Twilight in the Sierras


1h 7m 1950

Brief Synopsis

Roy is a United States Marshal tracking down a counterfeiting ring and hunting down a mountain lion. Songs: "It's One Wonderful Day," "Rootin' Tootin' Cowboy," "Pancho's Rancho" and the title song.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 22, 1950
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Trucolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,994ft

Synopsis

After retiring from the bench, Judge Wiggins converts his Morongo County ranch into a house for parolees. When Wiggins receives a visit from his friend, state parole officer Roy Rogers, he introduces Roy to Ricardo Chavez, a convicted counterfeiter who has been staying at the ranch. Later, Wiggins and his foreman, Matt Brunner, who is operating a gang under the judge's nose, leave to hunt a mountain lion that has been recently stalking the ranch animals. When Ricardo decides to accompany them, he is kidnapped by Matt's gang, and his dog, "Perro," is shot. After Perro limps back to the ranch alone, Wiggins telephones Sheriff Callahan to report Ricardo's disappearance. Instead of the sheriff, his daughter, Deputy Patricia Callahan, answers and explains that she will be responding to all calls until her father returns from out of town. Later, at the ranch, Pat and Roy find a letter from Ricardo's sister Lola, announcing that she will be coming from Cuba to visit the ranch, which Ricardo has told her he owns. Meanwhile, at their hideout, the gang forces Ricardo to work on some plates for printing counterfeit gold certificates, which are still considered legal tender in some foreign countries. Later, Matt sends henchman Blake to meet Lola at the bus station. When Blake sees her accept a ride from a fellow passenger named Paul Clifford, he follows. Roy also follows and, after chasing Blake away, introduces himself to Lola. Later, Clifford, who has come to town to purchase the plates, meets with Matt and his henchman, Mason, at their hideout, the Morongo Lodge. Since the plates are not yet finished, Clifford agrees to place the money he has brought with him for the transaction into the lodge's safe. Later that afternoon, when Lola does not show up for the lion hunt, Matt's men kidnap her from her cabin. After Roy decides to join the hunting party, Matt surreptitiously disables his gun. During the hunt, the dogs chase the lion up a tree, and one of the hunters, who is a member of Matt's gang, takes advantage of the situation and shoots at Roy. Just then, the lion pounces on the man, knocking him off the edge of a steep cliff. After the gang accuses Roy of killing the outlaw, Pat tries to arrest him. As Roy is escaping, one of the outlaws shoots his horse Trigger in the neck. When Roy realizes that Trigger has been shot, he rides directly to the home of his friend, Dr. Sparrow Biffle, who removes the bullet. After Pat arrests Roy, Sheriff Callahan returns to town to release him to Wiggins' custody. Meanwhile, at the lodge, Matt sees Clifford trying to retrieve his cash and shoots him. Shortly thereafter, Roy and Wiggins fire tear gas capsules through the lodge windows, while Matt tries to escape on a wagon carrying Ricardo. The wagon catches fire, but Ricardo jumps to safety just before it explodes. When the lion tries to attack Matt, he is so frightened that he stumbles backward off the cliff to his death below.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 22, 1950
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Trucolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,994ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The opening credits included the following written disclaimer: "All currency reproductions are by special permission of the Secretary of the Treasury. Further reproduction in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited." Modern sources include Joe Carro and Bob Burns in the cast.