Green Card


1h 48m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A French artist marries a lonely woman to win U.S. citizenship then falls in love with her.

Film Details

Also Known As
Gifta på låtsas, Greencard
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Atlab-Gold Coast, Australia; Completion Bond Company Inc; Duart Film And Video; Guiness Mahon & Company; Judy Garland & Associates; Panavision, Ltd.; Screen Australia; Soundfirm; Spectrum Films; Todd Thaler Casting; Touchstone Pictures
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Belga Films; Hoyts Distribution; Ugc; Ugc International; Village Roadshow Limited; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

A French musician emigrates to the United States and enters into a marriage of convenience in order to obtain a green card.

Crew

Bob Adams

Grip

Tom Allen

Property Master

John Anderson

Set Decorator

William Anderson

Editor

Todd Arnow

Production Controller

Antony Baldasare

Set Dresser

Carol Bawer

Production Assistant

Dana Belcastro

Assistant (To Ira Halberstadt)

Maria T. Bierniak

Location Assistant

Arthur Blum

Dolly Grip

Beth A Boyd

Office Assistant

Lynn Breschel

Electrician

Nicholas Breslin

Assistant Editor (Australia)

Joni Brockschmidt

Other

Steve Burgess

Foley (Australia)

Fran Burke

Title Design

Eva Z. Cabrera

Script Supervisor

Pierre Caillieriac

Production Assistant

Arthur Cambridge

Color Timer

Julius Chan

Other

Bernard Chaumeil

Boom Operator

Jeanine Chialvo

Dialogue Editor (Australia)

Jem Cohen

Assistant Property Master

Nicholas Cole

Assistant Editor (Australia)

Roger Cowland

Other

Dianne Crittenden

Casting

Katharine Curtis

Production Coordinator

Alan B. Curtiss

1st Assistant Director

Andrew J. Day

Bestboy Electric

June Decamp

Chargeman Scenic Artist

Carla Demolfetto

Craft Service

Joy Dickson

Casting Associate

Rosemary Dority

Post-Production Coordinator

David Dreishpoon

Craft Service

Francois Duhamel

Stills

Anthony Dunne

Construction Coordinator

Enya

Songs

Enya

Song Performer ("River" "Watermark" "Storms In Africa")

Edward Feldman

Executive Producer

Robert K. Feldmann

Key Grip

Ken Ferris

Camera Operator

Judie Fixler

Extras Casting

Mo Flam

Lighting

Sean Fuller

Electric Assistant

Pierre Gamet

Production Sound Mixer

Ole Georg

Music ("Remember Slow Fox?")

Jay Gibson

Production Assistant

Ted Glass

Set Decorator

Jean Gontier

Co-Producer

Jonathan Graham

Bestboy Grip

Bruno Guillochon

Additional Assistant Camera

Peter G Hackman

Standby Scenic Artist

Ira Halberstadt

Unit Production Manager

Andy Harris

2nd Assistant Camera

Duncan Henderson

Co-Producer

Sharon Ilson

Makeup Supervisor

Jennifer Ingram

Wardrobe Supervisor

Louise A Innes

Additional Editor (Australia)

Bette Iverson

Hair

Tanya Johnson

Production Assistant

Phil Judd

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Robin Judge

Assistant Editor (Australia)

I Kambanellis

Music ("Strossa Stroma Sou")

Kevin Keefe

Transportation Captain

Paul Kijzer

Financial Consultant

Joan Lafontaine

Assistant (To Edward S Feldman)

Simon Law

Song ("Holdin' On")

Rick Lisle

Assistant Editor (Australia)

Gerry Long

Foley (Australia)

Paula Lourie

Assistant Sound Editor (Australia)

Mike Love

Song ("Surfin' Usa")

Julian Macdonald

Apprentice Editor (Australia)

Bob Marshak

Stills

Marilyn Matthews

Associate Costume Designer

Heather Mcgrath

Office Assistant

Ian Mcloughlin

Technical Coordinator (Soundfirm)

Roseann Milano

Wardrobe Supervisor

Armen Minasian

Assistant Editor (Usa)

Brendan Morley

Music Engineer

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Music ("Clarinet Concerto In A Major: Adagio" "Flute Concerto Number 1 In G Major: Rondo And Adagio" "Flute And Harp Concerto In C Major: Andantino")

Kelly Muse

Office Assistant

Jeff Naparstek

Set Dresser

Kenneth D Nelson

Key Set Builder

Jan Nizen

Assistant Auditor

Christopher A. Nowak

Art Direction

Jayne Marla Nozik

Office Assistant

Megan O'brien

Production Assistant

Edward O'donnell

Transportation Coordinator

Michael Olatunji

Song

Michael Olatunji

Song Performer ("Oyin Momo Ado")

Emily Paine

Assistant Editor (Usa)

Wayne Pashley

Sound Effects Editor (Australia)

Michelle Pazer

Assistant Editor (Usa)

Ingrid Price

Wardrobe Supervisor

Karen Psaltis

Negative Cutter

Jack Ranson

Key Set Builder

Brian Regan

Electrician

Marie-pierre Renaud

Assistant Editor (Usa)

Jon Ringbom

Chargeman Scenic Artist

Beresford Romeo

Song ("Holdin' On")

Jane Rosenberg

Production Office Coordinator

John Rusk

2nd Assistant Director

Livia Ruzic

Dialogue Editor (Australia)

Liz Ryan

2nd Assistant Director

Nicky Ryan

Songs ("River" "Watermark" "Storms In Africa")

Roma Ryan

Songs ("River" "Watermark" "Storms In Africa")

Geoffrey Simpson

Dp/Cinematographer

Geoffrey Simpson

Director Of Photography

Lee Smith

Sound Design

Lee Smith

Additional Editor (Australia)

Lindsey Smith

Art Department Coordinator

Michele M Sommer

Assistant Property Master

Hans Stadlmair

Music Conductor ("Flute Concerto Number 1 In G Major: Rondo And Adagio")

Harry Stewart

Song ("Eyes On The Prize")

Wendy Stites

Production Designer

Richard Stolzman

Clarinet Player ("Clarinet Concerto In A Major: Adagio")

Lauren Beth Strogoff

Unit Publicist

Daniel Strol

Location Coordinator

Eric Swanek

1st Assistant Camera

Marcia Lappin Themelis

Location Manager

Mikos Theodorakis

Music ("Strossa Stroma Sou")

Zack Tobin

Construction Assistant

Peter Townsend

Sound Effects Editor (Australia)

Plummy Tucker

Apprentice Editor (Usa)

David S Tuttman

2nd Assistant Camera

Marie-france Vassel

Makeup (Gerard Depardieu)

Peter Von Bartheld

Set Dresser

Keith Wall

Set Dresser

Peter Weir

Producer

Peter Weir

Screenwriter

Andy Weltman

Assistant (To Peter Weir)

Karin Whittington

Dialogue Editor (Australia)

Brian Wilson

Song ("Surfin' Usa")

Larry Wright

Song Performer ("Subway Drums")

Larry Wright

Song

Hans Zimmer

Music

Rosie Zingalis

Seamstress

Film Details

Also Known As
Gifta på låtsas, Greencard
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Atlab-Gold Coast, Australia; Completion Bond Company Inc; Duart Film And Video; Guiness Mahon & Company; Judy Garland & Associates; Panavision, Ltd.; Screen Australia; Soundfirm; Spectrum Films; Todd Thaler Casting; Touchstone Pictures
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Belga Films; Hoyts Distribution; Ugc; Ugc International; Village Roadshow Limited; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Award Nominations

Best Original Screenplay

1990

Articles

Green Card


Australian film director Peter Weir is best known for his poignant, soul-searching dramas, ranging from Witness (1985) to Dead Poets Society (1989) to Fearless (1993). He's also known for giving challenging dramatic opportunities to actors as represented by Harrison Ford, Robin Williams, and Jeff Bridges, respectively, in the above films. (Add Jim Carrey to that list with The Truman Show in 1998). Weir fans eschew these commercial successes in favor of his earlier, edgier work such as the cult favorite Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) or Gallipoli (1981), starring a 25-year old Mel Gibson. What Weir is not well known for is romantic comedy so fans and critics were surprised with the release of Green Card in 1990, which was written and directed by Weir. A tale of love and immigration, it starred French actor Gerard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell. Cinema art house aficionados and champions of Weir's earlier work cried sell-out, but audiences were enchanted by Weir's uncharacteristic offering. The film was nominated for a Best Writing Oscar®, and it won Golden Globes for Best Comedy and Best Actor for Depardieu.

Depardieu was actually the inspiration for the film's creation; known as "The Gallic Giant", he remains France's most beloved actor with numerous awards for his work in such films as The Last Metro (1980), Jean de Florette (1986), and Cyrano de Bergerac (1990). Although he appeared with Robert De Niro in Bertolucci's1900 (1976), Depardieu had yet to make his English-speaking film debut. That all changed when Weir saw the actor's performance in Danton (1982) by Polish director Andrzej Wajda. Weir began reworking an old short story into a screenplay about a marriage of convenience: Georges (Depardieu) needs a Green Card, Bronte (MacDowell) must be married to be eligible to live in her dream apartment. For inspiration, Weir stuck a newspaper photo of Depardieu above his typewriter. True facts from Depardieu's life were also integrated into the script, including his fondness for prostitutes and his multiple tattoos. No one else was ever considered for the role.

Still, there were some obstacles to overcome during pre-production such as convincing the studio to finance this atypical Weir project, set in New York City, with a relatively unknown European in the leading role. There was even some concern about Depardieu's unconventional personality and whether Weir would be able to effectively direct him. But all of these issues were resolved and the only remaining hurdle was Depardieu's filming schedule, which would not be open for at least a year. The shoot was put on hold, but Weir made good use of the time, directing Dead Poets Society in the interim.

After Depardieu was cast, a yearlong search was launched for the leading lady. Selected for her natural on-screen chemistry with Depardieu, Andie MacDowell eventually won the role of the horticulturist ingenue (her dream apartment has a solarium). MacDowell's film debut in Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984) was inauspicious to say the least; her dialogue was ultimately dubbed over due to her strong Southern accent (Glenn Close did the honors). However, it was MacDowell's breakthrough performance in Steven Soderbergh's Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989) that brought her to Weir's attention. She was nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance in Green Card. Bebe Neuwirth and Robert Prosky are also memorable as supporting characters. Neuwirth, best known for her character Lilith in the television series Cheers and Frasier, is also a potent force on Broadway with her starring roles in such productions as Chicago. Prosky, a frequent Broadway actor as well, is best remembered as Sergeant Jablonski in television's Hill Street Blues.

Producer: Peter Weir, Jean Gontier, Duncan Henderson
Director: Peter Weir
Screenplay: Peter Weir
Production Design: Wendy Stites
Cinematography: Geoffrey Simpson
Costume Design: Marilyn Matthews
Film Editing: William M. Anderson
Original Music: Enya, Hans Zimmer
Cast: Gerard Depardieu (Georges), Andie MacDowell (Bronte Parrish), Bebe Neuwirth (Lauren), Greg Edelman (Phil), Robert Prosky (Bronte's Lawyer), Jessie Keosian (Mrs. Bird), Ethan Phillips (Gorsky), Mary Louise Wilson (Mrs. Sheehan), Lois Smith (Bronte's mother).
C-108m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Eleanor Quin
Green Card

Green Card

Australian film director Peter Weir is best known for his poignant, soul-searching dramas, ranging from Witness (1985) to Dead Poets Society (1989) to Fearless (1993). He's also known for giving challenging dramatic opportunities to actors as represented by Harrison Ford, Robin Williams, and Jeff Bridges, respectively, in the above films. (Add Jim Carrey to that list with The Truman Show in 1998). Weir fans eschew these commercial successes in favor of his earlier, edgier work such as the cult favorite Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) or Gallipoli (1981), starring a 25-year old Mel Gibson. What Weir is not well known for is romantic comedy so fans and critics were surprised with the release of Green Card in 1990, which was written and directed by Weir. A tale of love and immigration, it starred French actor Gerard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell. Cinema art house aficionados and champions of Weir's earlier work cried sell-out, but audiences were enchanted by Weir's uncharacteristic offering. The film was nominated for a Best Writing Oscar®, and it won Golden Globes for Best Comedy and Best Actor for Depardieu. Depardieu was actually the inspiration for the film's creation; known as "The Gallic Giant", he remains France's most beloved actor with numerous awards for his work in such films as The Last Metro (1980), Jean de Florette (1986), and Cyrano de Bergerac (1990). Although he appeared with Robert De Niro in Bertolucci's1900 (1976), Depardieu had yet to make his English-speaking film debut. That all changed when Weir saw the actor's performance in Danton (1982) by Polish director Andrzej Wajda. Weir began reworking an old short story into a screenplay about a marriage of convenience: Georges (Depardieu) needs a Green Card, Bronte (MacDowell) must be married to be eligible to live in her dream apartment. For inspiration, Weir stuck a newspaper photo of Depardieu above his typewriter. True facts from Depardieu's life were also integrated into the script, including his fondness for prostitutes and his multiple tattoos. No one else was ever considered for the role. Still, there were some obstacles to overcome during pre-production such as convincing the studio to finance this atypical Weir project, set in New York City, with a relatively unknown European in the leading role. There was even some concern about Depardieu's unconventional personality and whether Weir would be able to effectively direct him. But all of these issues were resolved and the only remaining hurdle was Depardieu's filming schedule, which would not be open for at least a year. The shoot was put on hold, but Weir made good use of the time, directing Dead Poets Society in the interim. After Depardieu was cast, a yearlong search was launched for the leading lady. Selected for her natural on-screen chemistry with Depardieu, Andie MacDowell eventually won the role of the horticulturist ingenue (her dream apartment has a solarium). MacDowell's film debut in Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984) was inauspicious to say the least; her dialogue was ultimately dubbed over due to her strong Southern accent (Glenn Close did the honors). However, it was MacDowell's breakthrough performance in Steven Soderbergh's Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989) that brought her to Weir's attention. She was nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance in Green Card. Bebe Neuwirth and Robert Prosky are also memorable as supporting characters. Neuwirth, best known for her character Lilith in the television series Cheers and Frasier, is also a potent force on Broadway with her starring roles in such productions as Chicago. Prosky, a frequent Broadway actor as well, is best remembered as Sergeant Jablonski in television's Hill Street Blues. Producer: Peter Weir, Jean Gontier, Duncan Henderson Director: Peter Weir Screenplay: Peter Weir Production Design: Wendy Stites Cinematography: Geoffrey Simpson Costume Design: Marilyn Matthews Film Editing: William M. Anderson Original Music: Enya, Hans Zimmer Cast: Gerard Depardieu (Georges), Andie MacDowell (Bronte Parrish), Bebe Neuwirth (Lauren), Greg Edelman (Phil), Robert Prosky (Bronte's Lawyer), Jessie Keosian (Mrs. Bird), Ethan Phillips (Gorsky), Mary Louise Wilson (Mrs. Sheehan), Lois Smith (Bronte's mother).C-108m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 23, 1990

Released in United States December 25, 1990

Wide Release in United States January 11, 1991

Released in United States on Video June 12, 1991

Released in United States February 1991

Shown at Belgrade International Film Festival February 1-10, 1991.

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (out of competition) February 15-26, 1991.

Completed shooting June 13, 1990.

Began shooting March 26, 1990.

First major English language feature for French actor Gerard Depardieu.

Released in United States Winter December 23, 1990

Released in United States December 25, 1990 (New York City)

Wide Release in United States January 11, 1991

Released in United States on Video June 12, 1991

Released in United States February 1991 (Shown at Belgrade International Film Festival February 1-10, 1991.)

Released in United States February 1991 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (out of competition) February 15-26, 1991.)