Rocky IV


1h 31m 1985
Rocky IV

Brief Synopsis

The heavyweight champ takes on a Soviet super-boxer in a bout that creates an international furor.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Sports
Sequel
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Synopsis

Rocky is brought out of retirement to go up against an almost superhuman, seemingly undefeatable Soviet boxer who could easily be a one-man killing machine.

Crew

Steve Abrums

Makeup

Laurie Allison

Production Assistant

Eric D Andersen

Camera Operator

Mary Andrews

Adr Editor

Timothy Board

Editor

Tom Bronson

Costume Designer

James Brown

Song Performer

James D. Brubaker

Executive Producer

Marcei A Brubaker

Production Assistant

Susie Brubaker

Production Assistant

Wilmer Butler

Director Of Photography

John Cafferty

Song Performer

Billy Chartoff

Location Manager

Robert Chartoff

Producer

Arthur Chobanian

Executive Producer

Kay Cole

Production Assistant

James R Connell

Camera Operator

John J Connor

Camera Operator

Bill Conti

Theme Music

Peter Cox

Song

Jayne Dancose

Makeup

Vince Dicola

Music Arranger

Vince Dicola

Music Producer

Vince Dicola

Music

Vince Dicola

Song

Steve Dorff

Song

Richard Drummie

Song

Mary Eilts

Production Manager

Leonard Engleman

Makeup

Bob Ennis

Camera Operator

George Erschbamer

Special Effects Coordinator

Joe Esposito

Song

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Ed Fruge

Music Arranger

Ed Fruge

Song

Ed Fruge

Music Producer

Robin Garb

Music Supervisor

Michael A. Genne

Camera Operator

Rick T Gentz

Set Decorator

Gary S. Gerlich

Sound Effects Editor

Richard Giachetti

Technical Advisor

Jack N Green

Camera Operator

Jay M Harding

Sound

Dan Hartman

Song

Duncan Henderson

Assistant Director

Linda Henrikson

Costumes

Duane Hitchings

Song

Jake Hooker

Song

Howard Jensen

Special Effects

Amanda Mackey Johnson

Casting

Bill Kenney

Production Designer

Gladys Knight

Song Performer

Jane Knutsen

Assistant Director

Michael J Kohut

Sound

Murray Lantz

Costumes

Robert Lemer

Location Manager

Philip Linzey

Camera Operator

Kenny Loggins

Song Performer

Michael Long

Costumes

Jeremy Lubbock

Original Music

Fred Lucky

Visual Effects

Terry Mahady

Original Music

Susan Malloy

Wardrobe Supervisor

Victoria Martin

Sound Effects Editor

Jo Ann May-pavey

Production Manager

Charlie Midnight

Song

Paul Murphey

Video

Ray O'reilly

Sound

Rod Parkhurst

Camera Operator

Andrew G Patterson

Adr Editor

Jim Peterik

Song

Michael Mckensie Pratt

Choreographer

Tim Prince

Video

Aaron Rochin

Sound

Chris Ryan

Assistant Director

Rodney Sharpp

Production Assistant

Brenton Spencer

Camera Operator

Sylvester Stallone

Screenplay

Karen A Stewart

Production Coordinator

Chriss Strauss

Production Coordinator

Frankie Sullivan

Song

James R Symons

Editor

Robert Tepper

Song

Robert Tepper

Song Performer

Mark Torien

Song Performer

Frank Warner

Sound Editor

Bill Wells

Production Consultant

Tony Westman

Camera Operator

John W. Wheeler

Editor

Charles Wilborn

Sound

Paul H. Williams

Song

Irwin Winkler

Producer

Marti Wright

Set Decorator

William Wylie

Sound Effects Editor

James D Young

Music Editor

Don Zimmerman

Editor

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Sports
Sequel
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Articles

Rocky IV


By the mid-'80s, Sylvester Stallone's career-making project Rocky (1976) was no longer merely a small-budget effort that walked away with the Best Picture Oscar, but the launching point of a profitable franchise. Audiences returned again and again to see the pug from Philly triumph against impossible odds, even as the formula became more transparent with every sequel. For Rocky Balboa's fourth entry into the ring, writer-director-star Stallone needed to up the stakes with an opponent more formidable than even Mr. T, and he'd settle for no less than a battle between the American Way and that 'evil empire' behind the Berlin Wall as the backdrop for Rocky IV (1985).

The narrative picks up with the Balboa clan living a life of quiet prosperity since Rocky regained his championship belt; onetime nemesis Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers) is now a part of Rocky's inner circle, sparring with the champ to keep him sharp. There are few credible challengers to his title, although one starts to pique the global community's interest. The Soviet Union has been trumpeting an amateur boxer, a sculpted 6'6" brute named Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren), as the end product of the nation's cutting-edge fitness science, and the true champion of the world. While the American boxing community is dismissive, Creed wants the opportunity to make a point, and an exhibition bout in Las Vegas is arranged.

The gaudy spectacle of the match goes horribly wrong. Prepared to wear Drago down by sticking and moving, Apollo is instead brutally pummeled by the impervious giant. The fight is stopped, but Creed dies as a result of the beating. Doing what he has to do, Rocky agrees to an unsanctioned confrontation with Drago in Moscow to be held on Christmas Day. The champ opts to perform his training on enemy soil, working out at a barren Russian farmhouse. His Spartan, low-tech regimen--lifting boulders, dragging sledges, running up the Steppes in lieu of the Art Museum steps--is juxtaposed with Drago's extensively calibrated (and apparently chemically-enhanced) preparations. At zero hour, in front of a capacity crowd of hostile Muscovites, the Italian Stallion is ready to lock up, and let the best man--and ideology--win.

Is the outcome ever really in doubt? Of course not. At a tidy 90 minutes, which included not one but two montages from the prior three films, Rocky IV is patently the work of a director with a story to tell and with only so many different ways to tell it. No matter how savage a pounding Rocky took at the hands of Drago, it was nothing compared to the one that was forthcoming from the critics. "[E]ach succeeding movie has become bigger, emptier, more preposterous. Noisier, too," wrote Sheila Benson of the Los Angeles Times. "Stallone has become a maniacally obvious pop demagogue--a cartoon master so manipulative that the whole audience can join in the joke of how dumb his films are," stated New York's David Denby.

The jingoism might have been all too obvious, and out in the real world, as Rocky IV was being prepped for release, the Geneva Summit between the superpowers had brought U.S./Soviet tensions to their lowest ebb in generations. Still, Stallone showed that while he had savvy at punching his cinematic ring opponents, he was even better at punching the buttons of the mass audience. Rocky IV pulled in big box-office receipts during the 1985 holiday season. "[T]here's only one proper way to experience this," wrote Newsday's Mike McGrady, "and that with a full house of screaming, whistling, applauding fans who aren't inclined to be what you'd call overly critical."

In the well-educated onetime bouncer/bodyguard/kickboxing champion Lundgren, Stallone found a fearsome and wholly credible Goliath for his parable. Over the years since, Lundgren has taken the cachet he gained from the role and parlayed it into a long string of leads in B-level actioners. Cast as Drago's Olympian wife and mouthpiece was Brigitte Nielsen, the six-foot Swedish model who was then the woman of the moment in Stallone's life. "She has heart, humor, beauty, athletic prowess, maternal instincts," Stallone told Rolling Stone from the set in 1985. "And she's classically true to her man--I mean, really dedicated to the maintaining and prolonging of this relationship. There's a permanency about it." For what it's worth, the couple wound up divorcing in 1987.

Producer: James D. Brubaker, Robert Chartoff, Arthur Chobanian, Irwin Winkler
Director: Sylvester Stallone
Screenplay: Sylvester Stallone
Cinematography: Bill Butler
Film Editing: John W. Wheeler, Don Zimmerman
Art Direction: Bill Kenney
Music: Bill Conti, Vince DiCola, John Cafferty, Richard Drummie, Jim Peterik, Frankie Sullivan
Cast: Sylvester Stallone (Rocky Balboa), Talia Shire (Adrian Balboa), Burt Young (Paulie), Carl Weathers (Apollo Creed), Brigitte Nielsen (Ludmilla), Dolph Lundgren (Drago).
C-91m. Letterboxed.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Rocky Iv

Rocky IV

By the mid-'80s, Sylvester Stallone's career-making project Rocky (1976) was no longer merely a small-budget effort that walked away with the Best Picture Oscar, but the launching point of a profitable franchise. Audiences returned again and again to see the pug from Philly triumph against impossible odds, even as the formula became more transparent with every sequel. For Rocky Balboa's fourth entry into the ring, writer-director-star Stallone needed to up the stakes with an opponent more formidable than even Mr. T, and he'd settle for no less than a battle between the American Way and that 'evil empire' behind the Berlin Wall as the backdrop for Rocky IV (1985). The narrative picks up with the Balboa clan living a life of quiet prosperity since Rocky regained his championship belt; onetime nemesis Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers) is now a part of Rocky's inner circle, sparring with the champ to keep him sharp. There are few credible challengers to his title, although one starts to pique the global community's interest. The Soviet Union has been trumpeting an amateur boxer, a sculpted 6'6" brute named Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren), as the end product of the nation's cutting-edge fitness science, and the true champion of the world. While the American boxing community is dismissive, Creed wants the opportunity to make a point, and an exhibition bout in Las Vegas is arranged. The gaudy spectacle of the match goes horribly wrong. Prepared to wear Drago down by sticking and moving, Apollo is instead brutally pummeled by the impervious giant. The fight is stopped, but Creed dies as a result of the beating. Doing what he has to do, Rocky agrees to an unsanctioned confrontation with Drago in Moscow to be held on Christmas Day. The champ opts to perform his training on enemy soil, working out at a barren Russian farmhouse. His Spartan, low-tech regimen--lifting boulders, dragging sledges, running up the Steppes in lieu of the Art Museum steps--is juxtaposed with Drago's extensively calibrated (and apparently chemically-enhanced) preparations. At zero hour, in front of a capacity crowd of hostile Muscovites, the Italian Stallion is ready to lock up, and let the best man--and ideology--win. Is the outcome ever really in doubt? Of course not. At a tidy 90 minutes, which included not one but two montages from the prior three films, Rocky IV is patently the work of a director with a story to tell and with only so many different ways to tell it. No matter how savage a pounding Rocky took at the hands of Drago, it was nothing compared to the one that was forthcoming from the critics. "[E]ach succeeding movie has become bigger, emptier, more preposterous. Noisier, too," wrote Sheila Benson of the Los Angeles Times. "Stallone has become a maniacally obvious pop demagogue--a cartoon master so manipulative that the whole audience can join in the joke of how dumb his films are," stated New York's David Denby. The jingoism might have been all too obvious, and out in the real world, as Rocky IV was being prepped for release, the Geneva Summit between the superpowers had brought U.S./Soviet tensions to their lowest ebb in generations. Still, Stallone showed that while he had savvy at punching his cinematic ring opponents, he was even better at punching the buttons of the mass audience. Rocky IV pulled in big box-office receipts during the 1985 holiday season. "[T]here's only one proper way to experience this," wrote Newsday's Mike McGrady, "and that with a full house of screaming, whistling, applauding fans who aren't inclined to be what you'd call overly critical." In the well-educated onetime bouncer/bodyguard/kickboxing champion Lundgren, Stallone found a fearsome and wholly credible Goliath for his parable. Over the years since, Lundgren has taken the cachet he gained from the role and parlayed it into a long string of leads in B-level actioners. Cast as Drago's Olympian wife and mouthpiece was Brigitte Nielsen, the six-foot Swedish model who was then the woman of the moment in Stallone's life. "She has heart, humor, beauty, athletic prowess, maternal instincts," Stallone told Rolling Stone from the set in 1985. "And she's classically true to her man--I mean, really dedicated to the maintaining and prolonging of this relationship. There's a permanency about it." For what it's worth, the couple wound up divorcing in 1987. Producer: James D. Brubaker, Robert Chartoff, Arthur Chobanian, Irwin Winkler Director: Sylvester Stallone Screenplay: Sylvester Stallone Cinematography: Bill Butler Film Editing: John W. Wheeler, Don Zimmerman Art Direction: Bill Kenney Music: Bill Conti, Vince DiCola, John Cafferty, Richard Drummie, Jim Peterik, Frankie Sullivan Cast: Sylvester Stallone (Rocky Balboa), Talia Shire (Adrian Balboa), Burt Young (Paulie), Carl Weathers (Apollo Creed), Brigitte Nielsen (Ludmilla), Dolph Lundgren (Drago). C-91m. Letterboxed. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 27, 1985

Released in USA on video.

Began shooting April 30, 1985.

Released in United States Fall November 27, 1985