Honeymoon In Vegas


1h 35m 1992

Brief Synopsis

A New York detective/mama's boy loses his fiancee to a rich con man in Las Vegas.

Film Details

Also Known As
Smekmånad i Las Vegas
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Kauai, Hawaii, USA; Culver Studios, Culver City, California, USA; Bally's Casino Resort, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

A New York detective/mama's boy loses his fiancee to a rich con man in Las Vegas.

Crew

Andy Aaron

Sound Effects

J K Ae'a

Song

Peter Afterman

Music Supervisor

A Angels

Song

Linda Antipala

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Mae Boren Axton

Song

Mark Baird

Production

Rick Barker

Stunt Coordinator

Rick Barker

Stunts

Kirk Bastian

Other

Bernie Baum

Song

Jeff Beck

Song Performer

Barry Bedig

Property Master

Bob Beemer

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Yudi Bennett

Assistant Director

Andrew Bergman

Screenplay

Louis Bertini

Assistant Sound Editor

Elisha Birnbaum

Foley Artist

Otis Blackwell

Song

Gerald H Boatright

Gaffer

Howard Bohl

Pilot

Franco Bonisolli

Song Performer

David Boulton

Adr

Bradley J Bovee

Stunts

Bill Boyd

Foreman

Tim Boyle

Music

Jim Bozarth

Other

Brad Brophy

Other

Michael Brophy

Other

Kris Bulakowski

Adr Editor

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Jerry Byrd

Song Performer

Sabrina Calley

Production Assistant

Tom Cannarozzo

Other

Frank Cappiello

Other

David Carbonara

Music

Bert Carroll

Music Composer

Ann Chatterton

Stunts

Kristina Clark

Production Assistant

James Claytor

Assistant Art Director

Stan Cockerell

Props Assistant

Marc Cohen

Assistant Editor

Danny Costa

Stunts

Ray Cottingham

Photography

Ray Cottingham

Other

John Cressey

Pilot

Arthur Crudup

Music Composer

Arthur Crudup

Song

Gregg Dandridge

Stunts

Kathi Danielson

Production Accountant

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Gary Deaton

Construction Coordinator

E Decurtis

Music Composer

G B Decurtis

Music Composer

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

David Diano

Camera Operator

Thomas Drescher

Music Editor

Tommy Durden

Song

William A Elliott

Production Designer

Suzy Elmiger

Assistant Editor

Lampton Enochs

Location Manager

Bruce Ericksen

Costume Supervisor

Peter Evangelatos

Craft Service

Cindy Evans

Assistant

Skip Evans

Pilot

Mike Fenton

Casting

Bryan Ferry

Song Performer

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Jim Fonnesback

Other

Roger Foster

Other

William Fraker

Dp/Cinematographer

William Fraker

Director Of Photography

Gerald Gadette

Other

John Ganem

Assistant Editor

Carlos Garcia

Caterer

Yvonne Garnier-hackl

Art Department Coordinator

Bill Giant

Song

Clearance Giddons

Song Performer

Vince Gill

Song Performer

Mark W Gillespie

Other

Nancy Gilmore

On-Set Dresser

Wally Gold

Music Composer

Allison Gordon-kohler

Casting

Amy Grant

Song Performer

Lynda Gurasich

Hair Stylist

Ron Hahn-morin

Production Assistant

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Lou Handman

Song

Don Hardenburg

Props

Jack Hardwicke

Assistant Production Accountant

George Head

Other

Beth Evin Heffner

Other

Pat Hemenway

Other

Bruce Hernandez

Song Performer

Thomas B Hoeck

Other

Nancy Hopton

Script Supervisor

H Hougassian

Song

Chris Howell

Stunts

Lawrence Hubbs

Set Designer

Eric Hughes

Assistant

Michael C Hurren

Other

Michele Imperato-stabile

Production Coordinator

Lamont Jackson

Stunts

Kenton Jakub

Adr Editor

Mark James

Song

Billy Joel

Song Performer

Jeff L Johnson

Props

Rob Johnson

Stunts

Robert K Johnson

Transportation Captain

Frank P Kahala

Song

Harry Kalapana

Song Performer

Neil L Kaufman

Dialogue Editor

Jeff Kay

Production Assistant

Florence Kaye

Song

Deborah Kent

Assistant Director

Robert Kim

Song Performer

Michael Kirchberger

Sound Editor

Dan Korintus

Foley Editor

Bob Kurtz

Animator

Gemma Lamana

Photography

George Lara

Foley

Al Laverde

Key Grip

Jerry Leiber

Song

Joshua Levin

Apprentice

Jeff Levine

Assistant

Jed Lieber

Song Performer

Dennis Linde

Song

Anna Lobell

Assistant

Mike Lobell

Producer

Brett Loncar

Assistant

Bernie Lowe

Song

Neil A Machlis

Unit Production Manager

Neil A Machlis

Executive Producer

David Macmillan

Sound Mixer

Kenneth Makuakane

Song

Barry Malkin

Editor

Ruby K Manis

Costumes

Kal Mann

Song

Steve Maslow

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Valorie Massalas

Casting

Vera Matson

Song

Nancy Mcardle

Costume Supervisor

Jane Mcculley

Adr Editor

William T Mckane

Lighting

John Mellencamp

Song Performer

Adam Merims

Associate Producer

Raxford L Metz

Camera Operator

Cheri Minns

Makeup Artist

D Mark Miscevic

Other

Russell Moody

Song

Doug Murray

Sound Dubbing

Dan Muscarella

Color Timer

Willie Nelson

Song Performer

David Newman

Music Arranger

David Newman

Music

Louis Niemeyer

Assistant Camera Operator

Randy Nolen

Steadicam Operator

Thomas J. O'connell

Adr

Bettina O'mara

Other

Bitty O'sullivan-smith

Dialogue Editor

Hui Ohana

Song Performer

Jeff Okabayashi

Assistant Director

Greg Papalia

Assistant Art Director

Stan Parks

Special Effects Coordinator

Stan Parks

Stunts

Mark Parry

Second Unit Director

Hugo Peretti

Music Composer

Enrico Peronelli

Other

Craig Pettigrew

Music Editor

Donn Piller

On-Set Dresser

Doc Pomus

Song

John P Powers

Grip

Elvis Presley

Song

Elvis Presley

Song Performer

Kavin Quibell

Special Effects

Ralph Rainger

Song

John Rankin

On-Set Dresser

Lex Rawlins

Assistant Camera Operator

Joe Ritter

Steadicam Operator

David H Roberts

Other

Leo Robin

Song

Richard Rodgers

Song

Tim Roe

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Rooy

Assistant Director

Thomas Rosales Jr.

Stunts

Debbie Lynn Ross

Stunts

John Sarviss

Helicopter Pilot

Aaron Schroeder

Music Composer

Michael Schultz

Caterer

Kenneth V Searle

Stunts

Kenneth V Searle

Transportation Coordinator

Scott Senechal

Assistant Director

Warren Shaw

Apprentice

Suzanne Sherrill

Assistant

Mort Shuman

Song

Daniel Silverberg

Assistant Director

Monty Simmons

Production Assistant

Kelly Smith

Other

Mychal Smith

Boom Operator

Film Details

Also Known As
Smekmånad i Las Vegas
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Kauai, Hawaii, USA; Culver Studios, Culver City, California, USA; Bally's Casino Resort, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for two Golden Globe (1992) awards, including best picture (musical or comedy) and best actor (Nicholas Cage).

Released in United States on Video February 24, 1993

Released in United States Summer August 28, 1992

Began shooting August 19, 1991.

Completed shooting November 8, 1991.

Released in United States on Video February 24, 1993

Released in United States Summer August 28, 1992