Uncle Buck


1h 35m 1989

Brief Synopsis

A ne'er-do-well bachelor tries to bond with his nieces and nephew when he's forced to baby-sit.

Film Details

Also Known As
oncle Buck
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1989
Production Company
Jeffrey A. Williams
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Skokie, Illinois, USA; Wilmette, Illinois, USA; Northbrook, Illinois, USA; Evanston, Illinois, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

A confirmed bachelor finds himself in charge of a nephew and two nieces, ages 6 through 15.

Crew

Paul Adler

Casting Associate

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

Gary Alexander

Sound

James Alexander

Sound Mixer

James M Arnett

Stunt Coordinator

Jacki Arthur

Assistant

Jacolyn Baker

Location Manager

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Tom Belford

Sound Editor

Ken Blazer

Stunts

Alan C. Blomquist

Production Manager

Ralf D Bode

Director Of Photography

Ralf D Bode

Other

Len Borgrebbe

Props

Mark Bourgeois

Production Assistant

Stephen Bradarich

Video Playback

Charles J Brady

Craft Service

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

Bill Brown

Associate Producer

Danny Cangemi

Special Effects

Jeff Carson

Music Editor

Julie Chandler

Script Supervisor

Daniel Clancy

On-Set Dresser

John W Corso

Production Designer

Michelle Crenshaw

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael D Cronin

Other

Jim M Davis

Foreman

Jenny Elliot

Wardrobe

Bob Elmore

Stunts

Ellen Elphand

Apprentice

Jerrie Fowler

Assistant Editor

Forrest L Futrell

Assistant Director

Kenneth J Gagnon

Construction Coordinator

Miranda Garrison

Choreographer

Stan Gilbert

Adr Supervisor

Ilene Girdini

Costumes

William S Grisco

Animal Trainer

John Hardy

Transportation Co-Captain

Ray Hartwick

Production Manager

Ray Hartwick

Executive Producer

D. M. Hemphill

Sound

Frank Hernandez

Assistant

James F Hogan

Transportation Captain

Stephen Hollocker

Production Assistant

Steven C Homma

Other

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Holly Hudacek

Other

John Hughes

Screenplay

John Hughes

Producer

Steven Husch

Props

Mort Hyatt

Generator Operator

Tom Jacobson

Producer

Jeff Jarvis

Special Effects Coordinator

Chris Jenkins

Sound

Thomas M Jones

On-Set Dresser

David Kelley

Assistant Director

Byron Kelly

Production Assistant

Tom Kramer

Music Editor

Doug Kraner

Consultant

John Lafferty

Assistant Editor

Adena Lazan

Accountant

Ron Leahy

Lighting Technician

Shari Leibowitz

Production Coordinator

Daniel J Lester

Costume Supervisor

Morgan Michael Lewis

Key Grip

Gina Lombardo

Assistant Editor

Lou Lombardo

Editor

Tony Lombardo

Editor

Greg Lundsgaard

Other

Greg Lundsgaard

Director Of Photography

Patrick J Lynn

Transportation Co-Captain

Mel P Mack

Electrician

Tom Mack

Assistant Director

Louis Mann

Assistant Art Director

Mark E Matthys

Grip

Dan May

Set Decorator

Amie Frances Mccarthy-winn

Props

Dan Mckenzie

Grip

Ron Mcleish

Lighting Technician

Roy A Mcleish

Electrician

Danial A Miller

Dolly Grip

Hope Mitchel

Production Assistant

Stefanie A Moore

Assistant Director

David Morenz

Assistant Camera Operator

Brenda L Morris

Assistant

Sharon Morrissette

Construction

Jerry Moss

Property Master

Ira Newborn

Music

James Nezda

Location Assistant

Mary Nitti

Production Assistant

Ben Nye Jr.

Makeup

Edward M O'malley

Assistant Editor

James O Oakes

Dolly Grip

Armand Paoletti

Transportation Coordinator

Jeff Passanante

Construction Coordinator

Ron Payne

Music Coordinator

Manny Perry

Stunts

Jolanta T Piwowarczyk

Auditor

Peck Prior

Editor

Anne Rapp

Script Supervisor

Linda R Rizzuto

Hair

Silvio Scarano

Costumes

Robert Schick

Production Assistant

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

Tim Silano

Assistant Editor

Suzanne Smith

Casting Associate

Paul Stanwyck

Other

Wylie Stateman

Sound Editor

Michael L Stone

Camera Operator

William F Stuebe

Production

John Swander

Lighting Technician

Robert S. Swander

Lighting Technician

Tony Taurus

Assistant Editor

Dione Taylor

Hair

Karen Teicher

Assistant

Alex Touyarot

Assistant Camera Operator

Tom Udell

Unit Manager

Mark Valenti

Researcher

Marilyn Vance-straker

Costume Designer

Jane Vickerilla

Assistant

Fred C Vitale

Apprentice

John A Waldo

Assistant Camera Operator

Ramey Ellis Ward

Associate Producer

Jeanne Weber

Technical Advisor

Jamie Sue Weiss

Makeup

Dean E Williams

Photography

Jeffrey A. Williams

Cable Operator

Jacob Zawacki

Foreman

Film Details

Also Known As
oncle Buck
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1989
Production Company
Jeffrey A. Williams
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Skokie, Illinois, USA; Wilmette, Illinois, USA; Northbrook, Illinois, USA; Evanston, Illinois, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Uncle Buck


At the end of the eighties, director John Hughes returned to his beloved suburban Chicago to film his latest comedy, Uncle Buck (1989). Starring John Candy, the film chronicles the reentry of a pariah into his brother's family. When an unexpected family emergency calls the parents out of town, they reluctantly call Uncle Buck to take care of the children in their absence. Their anxiety is understandable: unemployed Buck chomps on cigars, has a car that backfires like a cannon, and gleefully threatens his niece's ratty boyfriend with a hatchet. As the tagline advertised, "He's crude. He's crass. He's family." Candy was a natural choice for Hughes in the starring role - he co-starred with Steve Martin in the immensely successful Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (1987), a film Hughes both wrote and directed. Macaulay Culkin, a little-known child actor, was cast as Buck's inquisitive nephew. Hughes was so impressed by the boy's comedic talent that he recommended him for the lead in one of his next scripts, to be directed by Christopher Columbus. The film was Home Alone (1990), which launched Culkin to kiddie super-stardom.

Amy Madigan was cast as Candy's long-suffering girlfriend. Madigan was having a banner year, coming off the success of Field of Dreams (1989), in which she played Kevin Costner's spirited wife. Her daughter in that film was Gaby Hoffmann, here cast as the youngest niece in Uncle Buck. Madigan, nominated in 1986 for a supporting Oscar® for Twice in a Lifetime (1985), is known for her staunch Hollywood politics, along with husband Ed Harris. Their silent protestation of Elia Kazan's 2000 honorary Oscar® remains one of the controversial moments in Academy history. Gaby Hoffmann, now in her early twenties, had a memorable supporting role in You Can Count on Me (2000), among other indie productions. Jean Louisa Kelly, in her debut role, nailed the part of sulky, rebellious teen - the child who gives Buck the most grief. Kelly currently stars in the television sitcom Yes, Dear (2000-present), and also had a featured role in Mr. Holland's Opus (1995), starring Richard Dreyfuss.

Playing the nosy and oversexed neighbor is Laurie Metcalf, best known as Roseanne's beleaguered sister during the long-running sitcom (1988-1997). Metcalf, a founding member of the famed Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago--along with John Malkovich and Gary Sinise--gained critical notice in Oliver Stone's JFK (1991). There are a couple of surprising bit parts in Uncle Buck attentive viewers might pick up on; the part of a school child is played by Anna Chlumsky. Two years later, she would go on to star in My Girl (1991), with Macaulay Culkin. And an "additional voice" is supplied by Patricia Arquette, who starred in David Lynch's Lost Highway (1997), but is perhaps better known as the sister of Courtney and David, not to mention being an ex-Mrs. Nicolas Cage.

Uncle Buck was enough of a hit to spawn a television series, although the original creator didn't even know about it: in an interview, Hughes explains: "Uncle Buck [the television series] I knew nothing about until the producers asked me if they could use some of the exterior footage. That's when I got to put my foot down - `No [expletive] way! I'm a DGA member! Go get your own!" Not one to mince words, Hughes got karmic revenge: the series was a flop. The film, however, continues to build a devoted following, made even more bittersweet by Candy's passing in 1994.

Producer: Bill Brown, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson
Director: John Hughes
Screenplay: John Hughes
Cinematography: Ralf Bode
Film Editing: Lou Lombardo, Tony Lombardo, Peck Prior
Art Direction: John W. Corso, Doug Kraner
Music: Ira Newborn
Cast: John Candy (Uncle Buck Russell), Amy Madigan (Chanice Kobolowski), Jean Louisa Kelly (Tia Russell), Gaby Hoffmann (Maizy Russell), Macaulay Culkin (Miles Russell), Elaine Bromka (Cindy Russell).
C-100m. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin
Uncle Buck

Uncle Buck

At the end of the eighties, director John Hughes returned to his beloved suburban Chicago to film his latest comedy, Uncle Buck (1989). Starring John Candy, the film chronicles the reentry of a pariah into his brother's family. When an unexpected family emergency calls the parents out of town, they reluctantly call Uncle Buck to take care of the children in their absence. Their anxiety is understandable: unemployed Buck chomps on cigars, has a car that backfires like a cannon, and gleefully threatens his niece's ratty boyfriend with a hatchet. As the tagline advertised, "He's crude. He's crass. He's family." Candy was a natural choice for Hughes in the starring role - he co-starred with Steve Martin in the immensely successful Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (1987), a film Hughes both wrote and directed. Macaulay Culkin, a little-known child actor, was cast as Buck's inquisitive nephew. Hughes was so impressed by the boy's comedic talent that he recommended him for the lead in one of his next scripts, to be directed by Christopher Columbus. The film was Home Alone (1990), which launched Culkin to kiddie super-stardom. Amy Madigan was cast as Candy's long-suffering girlfriend. Madigan was having a banner year, coming off the success of Field of Dreams (1989), in which she played Kevin Costner's spirited wife. Her daughter in that film was Gaby Hoffmann, here cast as the youngest niece in Uncle Buck. Madigan, nominated in 1986 for a supporting Oscar® for Twice in a Lifetime (1985), is known for her staunch Hollywood politics, along with husband Ed Harris. Their silent protestation of Elia Kazan's 2000 honorary Oscar® remains one of the controversial moments in Academy history. Gaby Hoffmann, now in her early twenties, had a memorable supporting role in You Can Count on Me (2000), among other indie productions. Jean Louisa Kelly, in her debut role, nailed the part of sulky, rebellious teen - the child who gives Buck the most grief. Kelly currently stars in the television sitcom Yes, Dear (2000-present), and also had a featured role in Mr. Holland's Opus (1995), starring Richard Dreyfuss. Playing the nosy and oversexed neighbor is Laurie Metcalf, best known as Roseanne's beleaguered sister during the long-running sitcom (1988-1997). Metcalf, a founding member of the famed Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago--along with John Malkovich and Gary Sinise--gained critical notice in Oliver Stone's JFK (1991). There are a couple of surprising bit parts in Uncle Buck attentive viewers might pick up on; the part of a school child is played by Anna Chlumsky. Two years later, she would go on to star in My Girl (1991), with Macaulay Culkin. And an "additional voice" is supplied by Patricia Arquette, who starred in David Lynch's Lost Highway (1997), but is perhaps better known as the sister of Courtney and David, not to mention being an ex-Mrs. Nicolas Cage. Uncle Buck was enough of a hit to spawn a television series, although the original creator didn't even know about it: in an interview, Hughes explains: "Uncle Buck [the television series] I knew nothing about until the producers asked me if they could use some of the exterior footage. That's when I got to put my foot down - `No [expletive] way! I'm a DGA member! Go get your own!" Not one to mince words, Hughes got karmic revenge: the series was a flop. The film, however, continues to build a devoted following, made even more bittersweet by Candy's passing in 1994. Producer: Bill Brown, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson Director: John Hughes Screenplay: John Hughes Cinematography: Ralf Bode Film Editing: Lou Lombardo, Tony Lombardo, Peck Prior Art Direction: John W. Corso, Doug Kraner Music: Ira Newborn Cast: John Candy (Uncle Buck Russell), Amy Madigan (Chanice Kobolowski), Jean Louisa Kelly (Tia Russell), Gaby Hoffmann (Maizy Russell), Macaulay Culkin (Miles Russell), Elaine Bromka (Cindy Russell). C-100m. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video January 25, 1990

Released in United States Summer August 16, 1989

Began shooting January 14, 1989.

Released in United States on Video January 25, 1990

Released in United States Summer August 16, 1989