Straight Talk


1h 30m 1992

Brief Synopsis

The story of a woman who leaves her small town for the city in search of fame and becomes a radio call-in therapist.

Film Details

Also Known As
Ärligt talat
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Scott R Thomson
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

The story of a woman who leaves her small town for the city in search of fame and becomes a radio call-in therapist.

Crew

Mary-gail Artz

Casting

Ross F Aseron

Art Department Coordinator

Rick Ash

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Carolyn Schraut Barczak

Wardrobe Supervisor

Carol Baum

Executive Producer

Ben Beaird

Key Grip

Irving Berlin

Song

Fred Berner

Producer

Ken Blackwell

Assistant Editor

Alphonse Blumenthal

Best Boy

Craig Bolotin

Screenplay

Craig Bolotin

From Story

Craig Bolotin

Story By

Brenda Bos

Assistant

Tim Boyle

Music

Tristan Brighty

Apprentice Editor

Wendy Brokaw

Production Assistant

Zane Bruce

Foley Artist

Tom Busch

Assistant Director

Robert Cable

Production Assistant

Frank P Calzavara

Stunts

David E Campbell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Julie Chandler

Script Supervisor

Robert Chartoff

Producer

Robert Chase

Costume Supervisor

Guy Clayton

Special Effects Coordinator

Barbara Cohen

Casting

Eugene Crededio

Lighting Technician

Hallie D'amore

Makeup Artist

Deborah Lamia Denevar

Makeup

Demetra Diamantopoulos

Location Manager

Brad Fiedel

Original Score

James Fierro

Stunts

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Cindy Fret

Assistant Sound Editor

Sandy Gallin

Executive Producer

Miranda Garrison

Choreographer

Gina Gascino

Location Manager

Eric Gotthelf

Foley Mixer

Dale Grahn

Color Timer

Sandra Grand

Casting Associate

Barbara Gutman

Production Accountant

Alan Haft

Assistant

David Lee Hagberg

Sound Editor

Carol Hall

Consultant

Cliff Hallerud

Foreman

Harold Hauss

Helicopter Pilot

Gary Hecker

Foley Mixer

Alec Hirschfeld

Camera Operator

Bill Hogan

Transportation Captain

James F Hogan

Transportation Coordinator

Karen Lee Holley

Property Master

John Hudecek

Gaffer

Kalina Ivanov

Visual Effects

Fred Judkins

Sound Editor

Sharon Kaczala

Other

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Joseph P Kane

Unit Production Manager

Kevin Kane

Production Assistant

Mark Kiracofe

Assistant

Barbara Anne Klein

Stunts

Jonathan Klein

Adr Editor

James J Klekowski

Assistant Location Manager

Nicholas Vincent Korda

Adr Editor

John Kretchmer

Assistant Director

Greg Ladanyi

Song

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Rick Lefevour

Stunt Coordinator

Morgan Michael Lewis

Key Grip

Stacey Logan

Stunts

Patricia D Lydon

Location Manager

Daniel Maldonado

Stunts

Henri Marie-caillot

Hair Stylist

Joe Marquette

Camera Operator

James Matheny

Sound Editor

Bradley T Matthys

Dolly Grip

Mark E Matthys

Dolly Grip

Dan May

Set Decorator

Amie Frances Mccarthy-winn

Assistant Property Master

William M. Mcconnell

Assistant Camera Operator

Linda Melazzo

Makeup

Glenn Miller

Song Performer

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

James Moriana

Foley Artist

Patrick Paul Mullane

Assistant Sound Editor

Mark Niedelson

Production Assistant

James Oakes

Grip

Judy Ogle

Assistant

Tyler Osman

Construction Coordinator

Bill Owens

Song

J L Parker

Transportation Coordinator

Dolly Parton

Song

Dolly Parton

Song Performer

Michael T Perry

Art Director

Michael Phillips

Production Assistant

Michael Phillips

Production Assistant

Larry Pitman

Sound Dubbing

Normann Pokorny

Assistant Director

Judy Pritchard

Production Coordinator

Mark Phillip Raff

Production Assistant

Patricia Resnick

Screenplay

Jeff Richman

Production Assistant

Cheryl Riddle

Hair Stylist

John L Roman

Assistant Director

Allan K Rosen

Music Editor

Zvi Howard Rosenman

Executive Producer

J Bradford Ruby

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert E Ryan

Boom Operator

Carla Kitty Sacks

Assistant

Don Schalk

Apprentice

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

Tim Sheffer

Camera Assistant

Donna Shreve

Other

Don Smetzer

Photography

Mary Ruth Smith

Sound Editor

Peter Sova

Director Of Photography

Peter Sova

Dp/Cinematographer

Michael D Starcevich

Production Assistant

Shirlee Strahm

Costumes

Peter Michael Sullivan

Sound Editor

Debra L Tennant

Apprentice

Alan Thatcher

Dp/Cinematographer

Alan Thatcher

Director Of Photography

Scott R Thomson

Cable Operator

Jodie Tillen

Costume Designer

Renee Tondelli

Adr Editor

Jeffrey Townsend

Production Designer

Mark A Tracy

Assistant Sound Editor

Michael Tronick

Editor

Frank Vivacqua

Production Assistant

Patricia Von Arx

Music

John A Waldo

Assistant Camera Operator

Donald H Walker

Accounting Assistant

Maura Walsh

Apprentice

Dara Lauren Waxman

On-Set Dresser

Lawrence Welk

Song Performer

Suzan Wexler

Set Designer

Kay H Whipple

Stunts

Jeffrey Wilhoit

Foley Artist

Glenn Williams

Sound Mixer

Laurel Wolowic

Production Assistant

Dean A. Zupancic

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
Ärligt talat
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Scott R Thomson
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video October 7, 1992

Released in United States Spring April 3, 1992

Began shooting July 29, 1991.

Completed shooting October 31, 1991.

Released in United States Spring April 3, 1992

Released in United States on Video October 7, 1992