That Way with Women


1h 24m 1947
That Way with Women

Brief Synopsis

An elderly millionaire makes a hobby of playing cupid.

Photos & Videos

That Way With Women - Movie Posters

Film Details

Also Known As
A Very Rich Man
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Mar 29, 1947
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Feb 1947
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Idle Hands" by Earl Derr Biggers in The Saturday Evening Post (11 Jun 1921).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Former automobile executive James P. Alden has retired to Pasadena with his wife Minerva and daughter Marcia, but is bored by his new inactive life. During a tea party at the Alden house, Marcia meets Greg Wilson, who has come with a friend. Marcia, who is engaged to handsome Carter Andrews, tries to chat with Greg, but he insults her and her friends, whom he sees as superficial rich people, and leaves the party in a huff. Alden, who is on a restricted diet for health reasons, has hired Herman Brinker, a former employee, to secretly cook for him the elegant meals that he enjoys. One day, Alden sees an advertisement for a service station and decides to buy it as a secret hobby. The current owner tells him that she has already sold a half interest to a mechanic, who turns out to be Greg. Alden takes an immediate liking to Greg, and pretending to be Herman, goes into partnership with him. To get enough money to fix up the station, Alden pretends to borrow the money from his former employer--himself. As soon as the station becomes successful, however, Alden and Greg are approached by racketeers who demand protection money. Unknown to Alden, Carter is another racketeer, whose assignment is to marry Marcia. Alden explains his daily absences from home by claiming to visit a former employee, so when a curious Marcia finds one of the station's cards in her father's pocket, she investigates. Although she does not find Alden at the station, she ends by accepting an invitation from Greg, who promises to show her "how ordinary people live." Their date at a baseball game is not a success, but Greg and Marcia are attracted to each other, although neither will admit it. In order to force Alden and Greg to pay protection money, the racketeers, meanwhile, frame them by dumping a load of stolen tires at the station. After Alden and Greg are arrested, Alden reveals his true identity. Greg does not believe him, however, and neither do the police. Greg then calls Marcia, who refuses to help at first. Later, she reconsiders but, not knowing that Greg's partner is really her father, pays only Greg's bail. Greg then tries to find "Herman's" family, and discovers the real identity of his partner. When Marcia learns that her father is missing, she convinces Herman to reveal Alden's whereabouts and returns to the jail to get him released. Alden then asks Marcia to drive Greg to their house, and by the time they arrive, the two have fallen in love. When Carter arrives at the Aldens' to elope with Marcia, Greg recognizes him as one of the racketeers and beats him up. With all the confusion finally cleared up, Marcia and Greg plan their marriage, and Alden agrees to return to Detroit to restore his failing auto company.

Photo Collections

That Way With Women - Movie Posters
That Way With Women - Movie Posters

Film Details

Also Known As
A Very Rich Man
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Mar 29, 1947
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Feb 1947
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Idle Hands" by Earl Derr Biggers in The Saturday Evening Post (11 Jun 1921).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

That Way With Women - That Way With Women


Searching for a vehicle to showcase what New York Times critic Bosley Crowther called "their latest bobby-sox favorite," Dane Clark, Warner Brothers dusted off a creaky old vehicle starring George Arliss, the venerable British actor and Academy Award winner (Disraeli, 1929), who couldn't have been less like the pugnacious, Brooklyn-born Clark. In actual fact, Arliss's role was taken by popular character actor Sydney Greenstreet, but it was Clark who was listed as star at the head of the credits.

That Way with Women was actually a remake of two Arliss pictures. Charlie Chan creator Earl Derr Biggers's Saturday Evening Post story "Idle Hands" was first made into the silent film The Ruling Passion (1922), in which Arliss played a self-made millionaire ordered to rest by his doctor. He soon grows bored and opens a garage on the sly so he can work pleasurably as a simple mechanic. By the early days of sound, the 63-year-old Arliss had become an unlikely star at Warner Brothers, and the studio trotted out the story again (adding dialogue by Booth Tarkington) with Arliss once more in the lead (and James Cagney in a small supporting part) in The Millionaire (1931).

In this version, Greenstreet is the millionaire James Alden, who takes on the identity of the family gardener in order to sneak off to a grease monkey job at the corner gas station run by Greg Wilson (Clark). Where this one veers from its predecessor is in forefronting a youthful--and contentious--love story between Clark's working-class lug and Greenstreet's society daughter. In his review, Crowther noted that making the romance the picture's dominant element was a big mistake, but apparently Clark's bobby-soxers following didn't mind.

Crowther may have overstated Clark's teen idol status. Already 35 when he made this film, the actor with the "Joe Average" appeal had been around for a while. He started on Broadway in the mid-1930s in several noteworthy plays before making his film debut in 1940, acting for a few years under his real name, Bernard Zanville. His breakthrough (and first role as "Dane Clark") came in the Humphrey Bogart film Action in the North Atlantic (1943). Just prior to That Way with Women, he had good roles in Pride of the Marines (1945) with John Garfield and A Stolen Life (1946) with Bette Davis.

Greenstreet, who made his memorable film debut at the age of 62 in The Maltese Falcon (1941), was nearing the end of his career by 1947, although he was enough in demand to make seven more films in the next two years before retiring after Malaya (1949).

Clark's love interest here is played by Martha Vickers, a rather pouty-looking beauty and second stringer at Warners whose previous roles included the wanton sister of Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep (1946). A couple of years after this, she would become wife number three (of eight) of Mickey Rooney. She and Rooney had a son, Teddy, who acted in a handful of movies and TV shows between 1958 and 1965. In 1960, ten-year-old Teddy Rooney and mom Martha Vickers made a pilot for a sitcom called "Man in the House," but it was not picked up by a network. She stopped acting that year and died of cancer in 1971 at the age of 46.

The direction of this picture was entrusted to Frederick De Cordova, better known as the longtime producer of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. This was only his third film as director. To shoot it, Warners gave him cinematographer Ted McCord, who would receive three future Academy Award nominations, including one for The Sound of Music (1965).

The music is by Frederick Hollander (aka Friedrich Hollaender), best know for his extended association with Marlene Dietrich on such films as The Blue Angel (1930), Destry Rides Again (1939), and A Foreign Affair (1948).

Director: Frederick De Cordova
Producer: Charles Hoffman
Screenplay: Leo Townsend, additional dialogue by Francis Swann, based on the story "Idle Hands" by Earl Derr Biggers
Cinematography: Ted McCord
Editing: Folmar Blangsted
Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter
Original Music: Frederick Hollander
Cast: Dane Clark (Greg Wilson), Martha Vickers (Marcia Alden), Sydney Greenstreet (James P. Alden), Alan Hale (Herman Brinker), Craig Stevens (Carter Andrews)

By Rob Nixon
That Way With Women  - That Way With Women

That Way With Women - That Way With Women

Searching for a vehicle to showcase what New York Times critic Bosley Crowther called "their latest bobby-sox favorite," Dane Clark, Warner Brothers dusted off a creaky old vehicle starring George Arliss, the venerable British actor and Academy Award winner (Disraeli, 1929), who couldn't have been less like the pugnacious, Brooklyn-born Clark. In actual fact, Arliss's role was taken by popular character actor Sydney Greenstreet, but it was Clark who was listed as star at the head of the credits. That Way with Women was actually a remake of two Arliss pictures. Charlie Chan creator Earl Derr Biggers's Saturday Evening Post story "Idle Hands" was first made into the silent film The Ruling Passion (1922), in which Arliss played a self-made millionaire ordered to rest by his doctor. He soon grows bored and opens a garage on the sly so he can work pleasurably as a simple mechanic. By the early days of sound, the 63-year-old Arliss had become an unlikely star at Warner Brothers, and the studio trotted out the story again (adding dialogue by Booth Tarkington) with Arliss once more in the lead (and James Cagney in a small supporting part) in The Millionaire (1931). In this version, Greenstreet is the millionaire James Alden, who takes on the identity of the family gardener in order to sneak off to a grease monkey job at the corner gas station run by Greg Wilson (Clark). Where this one veers from its predecessor is in forefronting a youthful--and contentious--love story between Clark's working-class lug and Greenstreet's society daughter. In his review, Crowther noted that making the romance the picture's dominant element was a big mistake, but apparently Clark's bobby-soxers following didn't mind. Crowther may have overstated Clark's teen idol status. Already 35 when he made this film, the actor with the "Joe Average" appeal had been around for a while. He started on Broadway in the mid-1930s in several noteworthy plays before making his film debut in 1940, acting for a few years under his real name, Bernard Zanville. His breakthrough (and first role as "Dane Clark") came in the Humphrey Bogart film Action in the North Atlantic (1943). Just prior to That Way with Women, he had good roles in Pride of the Marines (1945) with John Garfield and A Stolen Life (1946) with Bette Davis. Greenstreet, who made his memorable film debut at the age of 62 in The Maltese Falcon (1941), was nearing the end of his career by 1947, although he was enough in demand to make seven more films in the next two years before retiring after Malaya (1949). Clark's love interest here is played by Martha Vickers, a rather pouty-looking beauty and second stringer at Warners whose previous roles included the wanton sister of Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep (1946). A couple of years after this, she would become wife number three (of eight) of Mickey Rooney. She and Rooney had a son, Teddy, who acted in a handful of movies and TV shows between 1958 and 1965. In 1960, ten-year-old Teddy Rooney and mom Martha Vickers made a pilot for a sitcom called "Man in the House," but it was not picked up by a network. She stopped acting that year and died of cancer in 1971 at the age of 46. The direction of this picture was entrusted to Frederick De Cordova, better known as the longtime producer of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. This was only his third film as director. To shoot it, Warners gave him cinematographer Ted McCord, who would receive three future Academy Award nominations, including one for The Sound of Music (1965). The music is by Frederick Hollander (aka Friedrich Hollaender), best know for his extended association with Marlene Dietrich on such films as The Blue Angel (1930), Destry Rides Again (1939), and A Foreign Affair (1948). Director: Frederick De Cordova Producer: Charles Hoffman Screenplay: Leo Townsend, additional dialogue by Francis Swann, based on the story "Idle Hands" by Earl Derr Biggers Cinematography: Ted McCord Editing: Folmar Blangsted Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter Original Music: Frederick Hollander Cast: Dane Clark (Greg Wilson), Martha Vickers (Marcia Alden), Sydney Greenstreet (James P. Alden), Alan Hale (Herman Brinker), Craig Stevens (Carter Andrews) By Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's working title was A Very Rich Man. Earl Derr Biggers' story was also the basis for the 1922 United Artist film The Ruling Passion, directed by Harmon Weight and starring George Arliss (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4731). In 1931, Arliss starred in a second version of the story entitled The Millionaire. That film was directed by John Adolfi (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.2883).