Fletch Lives


1h 35m 1989

Brief Synopsis

Fletch, the investigative journalist, goes to Louisiana for a vacation and finds himself involved in some local intrigue.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fletch 2, Fletch II, Fletch är tillbaka
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Mystery
Thriller
Sequel
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Agalsoff
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Universal City Studios, Los Angeles, California, USA; Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, USA; Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria, New York, USA; New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

Fletch, the investigative journalist, goes to Louisiana for a vacation and finds himself involved in some local intrigue.

Crew

Joshua Abeles

Production Assistant

Tony Adler

Assistant Director

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

John Agalsoff

Cable Operator

Susan Agnoff

Accounting Assistant

Jim Alexander

Sound

Rick Alexander

Sound

Barbara Amato

Script Supervisor

Kokayi Ampah

Location Manager

Audie Aragon

Dolly Grip

Dick Austin

Transportation Captain

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Sandina Bailo-lape

Sound Editor

Wayne Baker

Visual Effects

Matilde Balera

Accountant

Nicole Barnum

Art Department Coordinator

Michael Bedard

Sound

Karen Bellamy

Costumes

Tom Bellfort

Adr Editor

Dennis Benatar

Location Manager

John Bensberg

Craft Service

Cindy Berenson

Other

John V Bernardi

Construction

Lynette Bernay

Assistant

Nicholas Bernstein

Location Assistant

Cameron Birnie

Art Director

Melissa Dietz Bloom

Sound Editor

Jimmie Bly

Art Director

Brent Boates

Visual Effects

Susan Bode

Set Decorator

Bruce Bodner

Executive Producer

Gloria S Borders

Sound Editor

Blair Boswel

Production Assistant

Merideth Boswell

Art Department

Steve Boyd

Transportation Coordinator

Carol Brandi

Sound Editor

Conrad F Brink

Special Effects

Brian P Brophy

On-Set Dresser

Norman Buck

Key Grip

Cheryl Burton

Assistant

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Leonidas Capetanos

Screenplay

Philip Caplan

Camera Operator

Michael Caracciolo

Assistant Camera Operator

Richard Castleman

Casting

Henry Charleston

Electrician

Ken Chase

Makeup

Stephen Clark

Grip

Thomas F Costich

Costumes

Peter Craig

Production Assistant

Fernando Cubillas

Production Assistant

Tanya Sharp David

Adr Mixer

Jonathan Decamp

Production Assistant

Joseph Dehn

Costumes

Ruth Doering

Costumes

Peter Douglas

Producer

Liz Dubelman

Assistant Camera Operator

Stanley Dural

Song

Steve Ellsworth

Costumes

Dana Embree

Wardrobe Assistant

Michael Fabiano

Grip

Harold Faltermeyer

Music

Diamond Farnsworth

Stunts

Joel Fein

Sound

Gary Fettis

Set Decorator

Scott R. Fisher

Special Effects

Judie Fixler

Casting Associate

Glenn Forbes

Props

Walt Fraser

Assistant Camera

Clare Freeman

Sound Editor

Steve Gage

Dolly Grip

Roz Galzer

Assistant

Dennis Garper

Grip

Peter Garzero

Other

Gilbert Gertsen

Carpenter

James Giblin

Other

Earl Gilbert

Gaffer

Steve Gilbert

Electrician

Robert Good

On-Set Dresser

W Steven Graham

Art Director

Richard Graves

Assistant Director

Michael Green

Assistant Camera Operator

Richard E Greene

Other

Romaine Greene

Hair

Alan Greisman

Producer

Jo Grossman

Accountant

Pat Grosswendt

Electrician

Rainer Gruetzmacher

Foreman

Rick Gunter

Dp/Cinematographer

Rick Gunter

Director Of Photography

Rhio Haessig

Best Boy

Gregory G. Hale

Production Assistant

William G Hall

Foreman

Thomas E Halligan

Grip

Alan Harding

Visual Effects

Barbara Harris

Casting

Mitchell A Harris

Assistant Editor

Richard A Harris

Editor

Richard A Harris

Associate Producer

Kerry Hayes

Photography

Stephen Hendrickson

Consultant

Sue Hessel

Casting Consultant

Gary H Hester

Foreman

Howard R Hester

Construction Coordinator

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

Karen D Higgins

Construction

Ron High

Assistant Camera Operator

Kathy Hirsch

Production Assistant

Ronald A Jacobs

Sound Editor

Amy Jennings

Accountant

James E. Johnson

Transportation Captain

Lionel A Johnson

Transportation Co-Captain

Michael Johnson

Production Assistant

Anna Hill Johnstone

Costume Designer

Horace B Jordan

Assistant Camera Operator

Enid L Kantor

Production Coordinator

Mitchell Kaplan

Assistant

Jane Kass

Assistant Editor

Angela Kaye

Assistant

Richard Kratina

Camera Operator

Neil Krepla

Visual Effects

Ted Kurdyla

Unit Production Manager

Wang Lab

Assistant

Margaret Labry

Production Assistant

Alan Landaker

Video

Hal Landaker

Video

Angie Lane

Casting Associate

Bonney Langfitt

Wardrobe Assistant

Norman Langley

Camera Operator

Robert Larson

Executive Producer

Robert Larson

Production Manager

Adena Lazan

Production Assistant

Les Lazarowitz

Sound

Daniel Leahy

Sound

John Leone

Foreman

Robert B Lindsay

Foreman

William Loger

Costume Supervisor

Elaine Luger

Assistant

Joshua Malina

Production Assistant

James Malone

Best Boy

Daniel Marano

Production Assistant

Elliot Marks

Photography

Jim Marquette

Assistant Camera Operator

Louis Marquis

Other

Pat Marshall

Rigging Gaffer

Penney May

Apprentice

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup

Richard Mazzotti

Other

Buddy Mcbride

Electrician

Robert M Mcclung

Production Assistant

Patricia Mcconnell

Casting Associate

Tom Mcdermott

Props

Gregory Mcdonald

Characters As Source Material

Jim Mcgrath

Dolly Grip

Patrick Mcguire

Production Assistant

Brian Mcpherson

Assistant Camera Operator

John Mcpherson

Director Of Photography

John Mcpherson

Dp/Cinematographer

Peter Merwin

Assistant Director

Tom Miller

Makeup

Michael Mills

Makeup

Bob Miyamoto

Grip

Patricia Mock

Casting

Joseph J Monzo

Transportation Captain

Robert Morey

Assistant Camera Operator

James C Motty

Production Assistant

Linda Murphy

Boom Operator

Carla Neary

Other

Rick Neff

Camera Operator

Elisa Nevel-demarest

Scenic Artist

Peter Norman

Camera Operator

Chris Norr

Camera Trainee

Julie Offer

Projectionist

Dawn A Oltamn

Sound Editor

Jimmy Otis

Location Assistant

Teresita Pajarillga

Accountant

James J. Passanante

Foreman

Paul Pav

Location Manager

Kathy Petty

Accounting Assistant

Susan Picket

Production Assistant

John S Platt

Stunts

Kaye Pownall

Hair

Billy Puzo

Scenic Artist

Jane Raab

Production Coordinator

Steve Randolph

Camera Operator

Scott Rathner

Assistant Camera Operator

Lex Rawlins

Assistant Camera Operator

Philip E Read

Construction Coordinator

C Andrew Reeder

Assistant Director

Brian Reeves

Music

Christopher Regan

Visual Effects

Gintar Repecka

Special Effects

Eric Roberts

Special Effects

John Robotham

Stunts

Paul Rylander

Props

Ray Sabo

Negative Cutting

Matthew Salvato

Location Assistant

Stephanie Samuel

Production

Paige Sartorius

Sound Editor

James Sbardellati

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Fletch 2, Fletch II, Fletch är tillbaka
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Mystery
Thriller
Sequel
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Agalsoff
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Universal City Studios, Los Angeles, California, USA; Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, USA; Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria, New York, USA; New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 17, 1989

Released in United States on Video September 14, 1989

Released in United States March 11, 1989

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 11, 1989.

Began shooting June 6, 1988.

Released in United States Spring March 17, 1989

Released in United States on Video September 14, 1989

Released in United States March 11, 1989 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 11, 1989.)