School Daze


1h 54m 1988

Brief Synopsis

Homecoming at a southern college.

Film Details

Also Known As
Aulas turbulentas
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Morehouse, Georgia, USA; Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Brooklyn, New York, USA; Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Morris Brown College, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

Homecoming at a southern college.

Cast

Laurence Fishburne

Giancarlo Esposito

Spike Lee

Leonard Thomas

Harold Kohon

Performer

Ellen Holly

Dominic Hoffman

Cleopas Johnson

Alan Ward

Alpha Kappa Alpha

Morehouse College Students

Bill Lee

Phyllis Hyman

Earl Gardner

Performer

Stanley Hunte

Performer

Paul Peabody

Performer

Robert L Cole

Jue Yao

Performer

Angela Ali

Roy Johnson

Thomas Mckiver

Tracy Robinson

Monique Mannen

Toni Ann Johnson

Sandra Billingslea

Performer

Darryl M Bell

Alba Domini Leone

Lead Person

Lewis Eley

Performer

Angela Lewis

Alfred Wyatt

Regis Iandiorio

Performer

Sanford Allen

Performer

John Longo

Performer

Michelle Bailey

Rusty Cundieff

Cylk Cozart

John Pintavalle

Performer

Sharon Ferrol

Kelly Woolfolk

Traci Tracey

Tim Hutchinson

Derrek W Jones

Keith John

Gregory Elliot

Guy Killum

Ivan Goff

Alva Rogers

Tyra Ferrell

Paula Brown

Kevin Rock

Coach Pritchard

Frances Morgan

Gayle Dixon

Performer

Jacquelyn Bird

Kyme

John Purcell

Performer

Darryl Hayes

Harold Jones

Performer

R Hendrickson

Performer

Laura Smith

Performer

Jhoe Breedlove

Florante P. Galvez

Joe Seneca

Kent Wood

Sharon Owens

Rod Hodge

Patmore Lewis

Performer

Cecil Bridgewater

Performer

Consuela Lee Morehead

Valentino Jackson

Noel Dacosta

Performer

Marion Dinheiro

Performer

Cinque Lee

Edward Henderson

William N Ross

Delphine T Mantz

Tracey Coley

Performer

Dawn Jackson

Dennis Abrams

Edward G Bridges

Greta Martin

Laurnea Wilkerson

Roger Smith

Isaac Greggs

Mike Taylor

Jenario Foxx

Lester Mccorn

Howard University Students

Terri Lynette Whitlow

Barry Finclair

Performer

Tisha Campbell-martin

James Cheeseman

Performer

Cassi Davis

Erik Todd Dellums

William Morgan Sheppard

Clark College Students

Kirk Taylor

Tanya Lynne Lee

Elliot Rosoff

Performer

Stephanie Clark

Anthony Thompkins

Art Evans

Kappa Alpha Psi

Albert Cooper

Coach Hunt

Leslie Sykes

Cecelia Hobbs

Performer

Virgil Jones

Performer

Gregory Komar

Performer

William Easley

Performer

Jon Faddis

Performer

Spelman College Students

Joe Chambers

Samuel L. Jackson

William House

Kadeem Hardison

Reginald Tabor

Terence Blanchard

Performer

Eartha Robinson

Louann Montesi

Performer

Jasmine Guy

Michelle Whitney-morrison

Ossie Davis

A.j. Johnson

Delta Sigma Theta

Bill Nunn

Omega Psi Phi

Harold L Boyd

James Bond

D Stuckenbruck

Performer

Patience Higgins

Performer

Karen Owens

Branford Marsalis

Harold Vick

Liz Sciabarra

Gregg Burge

Frank Wang

Performer

Winterton Garvey

Performer

Edward Preston

Performer

Joie Lee

Keith Wright

Eric A Payne

Atlanta University Students

Tracey Lewis

Morehouse College Cheerleaders

Paula Birth

Richard F Gordon

Kasi Lemmons

Phi Beta Sigma

Crew

Roland Alexander

Music

Johnathan Alvarado

Other

Patrick Amos

Other

Norman Andrews

Assistant Camera Operator

Louis Bailey

Production Assistant

Devonne Baker

Other

George Balomes

Other

Larry Banks

Gaffer

Julian Barber

Music

Sean Barnave

Other

Kenny Barron

Other

Roderick Belin

Other

William Bennett

Grip

Norman Bielowicz

Assistant

Tony Bingham

Other

Grace Blake

Executive Producer

Shirlene Alicia Blake

Assistant Director

Cliff Booker

Other

Zelmer Bothic

Technical Advisor

Alfred Brown

Music

Alton Brown

Steadicam Operator

Barry Alexander Brown

Editor

Uzee Brown

Music Arranger

Carol Buck

Other

Allan Bullard

Grip

Ron L Burchfield

Grip

Tommie Burns

Other

Bill Butler

Driver

Marivee Cade

Gaffer

Byron Cage

Other

Tisha Campbell-martin

Song Performer

Ruth Carter

Costume Designer

Parnes Cartwright

Assistant Director

Lou Cerborino

Music Editor

Joe Chambers

Music

Vincent Chauncey

Music

Vincent Chauncey

Other

Larry M. Cherry

Hairdresser

Arthur Clark

Other

John Clark

Music

John Clark

Other

Luther Conley

Other

Robert Connor

Other

Addison Cook

Electrician

Albert Cooper

Transportation Coordinator

Jeffrey Cooper

Production Assistant

Stanley Cowell

Other

Eric Curtright

Other

Todd Daniels

Other

Edsel Davis

Other

Illya Davis

Other

Wesley Days

Other

Giorgio Desaint Angelo

Assistant

Stuart Deutsch

Boom Operator

Ron Devaughn

Other

Ernest Dickerson

Director Of Photography

Michael V Dicosimo

Consultant

Acua Dixon

Other

Everett Douglas

Construction

Miranda Dowdy

Other

Karen Dreyfus

Music

James Duke

Other

David Elliott

Best Boy

Perry Ellis

Assistant

Troy Ellis

Other

Eddie Evans

Grip

Clare Fisher

Music Arranger

Tom Fleischman

Sound

Michael Fleming

Music

Stewart Flemister

Other

Randy Fletcher

Assistant Director

Stanley Forman

Consultant

Eileen Fosom

Other

Hillary Francais

Casting Associate

Crystal Garner

Music

Rudy Gaskins

Sound Editor

J Kathleen Gibson

Sound Editor

Roderick Giles

Assistant Director

Francois Girbaud

Assistant

Marithe Girbaud

Assistant

Ron Goldsmith

On-Set Dresser

Harley Gould

Construction

Stefan Gresham

Other

Andre Griffin

Other

Fred Griffin

Music

Fred Griffin

Other

Portia Griffin

Song Performer

Juliet Haffner

Music

Curtis Harmon

Music

John Harris

Assistant Art Director

Tina Harris

Song

Tyrone Harris

Location Scout

Donald Harrison

Music

Dyane Harvey

Choreographer

Emanuel Henighan

Other

Samuel Henriques

Assistant Camera Operator

Haywood Henry

Other

Milt Hinton

Music

Michael Hitchcock

Art Department

Felicia Hokins

Other

Samuel Howard

Other

Alison Howard-smith

Assistant

Stanley Hunte

Music Contractor

Graig Hutchinson

Auditor

Phyllis Hyman

Song Performer

Jennifer Ingram

Wardrobe Supervisor

Pamm Jackson

Assistant

Kenton Jakub

Sound Editor

Jack Jeffers

Other

Teddy Jenkins

Hair

Teddy Jenkins

Makeup

Keith John

Song Performer

Carl Johnson

Electrician

John R Johnson

Construction

Michael Johnson

Other

Patrice Johnson

Costumes

Rhett Johnson

Construction

Lisa Jones

Assistant Director

Loretha Jones

Coproducer

Raymond Jones

Song

Stephanie Jones

Production Assistant

Steve Jones

Production

Matia Karrell

Production Manager

Kim Kearse

Other

Mark Kellar

Other

Mustapha Khan

Camera Assistant

Mustapha Khan

Production Assistant

Gretchen Kibbe

Other

Scott King

Other

Kenny Kirkland

Other

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Foley Editor

Dan Korintus

Sound Editor

Kyme

Song Performer

Irby Langley

Construction Coordinator

Bill Lee

Music Conductor

Bill Lee

Original Music

Bill Lee

Song

Cinque Lee

Apprentice

David C. Lee

Photography

Kevin Lee

Sound Editor

Spike Lee

Producer

Spike Lee

Screenplay

Scott Leftridge

Dolly Grip

Jesse Levine

Music

James Lloyd

Other

Todd Macnicholl

Key Grip

Gary Maddox

Other

Mario Majette

Other

Ray Mantia

Music

Suzi Margolin

Property Master

Branford Marsalis

Music

Herman Masoln

Consultant

John Massie

Electrician

Anthony Mays

Other

Joseph M Mcculloch

Best Boy

Warren Mckenna

Other

Maurice Mcrae

Other

Casasndra Mcsheppard

Other

Marcus Miller

Song

Grover Mitchell

Other

John Monroe

Driver

Mark Moore

Best Boy

Consuela Lee Morehead

Song

Consuela Lee Morehead

Music Supervisor

David Morrow

Music

Bruce Morton

Production Assistant

Reni Mosley

Other

Cedric Napoleon

Music

David Nelson

Apprentice

Donnell Nelson

Other

Larry Norton

Other

Brian O'kelley

Unit Manager

Peter Odabashian

Sound Editor

Eric Oden

Assistant

Rolf Pardula

Sound Mixer

John D Parran

Other

Leroi Patton

Camera Operator

Eddie Pazant

Other

Noelle Penraat

Negative Cutting

Dennis Peterson

Generator Operator

Dale Pierce-johnson

Production Coordinator

Lonnie Plaxico

Music

Benjamin Powell

Other

Mikki Powell

Casting Associate

Seldon Powell

Music

Frank Prinzi

Camera Operator

Robi Reed-humes

Casting

Rufus Reid

Music

Maxine Roach

Music

Larry Robertson

Lighting

Janis Robinson

Other

Stacy Robinson

Other

Joe Rodman

Production Assistant

Mindy Rodman

Script Supervisor

Bruce Rogers

Other

Benjamin Ross

Other

Monty Ross

Coproducer

Kevin Russell

Production Assistant

Leander Sales

Sound Editor

Otis Sallid

Choreographer

Film Details

Also Known As
Aulas turbulentas
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Morehouse, Georgia, USA; Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Brooklyn, New York, USA; Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Morris Brown College, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 12, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 28, 1988

Released in United States 1988

Released in United States October 1988

Released in United States March 1999

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.

Shown at International Flanders Film Festival in Ghent, Belgium October 12-22, 1988.

Tisha Campbell replaced Vanessa Williams, who withdrew from the cast. The film is in memory of Kwame Olantunji, Willi Smith, Harold Vick, and Dr Wendall P Whalum.

Completed shooting May 1987.

Began shooting March 9, 1987.

Released in United States Winter February 12, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 28, 1988

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.)

Released in United States March 1999 (Shown in Los Angeles (American Cinematheque) as part of program "Out in the Streets: The Films of Spike Lee" March 15-20, 1999.)

Released in United States October 1988 (Shown at International Flanders Film Festival in Ghent, Belgium October 12-22, 1988.)