The Grissom Gang


2h 7m 1971

Brief Synopsis

In the 1920s, debutante Barbara Blandish is kidnapped and held for ransom by the half-witted, sadistic Grissom Gang, which is led by Gladys "Ma" Grissom. When one of the boys falls for Barbara, the family unity of the gang is disrupted, resulting in violence.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
May 1971
Premiere Information
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 May 1971
Production Company
ABC Pictures Corp.; Associates and Aldrich Co.
Distribution Company
Cinerama Releasing Corp.
Country
United States
Location
California, United States; California--Northern, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel No Orchids for Miss Blandish by René Raymond (London, 1939).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In rural Missouri, during a sweltering summer in the early 1930s, nightclub photographer Heinie tips off small-time hoodlums Ed Bailey, Frankie Connor and Sam that heiress Barbara Blandish will be wearing an expensive diamond necklace at a roadhouse that night. Intending to steal the necklace, the thugs approach Barbara as she is about to drive off with her boyfriend, Jerry McGowan. When Jerry resists, the thieves shoot him and in a panic, kidnap Barbara. Stopping at a gas station, Frankie phones his girl friend, singer Anna Borg, to tell her they will be hiding at Johnny Hutchins' shack in the country. By coincidence, fellow hoodlum Eddie Hagan, a member of the Grissom gang, stops at the station and sees the thugs drive away with Barbara. After hearing a radio broadcast about Barbara's kidnapping, Eddie ascertains from the gas station attendant, who overheard Frankie's conversation with Anna, that the thugs are headed for Johnny's shack. Soon after, Eddie, accompanied by three members of his gang, Slim Grissom, Woppy and Mace, arrives at Johnny's shack, where after killing Frankie, Bailey and Sam, they kidnap Barbara and pay Johnny to keep silent. At the squalid Grissom house, the sullen, spoiled Barbara tries to reason with Ma, the mustachioed matriarch of the gang, who decides to send a ransom notice to the heiress' wealthy father, John P. Blandish, demanding $1,000,000 for her return. Later, when Ma's husband Doc expresses misgivings about the kidnapping, Ma reassures him that only kidnappers who return their victims get caught, and she intends to "dispose" of Barbara. Upon receiving the ransom note, Blandish hires private detective Dave Fenner to act as a go-between. Meanwhile, Ma's psychopathic, simpleton son Slim becomes smitten with Barbara, who calls him a "filthy, cretin half-wit," sending him running out of the room, crying for Ma. After Ma retaliates by slugging Barbara and blackening her eye, Slim finds Barbara terrified, slumped across her bed. Slim kisses her, but when he realizes that he is impotent, he sprawls across her body and weeps. Once the ransom is paid, Ma proposes that they buy an interest in a Kansas City bar called Rocky's Café and convert it into a "swanky" speakeasy. When Eddie, a slick-haired dandy, taunts love-struck Slim about getting rid of the "broad," Slim declares that he will kill anyone who touches Barbara, including his own mother. Later, Ma and the others go to see Rocky to strike a deal about investing in his place. Also present is Anna, who performs there. Leering at Anna, Eddie follows her into her dressing room, where she points a gun at him and demands to know what happened to Frankie. After the wily Eddie lies that Frankie took Barbara and left town, Anna, thinking that Frankie double-crossed her, accepts Eddie's advances. Realizing that the gas station attendant and Heinie can link him to the kidnapping, Eddie kills the attendant, and after forcing Heinie to place an anonymous phone tip to the police identifying Frankie and Bailey as the kidnappers, kills him, too. Later, when Slim brags to Barbara that he "saved" her from being killed by the gang, she realizes that the ransom has been paid and that her life depends on keeping Slim happy. In an act of self-preservation, she seduces him, and upon waking up the next morning, sobs in degradation. The next day, Slim goes to town and returns wearing an ill-fitting suit and bearing gifts for Barbara. Meanwhile, determined to find Barbara, Fenner discusses the case with police chief McClaine, and although McClaine is certain that Barbara is dead, he recalls the anonymous phone call linking Frankie to the crime and suggests that Fenner talk to Anna. Two months later, Slim escorts Barbara to their new "love nest," a garish, windowless, two-room apartment, complete with a gold leaf toilet and monogrammed towels. Soon after, Fenner, posing as a New York theatrical agent, visits the ambitious Anna and informs her that a "millionaire" client of his is backing a Broadway play and wants her to be its star. When Fenner warns that Anna's past association with Frankie may damage her career and suggests that it could be counteracted if she could provide a clue to solve the kidnapping, Anna, blinded by dreams of stardom, reveals that Frankie told her he was going to Johnny's place on the day of the kidnapping. Just then, Eddie walks in the door and recognizes Fenner. After Fenner punches Eddie and leaves, Anna tells Eddie that she told Fenner about Frankie's phone call. Agitated, Eddie throws her on the floor, and when she pulls a gun, he shoots and kills her. Fenner then goes to see Johnny, and as they talk, the Grissom gang surrounds the house. Just as the gang hurls a grenade into the house, the police arrive and the gang quickly withdraws. Afterward, Slim discovers that Eddie has abducted Barbara and hurries to confront Eddie at his apartment. As Eddie assaults Barbara, Slim arrives, unsheathes his knife and maniacally stabs Eddie. Soon after, the police raid the speakeasy, and Ma, preparing for a fight to the death, readies her Tommygun. Doc, however, wants to surrender, and when he turns to leave, Ma guns him down. Arriving at Rocky's in the midst of a gun battle between the gang and the police, Slim and Barbara speed away with police motorcycles in pursuit. Upon stopping for gas, Slim learns from the attendant that there were no survivors in the "downtown" shootout. Driving off, Slim wails for his dead mother. Later, when Blandish sees Slim and Barbara's love nest, he declares with disgust, "She would be better off dead." That night, after their car runs out of gas, Slim and Barbara take refuge in the barn, but the farmer spots them and notifies the police. In the barn, after Slim declares he does not want to live without Barbara, she says that no one has ever loved her like that and tenderly kisses him. The next morning, Slim awakens to find that the police have surrounded the barn. McClaine has invited the press to cover the story, and Fenner and Blandish are there, too. When McClaine orders Slim to surrender, Slim fires his gun, then steps out of the barn holding his weapon. After the police riddle him with bullets, Barbara tentatively comes to the door, kneels over Slim's body and sobs. Sickened, Blandish orders her to get away from Slim, and although she asserts she was only trying to stay alive, he tells her that Fenner will look after her, then walks off.

Crew

Fred Ahern

Prod Supervisor

Robert Aldrich

Producer

William Aldrich

Assistant to the prod

Jean Austin

Hairstylist

Harry Barris

Composer

Kenny Bell

Stills

Joseph Biroc

Director of Photography

Walter Blake

Associate Producer

Harry Brooks

Composer

John W. Brown

Set Decoration

Richard Church

Sound

Gordon Clifford

Composer

Mickey Cureton

Cable

Dave Davies

Unit Publicist

Lucia De Martino

Women's Wardrobe

Dorothy Fields

Composer

Morris Finegold

Boom Operator

Gerald Fried

Music

Robert Gary

Script Supervisor

Paul Gilbert

Electrician eng

Leon Griffiths

Screenwriter

Gil Haimson

Assistant Camera

Orville Hallberg

Camera Operator

William Hannah

Gaffer

Malcolm Harding

Assistant Director

Patricia Heade

Production Assistant

Joe Jackman

Camera Operator

Charlie James

Men's Wardrobe Supervisor

Norma Koch

Costume Design

John La Salandra

Const Coordinator

Maurice Larson

Painter

Milo Lory

Sound Effects

Michael Luciano

Film Editor

George Maly

Recording

Jimmy Mchugh

Composer

Robert Merry

Best Boy

Henry Millar

Special Effects

Pat Miller

Transportation

William Morrison

2d Assistant Director

Rik Nervik

Assistant Camera

Scott Perry Jr.

Music Editor

Don Pringle

Greensman

Andy Razaf

Composer

Don Record

Titles Designer

Alex Romero

Choreography

Paul Schwake Jr.

Head grip

Ygnacio Sepulveda

Props Master

Robert Sherman

Dial Supervisor

Lynn Stalmaster

Casting

Harry W. Tetrick

Recording Supervisor

William Turner

Makeup

Frank J. Urioste

Associate Editor

James Dowell Vance

Art Director

Thomas "fats" Waller

Composer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
May 1971
Premiere Information
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 May 1971
Production Company
ABC Pictures Corp.; Associates and Aldrich Co.
Distribution Company
Cinerama Releasing Corp.
Country
United States
Location
California, United States; California--Northern, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel No Orchids for Miss Blandish by René Raymond (London, 1939).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The Grissom Gang on DVD


Robert Aldrich's Bonnie & Clyde-style rural gangster epic tells the story of the Ma Barker gang from a different angle and comes up as one of his less exciting movies. The performances are all good but the film lacks a sense of humor or other hook to keep us interested for its unusually long running time. Kim Darby and Scott Wilson's star-crossed 'romance' is doomed from the outset, so there's little fun to be had on the way. And Aldrich's hard-slugging style often overpowers the material.

Synopsis: Three punks steal a diamond necklace from young heiress Barbara Blandish (Kim Darby) but foolishly kidnap her after shooting her boyfriend dead. A band of rural bandits run by the tyrannical Gladys 'Ma' Grissom (Irene Dailey) kill the punks and ransom Barbara as their own prize. Slick hood Eddie Hagan (Tony Musante) isn't perturbed by Ma's decision to kill Barbara after the ransom is paid, but her dim-witted son Slim (Scott Wilson) becomes pathologically attached to his prisoner, cleaning himself up to be worthy of her. Meanwhile, Barbara's father John Blandish (Wesley Addy) hires detective Dave Fenner (Robert Lansing), who gets a lead on the Grissoms through nightclub singer Anna Borg (Connie Stevens). The only problem is that after he finds out that Barbara has been sleeping with a degenerate hoodlum, Dad might not want his daughter back.

Robert Aldrich started as the leading edge in liberal outrage, seeking out hypocrisy in detective thrillers (Kiss Me Deadly), war stories (Attack! ) and even adventure tales (Ten Seconds to Hell, The Flight of the Phoenix). His films often hit a raw nerve with themes of suicide, madness, destruction and even the end of the world. He directed for drama but was not the best director of actors; talents like Ernest Borgnine tended to overact in his movies.

The Grissom Gang is a generic gangster story that alternates between action scenes and intimate dramatic material. Aldrich handles the drama as if it were action and lets the action go over the top. The repetitive bloody slayings of at least a dozen characters soon lose their punch. The only 70s director who made gangster violence even more monotonous was John Milius in his Dillinger; both films would be twice as good if they surprised us once in a while with a killing handled in some way other than point-blank mayhem. Nobody ever misses, everyone gushes crimson paint when shot, and many scenes add unpleasant details, like a photographer-snitch who winds up dead in a urinal.

The same problem infects many of the dramatic scenes, which are all well-acted except for Irene Dailey's Ma, who is so ferocious we think she's going to bite her own tongue off. Tony Musante, Robert Lansing and even Connie Stevens are quite good, but most of the action runs the standard gangster playbook (violence, betrayals, payback) with only the nasty violence to distinguish it. Almost all of the characters have a permanent coating of dripping wet perspiration on their faces, a perhaps realistic touch that nevertheless seems forced.

The underrated Scott Wilson and Kim Darby (late of True Grit and a host of lesser efforts) get all of the sentimental attention. Wilson's Slim starts out as a loutish oaf and slowly transforms himself into Barbara's noble protector. The captive debutante eventually responds with affection to his genuine concern, opening her heart when Slim finally states he'd rather die than see them parted. Any hopes for a tender ending are thwarted by the ugly spectacle of Barbara's millionaire father rejecting her for giving herself to her captor. The film ends like The Searchers, but nobody is redeemed. Aldrich would have made a better picture if The Grissom Gang had a more interesting point to make.

The Grissom Gang isn't the strongest production, as interiors lack a lived-in feeling and frequent zooms negate the period tone. At one point Slim installs Barbara in a garishly decorated apartment-prison decorated in a hash of bizarre styles that just don't belong in the early 1930s. When the plot narrows down to a series of knife slayings and machine gun standoffs (Ma's nightclub has steel shutters, like Tony Camonte's in Scarface), it's just a bloodier version of something we've seen many times before.

MGM's DVD of The Grissom Gang is part of its ABC acquisition deal and comes in a very good enhanced anamorphic transfer. Grainy shots appear to have been shot that way, and even though many colors are subdued, all the splattering hemoglobin is as red as can be. There are no extras.

For more information about The Grissom Gang, visit MGM DVD. To order The Grissom Gang, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
The Grissom Gang On Dvd

The Grissom Gang on DVD

Robert Aldrich's Bonnie & Clyde-style rural gangster epic tells the story of the Ma Barker gang from a different angle and comes up as one of his less exciting movies. The performances are all good but the film lacks a sense of humor or other hook to keep us interested for its unusually long running time. Kim Darby and Scott Wilson's star-crossed 'romance' is doomed from the outset, so there's little fun to be had on the way. And Aldrich's hard-slugging style often overpowers the material. Synopsis: Three punks steal a diamond necklace from young heiress Barbara Blandish (Kim Darby) but foolishly kidnap her after shooting her boyfriend dead. A band of rural bandits run by the tyrannical Gladys 'Ma' Grissom (Irene Dailey) kill the punks and ransom Barbara as their own prize. Slick hood Eddie Hagan (Tony Musante) isn't perturbed by Ma's decision to kill Barbara after the ransom is paid, but her dim-witted son Slim (Scott Wilson) becomes pathologically attached to his prisoner, cleaning himself up to be worthy of her. Meanwhile, Barbara's father John Blandish (Wesley Addy) hires detective Dave Fenner (Robert Lansing), who gets a lead on the Grissoms through nightclub singer Anna Borg (Connie Stevens). The only problem is that after he finds out that Barbara has been sleeping with a degenerate hoodlum, Dad might not want his daughter back. Robert Aldrich started as the leading edge in liberal outrage, seeking out hypocrisy in detective thrillers (Kiss Me Deadly), war stories (Attack! ) and even adventure tales (Ten Seconds to Hell, The Flight of the Phoenix). His films often hit a raw nerve with themes of suicide, madness, destruction and even the end of the world. He directed for drama but was not the best director of actors; talents like Ernest Borgnine tended to overact in his movies. The Grissom Gang is a generic gangster story that alternates between action scenes and intimate dramatic material. Aldrich handles the drama as if it were action and lets the action go over the top. The repetitive bloody slayings of at least a dozen characters soon lose their punch. The only 70s director who made gangster violence even more monotonous was John Milius in his Dillinger; both films would be twice as good if they surprised us once in a while with a killing handled in some way other than point-blank mayhem. Nobody ever misses, everyone gushes crimson paint when shot, and many scenes add unpleasant details, like a photographer-snitch who winds up dead in a urinal. The same problem infects many of the dramatic scenes, which are all well-acted except for Irene Dailey's Ma, who is so ferocious we think she's going to bite her own tongue off. Tony Musante, Robert Lansing and even Connie Stevens are quite good, but most of the action runs the standard gangster playbook (violence, betrayals, payback) with only the nasty violence to distinguish it. Almost all of the characters have a permanent coating of dripping wet perspiration on their faces, a perhaps realistic touch that nevertheless seems forced. The underrated Scott Wilson and Kim Darby (late of True Grit and a host of lesser efforts) get all of the sentimental attention. Wilson's Slim starts out as a loutish oaf and slowly transforms himself into Barbara's noble protector. The captive debutante eventually responds with affection to his genuine concern, opening her heart when Slim finally states he'd rather die than see them parted. Any hopes for a tender ending are thwarted by the ugly spectacle of Barbara's millionaire father rejecting her for giving herself to her captor. The film ends like The Searchers, but nobody is redeemed. Aldrich would have made a better picture if The Grissom Gang had a more interesting point to make. The Grissom Gang isn't the strongest production, as interiors lack a lived-in feeling and frequent zooms negate the period tone. At one point Slim installs Barbara in a garishly decorated apartment-prison decorated in a hash of bizarre styles that just don't belong in the early 1930s. When the plot narrows down to a series of knife slayings and machine gun standoffs (Ma's nightclub has steel shutters, like Tony Camonte's in Scarface), it's just a bloodier version of something we've seen many times before. MGM's DVD of The Grissom Gang is part of its ABC acquisition deal and comes in a very good enhanced anamorphic transfer. Grainy shots appear to have been shot that way, and even though many colors are subdued, all the splattering hemoglobin is as red as can be. There are no extras. For more information about The Grissom Gang, visit MGM DVD. To order The Grissom Gang, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The opening and ending cast credits differ in order, with Connie Stevens being listed "and Connie Stevens as Anna" at the end of the opening credits. The onscreen credits list a 1971 copyright for ABC Pictures Corp., but the film was not registered for copyright. Although the novel was credited onscreen to author James Hadley Chase, it was first published in London under the author's real name, René Raymond. When the novel was published in the United States in 1942, Raymond used the pseudonym James Hadley Chase.
       In an interview with producer-director Robert Aldrich printed in a contemporary source, Aldrich stated that the film originally ended with "Barbara" committing suicide by jumping into the river. That version was shown several times, Aldrich noted, but after the audience reacted unfavorably, he decided that because Barbara's life was already ruined, having her commit suicide would have been redundant. James Hadley Chase's novel ended with Barbara killing herself by jumping out the barn window.
       According to publicity materials in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library, location shooting was done in Northern California and in Los Angeles County. Chase's novel also served as the basis for the 1948 British film No Orchids for Miss Blandish, directed by St. John Legh Clowes and starring Linden Travers and Jack La Rue, and the 1975 French film Flesh for the Orchid, directed by Patrice Chéreau and starring Charlotte Rampling and Bruno Cremer.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1971

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States 1971

Released in United States 1994 (Shown in New York City (Walter Reade) as part of program "Apocalypse Anytime! The Films of Robert Aldrich" March 11 - April 8, 1994.)