The Naughty Flirt


57m 1931
The Naughty Flirt

Brief Synopsis

A flighty heiress goes to work as a secretary to win the straitlaced man she loves.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Jan 11, 1931
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
57m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

A wild party given by weathy young Kay Elliott ends up in night court and Jack Gregory, a member of the party, pleads with Kay to marry him that night in the courtroom. Alan Ward, a young lawyer, is present when they arrive at court. Alan, who works for Kay's father, is disgusted by her frivolous behavior and lectures her so severely, she decides to marry Jack out of spite. Alan telephones Kay's father John, who demands that he bring her home at once. Kay is stimulated by Alan's seeming disinterest in her. She invites him to several events, but he refuses to attend any of them. Finally, she fools him into thinking he is invited to a birthday party for her father. Annoyed by the trick, Alan ignores her for the rest of the evening. When she finally gets him alone, Kay tells Alan that because everyone wants to marry her for her money, she toys with them, but adds that she sincerely likes him. He likes Kay too, but when he overhears one of the men say that she bet him she would have Alan eating out of her hand by midnight, he thinks she is trying to make a fool out of him and spanks her like a bad child. The spanking makes her determined to prove that she is worth something by taking a job as a secretary in her father's law firm. When Alan accuses her of failing at the job, she quits in anger. Alan apologizes, explaining that he loves her and they announce their engagement at a party. Linda, Jack's sister, plots to break up their engagement so that Jack can step in and marry Kay for her money. Linda makes it seem as if Alan was in her room that evening, and Kay believes the worst. Alan is so hurt by this that he resigns from the law firm. Then Kay learns that Alan was framed and plans a way to get back at Jack. She agrees to marry him, making sure that Alan knows what she is doing. Alan rushes after her to prevent the marriage, but at the last minute, Kay refuses to marry Jack and announces that she wants to marry Alan.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Jan 11, 1931
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
57m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

The Naughty Flirt


"Cocktails, Youth, and Dancing" was the headline of The New York Times ' review of The Naughty Flirt (1931). It sounds like a winning combo, but the picture failed to make much of an impression. The reviewer, Mordaunt Hall, wrote of the film: "It is as difficult to find something to praise as it is to find a needle in a haystack." Ouch. Variety echoed The Times, declaring: "Title hardly suggests the story which...can be reduced to a dumb number falling for a guy that's hard to get and getting him...Four starting points and even more endings."

The story casts Alice White as an heiress whose beau (Paul Page) has had enough of her spoiled ways. "Go jump in the lake," she tells him. Sensing an opportunity, a brother-sister team (Douglas Gilmore and Myrna Loy) who have lost their wealth in the stock market crash, move in on White, their plan being for Gilmore to romance and wed her for her money.

It's true there's not much there, and indeed the movie is only 57 minutes long, but it does offer a chance to see 26-year-old Myrna Loy in an early role. This was her last film under her contract to Warner Brothers, which generally wasted her talents while she was at the studio. Afterwards she did a notable Sam Goldwyn picture, Arrowsmith (1931), and signed with Fox for a year. After Irving Thalberg noticed her, an MGM contract followed and her career skyrocketed.

Alice White, on the other hand, was on her way down. She had recently been touted as Warner Brothers' answer to Clara Bow, but her time in the Hollywood spotlight was very brief. She was a secretary before entering the business as Josef von Sternberg's script girl, turning to acting in 1927. She rose to stardom just as talkies took over, but by the mid-1930s she was back to supporting roles. A dozen years later, after retiring from the screen, she was back to being a secretary.

Look for Marian Marsh, one of the loveliest actresses in Hollywood at the time, in her last uncredited role. Four months later she would star opposite John Barrymore in Svengali (1931), the real beginning of a successful career.

Director: Edward F. Cline
Screenplay: Richard Weil, Earl Baldwin, Frederick A. Bowen (story)
Cinematography: Sidney Hickox
Film Editing: Jack Rawlins
Art Direction: John Hughes
Music: Sam H. Stept
Cast: Alice White (Kay Elliott), Paul Page (Alan Joseph Ward), Myrna Loy (Linda Gregory), Robert Agnew (Wilbur Fairchild), Douglas Gilmore (Jack Gregory), George Irving (John Raleigh Elliott).
BW-56m.

by Jeremy Arnold
The Naughty Flirt

The Naughty Flirt

"Cocktails, Youth, and Dancing" was the headline of The New York Times ' review of The Naughty Flirt (1931). It sounds like a winning combo, but the picture failed to make much of an impression. The reviewer, Mordaunt Hall, wrote of the film: "It is as difficult to find something to praise as it is to find a needle in a haystack." Ouch. Variety echoed The Times, declaring: "Title hardly suggests the story which...can be reduced to a dumb number falling for a guy that's hard to get and getting him...Four starting points and even more endings." The story casts Alice White as an heiress whose beau (Paul Page) has had enough of her spoiled ways. "Go jump in the lake," she tells him. Sensing an opportunity, a brother-sister team (Douglas Gilmore and Myrna Loy) who have lost their wealth in the stock market crash, move in on White, their plan being for Gilmore to romance and wed her for her money. It's true there's not much there, and indeed the movie is only 57 minutes long, but it does offer a chance to see 26-year-old Myrna Loy in an early role. This was her last film under her contract to Warner Brothers, which generally wasted her talents while she was at the studio. Afterwards she did a notable Sam Goldwyn picture, Arrowsmith (1931), and signed with Fox for a year. After Irving Thalberg noticed her, an MGM contract followed and her career skyrocketed. Alice White, on the other hand, was on her way down. She had recently been touted as Warner Brothers' answer to Clara Bow, but her time in the Hollywood spotlight was very brief. She was a secretary before entering the business as Josef von Sternberg's script girl, turning to acting in 1927. She rose to stardom just as talkies took over, but by the mid-1930s she was back to supporting roles. A dozen years later, after retiring from the screen, she was back to being a secretary. Look for Marian Marsh, one of the loveliest actresses in Hollywood at the time, in her last uncredited role. Four months later she would star opposite John Barrymore in Svengali (1931), the real beginning of a successful career. Director: Edward F. Cline Screenplay: Richard Weil, Earl Baldwin, Frederick A. Bowen (story) Cinematography: Sidney Hickox Film Editing: Jack Rawlins Art Direction: John Hughes Music: Sam H. Stept Cast: Alice White (Kay Elliott), Paul Page (Alan Joseph Ward), Myrna Loy (Linda Gregory), Robert Agnew (Wilbur Fairchild), Douglas Gilmore (Jack Gregory), George Irving (John Raleigh Elliott). BW-56m. by Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Frederick A. Bowen's original story was entitled "Man Crazy."