The Island


1h 54m 1980

Brief Synopsis

In a Caribbean colony that has existed for hundreds of years, ruthless pirates make their living by raiding pleasure ships. When reporter Blair Maynard goes to investigate the story about disappearing boats, he and his son Justin are captured, but the pirates spare their lives. Instead of killing th

Film Details

Also Known As
Island
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Universal Clearances; Universal Pictures
Distribution Company
Cic Productions
Location
Dade County, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

In a Caribbean colony that has existed for hundreds of years, ruthless pirates make their living by raiding pleasure ships. When reporter Blair Maynard goes to investigate the story about disappearing boats, he and his son Justin are captured, but the pirates spare their lives. Instead of killing them, the pirates decide to make them part of their community, Blair is to write for the illiterate group and father children to offset inbreeding, and Justin is to be brainwashed and groomed to become the heir to their leader. .

Crew

Carolyn Abe

Assistant Editor

Phil Adams

Stunts

Bernard Bats

Sound Recording

Richard Beggs

Sound Rerecording

Peter Benchley

Source Material (From Novel)

Peter Benchley

Screenwriter

Mark Berger

Sound Rerecording

Jay Boekelheide

Sound Editor

David Brown

Producer

Fletcher Bryant

Stunts

Tom Bullock

Sound Editor Supervisor

Chris Carreras

2nd Assistant Director

Jimmy Casino

Stunts

Dave Cass

Stunts

David S Cass

Stunts

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Gary Chasen

Production Assistant

Michel Cheyko

1st Assistant Director

Erik Cord

Stunts

Bill Couch

Stunts

Robert De Vestel

Set Decorator

Vince Deadrick

Stunts

Henri Decae

Director Of Photography

Chris Doyle

Stunts

Susan Dukow

Other

Al Ebner

Publicist

Dean Engelhardt

Stunts

Eugene Finley

Sound Editor Supervisor

George Fisher

Stunts

Vivien Hillgrove Gilliam

Sound Editor

Ted Grossman

Stunt Coordinator

Richard A Harris

Editor

Orwin Harvey

Stunts

Dale Hennesy

Production Designer

Bob Herron

Stunts

Robert Herron

Stunts

Larry Holt

Stunts

John Hudkins

Stunts

Walter Huse

Key Grip

John M Johnson

Stunts

Hubie Kerns Jr.

Stunts

Rick Kline

Sound Rerecording

Bobbe P Kurtz

Sound Editor

Clay Lacy

Stunts

Fred M. Lerner

Stunts

Alan Levine

Unit Production Manager

Dennis Madalone

Stunts

William James Madden

Stunts

Jack Marino

Props

Jack M Marino

Props

Donald O Mitchell

Sound Rerecording

Robert M Moore

Costume Supervisor

Ennio Morricone

Music; Music Director

William M Nicholson

Sound Rerecording

Paquita Nunez

Hairstyles

John Nutt

Sound Editor

Grant Page

Stunts

David Parker

Sound Recording

Victor Paul

Stunts

Ray Pratte

Technical Advisor (Coast Guard)

Neil Roach

Sea Photography

Ernest Robinson

Stunts

George Robotham

Stunts

John Robotham

Stunts

Yves Rodallec

Camera Operator

Philip Romano

Stunts

Thomas Rosales Jr.

Stunts

Ann Roth

Costume Designer

Jose Antonio Sanchez

Makeup

Silvio Scarano

Costume Supervisor

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

Swede Sorenson

Sound Recording

Paul Stader

Stunts

Richard Strauss

Other

Brian Stuart-young

Production Assistant

Bill Taylor

Matte Photography

Michael Tronick

Music Editor

Dianne Wager

Art Direction Assistant

Peter Waller

2nd Assistant Director

Bud Walls

Stunts

Cliff Wenger

Special Effects

Bob Westmoreland

Makeup

Albert Whitlock

Special Visual Effects

Jerry Wills

Stunts

Richard D. Zanuck

Producer

Manfred Zendar

Technical Advisor

Film Details

Also Known As
Island
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Universal Clearances; Universal Pictures
Distribution Company
Cic Productions
Location
Dade County, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1980

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1980