Arachnophobia


1h 43m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A doctor with a deathly fear of spiders moves to a small town invaded by deadly versions of the same.

Film Details

Also Known As
Arachnophobie, Aracnofobia, Imse vimse spindel
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Randy Mcdonald
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Cambria, California, USA; Venezuela; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Synopsis

Chaos results when an American scientist imports a rare African spider to a small Southwestern town.

Crew

Jane Alden

Adr

Connie Angland

Animatronics

Oscar Gamez Arevalo

Other

Larry Ashmore

Original Music

Rebecca Baehler

Camera

Edward Bannon

Sound Effects

Craig Barron

Visual Effects

Dave Bartholomew

Electrician

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Mixer

Tiffany Ann Battersby

Craft Service

Carol Bauman

Animatronics

Bill Beasley

Unit Production Manager

Bill Beasley

Associate Producer

Tony Bennett

Song Performer

Jon Berg

Animatronics

R Michael Bisetti

Special Effects Assistant

James D. Bissell

Production Designer

Ellen Blain

Adr

Steve Borne

Sound Editor

Judith Bouley

Casting

Max Brehme

On-Set Dresser

Bart Brown

Production Assistant

Hans Brudtke

Song

Abraham Bucce

Construction

Julio Bucce

Property Master Assistant

Jimmy Buffett

Song

Jimmy Buffett

Song Performer

Christopher Burian-mohr

Art Director

Randy Burke

Transportation Captain

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Dwight Campbell

Gaffer

Franklin Campos

Electrician

Jimmy Caprillo

Other

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Jackie J Carr

Set Decorator

Michael Carrillo

On-Set Dresser

Paul Castillo

Property Master Assistant

Catherine Cavadini

Adr

Jesse Chavez

Dolly Grip

Alan Cody

Assistant Editor

Richmond G Cogswell

Video Assist/Playback

Bruce Cohen

Assistant Director

Martin Cohen

Post-Production Supervisor

Paul Cohen

Foreman

Clark Coleman

Stunts

John Connell

Generator Operator

Robert Cort

Co-Executive Producer

George C Cory

Song

Patrick Crane

Assistant Editor

Douglass Cross

Song

Mark Crosthwaite

Electrician

David D'ovidio

Assistant Director

Guy Dagul

Original Music

Tanya Sharp David

Adr Mixer

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Luisa Delaville

Assistant Director

Ernie Depew

Construction Coordinator

Maria Devane

Accounting Assistant

Bryan Dewe

Animatronics

Nicholas Diblasi

Production Manager

John Drouillard

Animatronics

Renee Dupont

Assistant

Stephan Dupuis

Animatronics

Judi Durand

Adr

Carolyn L. Elias

Hair

Mary Erstad

Sound Effects

Ann Eysenring

Production Assistant

Edward C Eyth

Visual Effects

Gus Feederle

Property Master Assistant

Mike Fenton

Casting

Ted Field

Co-Executive Producer

Louis S Fleming

Property Master

Richard Foreman

Photography

Bruce Foster

Sound Editor

Ian Fox

Assistant Camera Operator

Richard Friedman

Adr Editor

Joel Friesch

Animatronics

Maria Eugenia Gil

Production Coordinator

Jack P Glenn

Grip

William Goldenberg

Assistant Editor

Eric J. Goldstein

Camera Operator

Allison Gordon

Casting Associate

Henry Guerrero

Camera Assistant

Jorge Gutierrez

Grip

Jill Hall

Art Assistant

Mark Harden

Animal Trainer

Paul Hargrave

Location Manager

Barbara Harris

Adr

Barbara Harris

Casting

Bill Hartman

Sound Editor

Eero Hautanen

Props

Vince Heileson

Production Accountant

Jurgen Heimann

Other

Doris Hess

Adr

Sara Hickman

Song Performer

Don C Hildebrand

Helicopter Pilot

John Hock

Stunts

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Bobby Huber

Key Grip

David J Hudson

Sound

Guy Hudson

Animatronics

Paul Hulme

Music

Darrell Huntsman

Other

James Hyneman

Animatronics

Dave Ice

Sound Editor

James Isaac

Other

Paul Iski

Grip

Conrad Itchener

Animatronics

Ronald Jackson

Boom Operator

Don Jakoby

Screenplay

Don Jakoby

From Story

Don Jakoby

Story By

Don Jakoby

Coproducer

Sandy Jelamby

Makeup

Sandy Jelamby

Hair

Maggie Jensen

Animatronics

Michael Jobe

Animatronics

Christie Johnston

Production Coordinator

Trevor Jones

Music

Ronald Judkins

Sound Mixer

Donald Kaeding

On-Set Dresser

Michael Kahn

Editor

Michael Kelem

Generator Operator

Thomas F. Kelly

Song

Kathleen Kennedy

Producer

James Kent

Animatronics

Gary F Kieldrup

Property Master Assistant

R. J. Kizer

Adr Editor

Martin A Kline

Visual Effects

Cathy Konrad

Assistant

Rocky Krakoff

Adr

Chuck Kristensen

Consultant

Jim Kundig

Other

Steven R. Kutcher

Other

Jimmy Leavens

Dolly Grip

Kelly Lepkowsky

Animatronics

Victoria Lewis

Animatronics

Jimmy Ling

Sound Editor

Alan Lipney

Animatronics

Michael Litteken

Foreman

Paul A Litteken

Foreman

Rolando Loewenstein

Production Supervisor

Daniel J Lombardo

Production Assistant

Natalio Lorenzo

Camera Assistant

David Luckenbach

Assistant Camera Operator

Michelle Lyman

Animatronics

Christina Macgregor

Adr

Dan Marrow

Transportation Coordinator

Frank Marshall

Executive Producer

Martika

Song

Russell Martin

Production Assistant

Elaine Maser

Costumes

Valorie Massalas

Casting

Henry Mayer

Song

Edward T. Mcavoy

Assistant Art Director

Roxanne Mccarthy

Sound Editor

Tom Mccarthy

Sound Editor

Walter Mccormick

Projectionist

James L Mccoy

Makeup

Randy Mcdonald

Cable Operator

Denise Mcgrath

Accounting Assistant

Ryan Mcwhorter

Adr

Michael John Meehan

Location Manager

Johnny Mercer

Song

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

Pat Metheny

Song Performer

Pat Metheny

Song

Lucy Michael

Other

Carolina Montenegro

Other

Clayburn Moore

Animatronics

Ralph Nelson

Photography

Jay Oliver

Song

Gregg Olsson

Animatronics

Jennifer Parsons

Costume Designer

Suzanne Lee Peck

Art Department Coordinator

Tania Perez

Wardrobe Supervisor

Arnold Peterson

Consultant

Julie Pitkanen

Script Supervisor

Terry Porter

Sound

Dave Powell

Costumes

David Quashnick

Makeup

Bonne Radford

Production Associate

David Randolph

Adr

John Richards

Music

John Robotham

Stunts

Johnny Rodriguez

Electrician

Andy Ryan

Electrician

Mikael Salomon

Dp/Cinematographer

Mikael Salomon

Other

Mikael Salomon

Director Of Photography

Alison Savitch

Effects Coordinator

James D. Schwalm

Special Effects Assistant

Gary Schwartz

Adr

La Gloria Scott

Adr

Victoria Seale

Music Coordinator

Steve Sheridan

Color Timer

Francisco Silva

Dolly Grip

Lincoln Simonds

Stunts

Frank Sinatra

Song Performer

John J Slatsky

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Arachnophobie, Aracnofobia, Imse vimse spindel
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Randy Mcdonald
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Cambria, California, USA; Venezuela; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Articles

Arachnophobia


The perennial big joke in Hollywood is that everybody, no matter how successful they are at their particular craft, wants to direct. Sometimes people hop into the fray too soon, without considering whether they have anything worthwhile to say. Others, however, bypass the chance to make themselves look foolish by cranking out a movie that's impossible to view as anything more than a lark. That way, if they fall flat on their face, they can pretend it was no big deal. And if they happen to score big with audiences, everyone in the industry will applaud their self-effacing, money-minting ways.

In 1990, Frank Marshall, who had long produced movies for some guy named Steven Spielberg, managed that last trick quite successfully. Arachnophobia (1990), Marshall's directorial debut, is a horror picture about killer spiders that's part funny, part frightening, and wall-to-wall icky. It's so infectiously goofy, you forgive any first-timer missteps.

Arachnophobia, in case you don't know, is a psychological term meaning "an abnormal fear of spiders." But you won't think there's anything abnormal about it once Marshall starts tossing scores of creepy-crawlies at you. Prepare yourself if you're having trouble at the outset: the spiders only get more frightening as the movie progresses!

After a lengthy prologue during which an entomologist (Julian Sands) manages to accidentally transfer a dangerous type of spider (in reality a harmless, but unbelievably ferocious-looking, Delena) to the U.S. from South America, we meet Dr. Ross Jennings (Jeff Daniels). Jennings is a mild-mannered physician who's taken his family out of the big city and re-settled in what he thinks is a more family-friendly environment. Soon Jennings gets entangled in a disturbing mystery when blood-drained corpses start popping up around town.

The good doctor, who ­- unfortunately for him, and fortunately for the audience -- suffers from acute arachnophobia, will soon discover that those menacing South American spiders are behind the deaths. And they get bigger when they kill. Even a comically gun-slinging exterminator (John Goodman) can't stop the onslaught of spider nastiness, which eventually reaches a level that's guaranteed to freak out even the sturdiest viewer.

By the time he directed Arachnophobia, Marshall had already had a hand in producing (usually with his wife and business partner, Kathleen Kennedy) such films as Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Poltergeist (1982), Gremlins (1984), The Goonies (1985), Back to the Future (1985), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), and all the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Back to the Future sequels. He certainly could have rested on his producers' laurels, but he took the leap and became a bankable director.

Somewhat unexpectedly, given the zeal with which he pulls off a standard genre entry, Marshall's follow-up to Arachnophobia was Alive (1993), a critically lauded tale of plane-crash survival that featured disturbing scenes of do-or-die cannibalism. Marshall's sense of ambition certainly hasn't waned since then. His next project is an adventure picture set in the far reaches of Antarctica. It's unclear at this point if squeamish viewers will have anything to worry about with that one, but you never know. Someone might eat a huge spider.

Director: Frank Marshall
Producers: Kathleen Kennedy and Richard Vane
Executive Producer: Steven Spielberg
Screenplay: Don Jakoby, Wesley Strick (based on the story by Don Jakoby and Al Williams)
Cinematography: Mikael Salomon
Editing: Michael Kahn
Music: Trevor Jones Production Design: James Bissell
Art Design: Christopher Burian-Mohr
Special Effects: Matt Sweeney and Chris Walas
Set Design: Carl J. Stensel
Costume Design: Jennifer L. Parsons
Makeup: James L. McCoy and David Quashnick
Technical Advisers: Steven R. Kutcher, Arnold Peterson, and Chuck Christensen
Cast: Jeff Daniels (Dr. Ross Jennings), Harley Jane Kozak (Molly Jennings), John Goodman (Delbert McClintock), Julian Sands (Dr. James Atherton), Stuart Pankin (Sheriff Parsons), Brian McNamara (Chris Collins), Mark L. Taylor (Jerry Manley), Henry Jones (Dr. Sam Metcalf), Peter Jason (Henry Beechwood), James Handy (Milton Briggs).
C-103m. Letterboxed.

by Paul Tatara

Arachnophobia

Arachnophobia

The perennial big joke in Hollywood is that everybody, no matter how successful they are at their particular craft, wants to direct. Sometimes people hop into the fray too soon, without considering whether they have anything worthwhile to say. Others, however, bypass the chance to make themselves look foolish by cranking out a movie that's impossible to view as anything more than a lark. That way, if they fall flat on their face, they can pretend it was no big deal. And if they happen to score big with audiences, everyone in the industry will applaud their self-effacing, money-minting ways. In 1990, Frank Marshall, who had long produced movies for some guy named Steven Spielberg, managed that last trick quite successfully. Arachnophobia (1990), Marshall's directorial debut, is a horror picture about killer spiders that's part funny, part frightening, and wall-to-wall icky. It's so infectiously goofy, you forgive any first-timer missteps. Arachnophobia, in case you don't know, is a psychological term meaning "an abnormal fear of spiders." But you won't think there's anything abnormal about it once Marshall starts tossing scores of creepy-crawlies at you. Prepare yourself if you're having trouble at the outset: the spiders only get more frightening as the movie progresses! After a lengthy prologue during which an entomologist (Julian Sands) manages to accidentally transfer a dangerous type of spider (in reality a harmless, but unbelievably ferocious-looking, Delena) to the U.S. from South America, we meet Dr. Ross Jennings (Jeff Daniels). Jennings is a mild-mannered physician who's taken his family out of the big city and re-settled in what he thinks is a more family-friendly environment. Soon Jennings gets entangled in a disturbing mystery when blood-drained corpses start popping up around town. The good doctor, who ­- unfortunately for him, and fortunately for the audience -- suffers from acute arachnophobia, will soon discover that those menacing South American spiders are behind the deaths. And they get bigger when they kill. Even a comically gun-slinging exterminator (John Goodman) can't stop the onslaught of spider nastiness, which eventually reaches a level that's guaranteed to freak out even the sturdiest viewer. By the time he directed Arachnophobia, Marshall had already had a hand in producing (usually with his wife and business partner, Kathleen Kennedy) such films as Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Poltergeist (1982), Gremlins (1984), The Goonies (1985), Back to the Future (1985), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), and all the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Back to the Future sequels. He certainly could have rested on his producers' laurels, but he took the leap and became a bankable director. Somewhat unexpectedly, given the zeal with which he pulls off a standard genre entry, Marshall's follow-up to Arachnophobia was Alive (1993), a critically lauded tale of plane-crash survival that featured disturbing scenes of do-or-die cannibalism. Marshall's sense of ambition certainly hasn't waned since then. His next project is an adventure picture set in the far reaches of Antarctica. It's unclear at this point if squeamish viewers will have anything to worry about with that one, but you never know. Someone might eat a huge spider. Director: Frank Marshall Producers: Kathleen Kennedy and Richard Vane Executive Producer: Steven Spielberg Screenplay: Don Jakoby, Wesley Strick (based on the story by Don Jakoby and Al Williams) Cinematography: Mikael Salomon Editing: Michael Kahn Music: Trevor Jones Production Design: James Bissell Art Design: Christopher Burian-Mohr Special Effects: Matt Sweeney and Chris Walas Set Design: Carl J. Stensel Costume Design: Jennifer L. Parsons Makeup: James L. McCoy and David Quashnick Technical Advisers: Steven R. Kutcher, Arnold Peterson, and Chuck Christensen Cast: Jeff Daniels (Dr. Ross Jennings), Harley Jane Kozak (Molly Jennings), John Goodman (Delbert McClintock), Julian Sands (Dr. James Atherton), Stuart Pankin (Sheriff Parsons), Brian McNamara (Chris Collins), Mark L. Taylor (Jerry Manley), Henry Jones (Dr. Sam Metcalf), Peter Jason (Henry Beechwood), James Handy (Milton Briggs). C-103m. Letterboxed. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 18, 1990

Released in United States on Video March 6, 1991

Released in United States January 1991

Shown at Avoriaz Festival of Fantasy Film, France January 12-20, 1991.

Directorial debut for producer Frank Marshall.

Completed shooting April 11, 1990.

Began shooting December 4, 1989.

Released in United States January 1991 (Shown at Avoriaz Festival of Fantasy Film, France January 12-20, 1991.)

Released in United States Summer July 18, 1990

Released in United States on Video March 6, 1991