactionary icon of old Hollywood. "I had the best damn day of my life," he told his secretary and companion Pat Stacy, and the Lampoon sent him their Brass Balls sculpture in tribute.

If Wayne was a hit with the college crowd, the film did little better than break even. At 66 he was a little old for the role of a maverick cop. He suffered from gout, which limited his mobility, and a life making rugged movies and smoking and drinking to excess was taking its toll on his body. After another attempt at a tough urban cop drama, Brannigan (1975), Wayne returned to the genre in which he was most comfortable--the western--and made his final films back in the saddle.

By Sean Axmaker

Sources:
John Wayne: The Life and Legend, Scott Eyman. Simon and Schuster, 2014.
Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges, Glenn Lovell. University of Wisconsin Press, 2008.
John Wayne: American, Randy Roberts and James S. Olson. Free Press, 1995.
"Wayne, Off the Range, Stars as a Policeman in Warners' McQ," Nora Sayre. The New York Times, February 7, 1974.
AFI Catalog of Feature Films
IMDb
Mcq -

McQ -

In a career that spanned over 45 years, John Wayne played sheriffs, marshals, Texas Rangers, soldiers, military officers, outlaws with a sense of justice, even a federal agent, but he never played an actual cop until McQ (1974). He had been offered Dirty Harry in 1970 but turned it down for a slate of westerns, a decision he regretted when he saw the film, which became a huge hit as directed by Don Siegel with Clint Eastwood in the title role. So when the screenplay of McQ came his way, he had his production company Batjac take on the maverick cop drama for himself with his son Michael as executive producer. Lt. Lon McHugh, aka McQ, is a veteran cop in the Seattle Police Department. He's divorced, lives on a boat, and drives a flashy 1973 Pontiac Trans Am nicknamed "the Green Hornet." The boat was Wayne's own craft, "Wild Goose," and the actor bunked there during production, but the car looks more like something Steve McQueen would drive and the big, bulky, aging Wayne seemed to have difficulty climbing in and out of the tiny cab. The film opens with the systematic murder of three policeman and Wayne makes his entrance by ducking an attempt on his life and coolly shooting the hitman as he runs off. When McQ discovers that his partner and best friend is one of the victims, he beats up the local crime kingpin (Al Lettieri) and then quits the force after his commander (Eddie Albert) disciplines him with desk duty. This one is personal for McQ and he goes rogue with the help of a private eye buddy (David Huddleston), information from a reluctant informant (Roger E. Mosley), and a MAC-10 submachine gun he "borrows" from a local gun dealer (a new piece of weapons technology, the gun received its own "special weapon" credit). This was clearly a cop film made in the wake of Bullitt (1968), The French Connection (1971), and Magnum Force (1973), with roaring car chases through city streets, alleys, packed freeways, and hills almost as steep as San Francisco, a police force riddled with corruption, and a culture where loyalty and trust is in short supply. Eddie Albert co-stars as McQ's superior officer, whose immediate reaction to a spate of cop killings is to round up the militants and "freaks"--this was 1973, after all--and Diana Muldaur is the widow of McQ's partner. A dignified Julie Adams made the most of a single scene as McQ's ex-wife. "We rehearsed several times, and I felt we caught the undercurrent--two people who were both being polite, but who were in an awkward situation, conscious of all that they had felt for each other," recalled the actress to Wayne biographer Scott Eyman, who noted the parallels to Wayne's real life. Wayne's own marriage was undergoing strains and he separated from his wife, Pilar, shortly after returning home from the location shoot. Colleen Dewhurst is even more memorable in a touching turn as an aging, lonely cocktail waitress and informant with a drug habit and a crush on McQ. There's a melancholy beauty to her performance and Wayne matches her with a tenderness rarely seen in his roles. Clu Gulager, David Huddleston, Al Lettieri, and Roger E. Mosely fill out the supporting cast. Not only was it Wayne's first urban cop role, it was his first collaboration with director John Sturges, a filmmaker who earned his stripes on such westerns as Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), made his reputation with The Magnificent Seven (1960), and directed such big, brawny action films like The Great Escape (1963) and Ice Station Zebra (1968). Given their propensity for muscular genres and their similar ages--Sturges was just two years younger than Duke--it was surprising they had never worked together before. The film was shot on location in Seattle and on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State in the summer of 1973. The climactic chase and shoot-out was filmed at Ocean Shores on the Quinault Indian reservation. As Sturges remembers it, "When I got up there on the Olympic Peninsula, I looked at the beach and noticed a guy driving up it. 'Jeez,' I thought, 'that would be a terrific place to stage a chase..." The car chases and stunt driving scenes were designed and overseen by legendary stuntman and future director Hal Needham, who created a driving stunt never before attempted in a film. Previously, ramps were used to send cars flipping over. Needham used a "cannon" with a black powder charge which was placed in the car behind the driver's seat and fired downward to send the car into the air. While testing the stunt, Needham used too much powder and sent the car flying 25 feet straight up. He broke his back and punctured a lung in the impact. Gary McLarty, another stunt driver, was called in to perform the stunt for the cameras in place of the hospitalized Needham. It was a success and the car was sent flipping six times before coming to rest. The driver survived without injury. After a sneak preview in Seattle in early 1974, Wayne took the film to Cambridge to meet a tongue-in-cheek dare by the staff of the Harvard Lampoon to "have it out, head-on, with the young whelps here who would call the supposedly unbeatable John Wayne the biggest fraud in history." He followed the preview screening with an impromptu press conference, where he matched the irreverent questions of the students with witty responses, matching them quip for quip with a sense of humor none of them expected from the reactionary icon of old Hollywood. "I had the best damn day of my life," he told his secretary and companion Pat Stacy, and the Lampoon sent him their Brass Balls sculpture in tribute. If Wayne was a hit with the college crowd, the film did little better than break even. At 66 he was a little old for the role of a maverick cop. He suffered from gout, which limited his mobility, and a life making rugged movies and smoking and drinking to excess was taking its toll on his body. After another attempt at a tough urban cop drama, Brannigan (1975), Wayne returned to the genre in which he was most comfortable--the western--and made his final films back in the saddle. By Sean Axmaker Sources: John Wayne: The Life and Legend, Scott Eyman. Simon and Schuster, 2014. Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges, Glenn Lovell. University of Wisconsin Press, 2008. John Wayne: American, Randy Roberts and James S. Olson. Free Press, 1995. "Wayne, Off the Range, Stars as a Policeman in Warners' McQ," Nora Sayre. The New York Times, February 7, 1974. AFI Catalog of Feature Films IMDb

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)


Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99.

The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941).

His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956).

As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace.

After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78).

The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99. The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956). As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace. After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78). The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection


The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection - featuring five classic films from the larger-than-life American hero - will debut on DVD May 3 from Warner Home Video. All five titles in the Collection, including Blood Alley, McQ, The Sea Chase, Tall in the Saddle and The Train Robbers, will be available on DVD for the first time.

Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, John Wayne first worked in the film business as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from U.S.C., which he attended on a football scholarship. He met and was befriended by John Ford, a young director who was beginning to make a name for himself in action films, comedies and dramas. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western The Big Trail, and, although it was a box office failure, the movie showed Wayne's potential.

For the next nine years, Wayne worked in a multitude of B-Westerns and serials in between bit parts in larger features. Wayne's big break came in 1939, when Ford cast him as the Ringo Kid in the adventure Stagecoach. Wayne nearly stole the picture from his more seasoned co-stars, and his career as a box-office superstar began. During his 50 year film career, Wayne played the lead in 142 movies, an as yet unsurpassed record, and was nominated for three Academy Awards®, winning the Best Actor award in 1970 for his performance in True Grit.

Details of The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection Films

Blood Alley (1955) - An American seafarer patrolling the South Seas is asked by the daughter of a missionary doctor killed by the Communists to help transport the citizens of a small Chinese town to freedom in Hong Kong. This action-adventure based on A. S. Fleischman's novel, marks the first on-screen pairing of movie legends John Wayne and Lauren Bacall.

DVD special features include:

Newsreel footage
- The Hollywood Foreign Press Honors John Wayne
- Crusade for Freedom
- John Wayne and The Legion Poppy Sale (silent clip)
- Air Force Honors the Cast of Blood Alley
-1955 Promos on Blood Alley - Wayne discusses how he made it into the movies; "the monster" of movie land; the Mitchell BNC camera and his use of his home movie camera to capture scenes while on Blood Alley
- John Wayne trailer gallery

McQ (1974) - John Wayne forcefully enforces the law in this high-velocity thriller that's a revenge western set in the big city. Police Lieutenant Lon McQ (Wayne) investigates the killing of his best friend and uncovers corrupt elements of the police department dealing in confiscated drugs. Directed by John Sturges (Ice Station Zebra, The Magnificent Seven), McQ also stars Eddie Albert (Roman Holiday) and Colleen Dewhurst (Annie Hall, Dying Young).

DVD special features include:

- Featurette
- John Wayne trailer gallery

The Sea Chase (1955) - John Wayne and Lana Turner are a formidable romantic team in this harrowing adventure directed by Academy Award-nominee John Farrow (Wake Island). Sea captain Kal Erhlich (Wayne) is an anti-Nazi German freighter captain at the outset of World War II attempting to sail his ship from Australia to the North Sea rather than risk internment. Both Allied and German ships follow in pursuit, while Erhlich battles storms, sharks, and romances.

DVD special features include:

- John Wayne trailer gallery

Tall in the Saddle (1944) - In this fast-paced entertaining western, John Wayne stars as Rocklin, a cowboy who upon arriving at a ranch to work as a cowhand finds his employer was just murdered. Although he has no friends, and no money, Rocklin stays in town, intent on tracking the killers and uncovering a plan to inherit the dead employer's riches.

DVD special features include:

- John Wayne trailer gallery

The Train Robbers (1973) - The action never stops in this western starring John Wayne, Ann-Margret and Ricardo Montalban. A gunhand named Lane (Wayne) is hired by a widow, Mrs. Lowe (Ann-Margret), to find gold stolen by her husband so that she may return it and start fresh. However, once they cross the border into Mexico to recover the loot, they discover two very different pursuers: a large group of bandidos and a lone horseman (Montalban), both of whom know their every move.

DVD special features include:

Two featurettes
Working with a Western Legend - an inside look at Wayne with stuntmen Jerry Gatlin, Dean Smith and Terry Leonard
The Wayne Train
- John Wayne trailer gallery

John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection

The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection - featuring five classic films from the larger-than-life American hero - will debut on DVD May 3 from Warner Home Video. All five titles in the Collection, including Blood Alley, McQ, The Sea Chase, Tall in the Saddle and The Train Robbers, will be available on DVD for the first time. Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, John Wayne first worked in the film business as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from U.S.C., which he attended on a football scholarship. He met and was befriended by John Ford, a young director who was beginning to make a name for himself in action films, comedies and dramas. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western The Big Trail, and, although it was a box office failure, the movie showed Wayne's potential. For the next nine years, Wayne worked in a multitude of B-Westerns and serials in between bit parts in larger features. Wayne's big break came in 1939, when Ford cast him as the Ringo Kid in the adventure Stagecoach. Wayne nearly stole the picture from his more seasoned co-stars, and his career as a box-office superstar began. During his 50 year film career, Wayne played the lead in 142 movies, an as yet unsurpassed record, and was nominated for three Academy Awards®, winning the Best Actor award in 1970 for his performance in True Grit. Details of The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection Films Blood Alley (1955) - An American seafarer patrolling the South Seas is asked by the daughter of a missionary doctor killed by the Communists to help transport the citizens of a small Chinese town to freedom in Hong Kong. This action-adventure based on A. S. Fleischman's novel, marks the first on-screen pairing of movie legends John Wayne and Lauren Bacall. DVD special features include: Newsreel footage - The Hollywood Foreign Press Honors John Wayne - Crusade for Freedom - John Wayne and The Legion Poppy Sale (silent clip) - Air Force Honors the Cast of Blood Alley -1955 Promos on Blood Alley - Wayne discusses how he made it into the movies; "the monster" of movie land; the Mitchell BNC camera and his use of his home movie camera to capture scenes while on Blood Alley - John Wayne trailer gallery McQ (1974) - John Wayne forcefully enforces the law in this high-velocity thriller that's a revenge western set in the big city. Police Lieutenant Lon McQ (Wayne) investigates the killing of his best friend and uncovers corrupt elements of the police department dealing in confiscated drugs. Directed by John Sturges (Ice Station Zebra, The Magnificent Seven), McQ also stars Eddie Albert (Roman Holiday) and Colleen Dewhurst (Annie Hall, Dying Young). DVD special features include: - Featurette - John Wayne trailer gallery The Sea Chase (1955) - John Wayne and Lana Turner are a formidable romantic team in this harrowing adventure directed by Academy Award-nominee John Farrow (Wake Island). Sea captain Kal Erhlich (Wayne) is an anti-Nazi German freighter captain at the outset of World War II attempting to sail his ship from Australia to the North Sea rather than risk internment. Both Allied and German ships follow in pursuit, while Erhlich battles storms, sharks, and romances. DVD special features include: - John Wayne trailer gallery Tall in the Saddle (1944) - In this fast-paced entertaining western, John Wayne stars as Rocklin, a cowboy who upon arriving at a ranch to work as a cowhand finds his employer was just murdered. Although he has no friends, and no money, Rocklin stays in town, intent on tracking the killers and uncovering a plan to inherit the dead employer's riches. DVD special features include: - John Wayne trailer gallery The Train Robbers (1973) - The action never stops in this western starring John Wayne, Ann-Margret and Ricardo Montalban. A gunhand named Lane (Wayne) is hired by a widow, Mrs. Lowe (Ann-Margret), to find gold stolen by her husband so that she may return it and start fresh. However, once they cross the border into Mexico to recover the loot, they discover two very different pursuers: a large group of bandidos and a lone horseman (Montalban), both of whom know their every move. DVD special features include: Two featurettes Working with a Western Legend - an inside look at Wayne with stuntmen Jerry Gatlin, Dean Smith and Terry Leonard The Wayne Train - John Wayne trailer gallery

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1974

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States 1974