Fast Times At Ridgemont High


1h 32m 1982

Brief Synopsis

Growing up confounds a group of California teens.

Film Details

Also Known As
Fast Times, Häftigt drag i plugget, Ça chauffe au lycée Ridgemont
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Teens
Adaptation
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

Teenagers struggling with independence, sexuality, money, maturity and high school.

Crew

Janna Allen

Song

Joy Anzarouth

Assistant

Irving Azoff

Producer

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Bernard

Song

Patrick Blymyer

Gaffer

John Bonham

Song

Jan Brandow

Hair

Jackson Browne

Song Performer

Jimmy Buffett

Song Performer

Richard E Bulter

Stunts

Charlotte Caffey

Song

Bob Chase

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ed Cherney

Consultant

Debra Chiate

Assistant Editor

Angelo Corallis

Craft Service

Hugo Cortina

Gaffer

Cameron Crowe

Book As Source Material

Cameron Crowe

Screenplay

Vince Del Castillo

Transportation Captain

Bob Destocki

Music Coordinator

James Dillon

Assistant Director

Danny Elfman

Song

David Ellis

Stunts

C. O. Erickson

Unit Production Manager

C. O. Erickson

Executive Producer

Marty Ewing

Assistant Director

Rob Fahey

Song

Don Felder

Song Performer

Phil Flad

Sound

Arthur Forney

Assistant Editor

Carrie Frazier

Assistant Producer

Glenn Frey

Song

Mickey Gilbert

Stunts

Tim Gilbert

Stunts

Leora Glass

Assistant

James Glennon

Photography

James Glennon

Camera Operator

Louise Goffin

Song Performer

Frank Griffin

Makeup

Ron Grover

Photography

Sammy Hagar

Song Performer

Shannan Harrell

Wardrobe Supervisor

Greg Hawker

Song

Brian O Haynes

Assistant

Roger Heman

Sound

Don Henley

Song Performer

R Dudley Holmes

Property Master

Larry Holt

Stunts

William Jackson

Song

Eric Jenkins

Editor

Dennis Jones

Gaffer

Melvin Jones

Stunts

Danny Kortchmar

Song

Julius Leflore

Stunts

John R. Leonetti

Camera Assistant

Matthew F. Leonetti

Dp/Cinematographer

Matthew F. Leonetti

Director Of Photography

John Linder

Key Grip

Art Linson

Producer

Donna Linson

Assistant

Kenny Loggins

Song

Daniel Lomino

Art Director

Darlene Love

Song Performer

Ken Lubin

Transportation Captain

Anthony Magro

Sound Effects Editor

Gerard Mcmahon

Song Performer

John Moio

Stunts

John Moio

Stunt Coordinator

Graham Nash

Song Performer

Stevie Nicks

Song Performer

Ric Ocasek

Song

Alan Oliney

Stunts

Michael Ostin

Song

Tommy Overton

Sound

Jimmy Page

Song

Tom Petty

Song Performer

Don Phillips

Casting

Robert Plant

Song

Glenn Randall

Stunts

Patti Roberts-nelson

Assistant

Marv Ross

Song

Domingo Samudio

Song

Jeff Sandler

Sound Effects Editor

Bobby Sargent

Stunts

Marla Denise Schlom

Wardrobe Supervisor

Timothy B Schmit

Song Performer

Ben R Scott

Stunts

John-clay Scott

Stunts

Martin Seidman

Other

Albert Shapiro

Assistant Director

Rex Slinkard

Sound

Billy Squier

Song

Billy Squier

Song Performer

Roy Straigis

Song

James L Thompson

Sound

Bonnie Timmermann

Casting

Jim Troutman

Sound Effects Editor

Marion Tumen

Assistant Editor

Marion Tumen

Script Supervisor

Michael Utley

Song

Marilyn Vance-straker

Costume Designer

Chuck Velasco

Wardrobe Supervisor

Michael Vendrell

Stunts

Joe Walsh

Song

Joe Walsh

Music

Joe Walsh

Song Performer

Jim Weidman

Music Editor

Ward Welton

Other

Jane Wiedlin

Song

George Williams

Song

Paul Wittinburg

Dialogue Editor

Allan Wyatt

Stunts

Rusty Young

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Fast Times, Häftigt drag i plugget, Ça chauffe au lycée Ridgemont
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Teens
Adaptation
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole
Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Fast Times at Ridgemont High


As a genre, the teen sex comedy doesn't get a lot of respect. Still, many films of this set have earned a permanent spot on the pop culture landscape - like Porky's (1982), Risky Business (1983) and American Pie (1999). And leading the pack is 1982's Fast Times at Ridgemont High, a film that not only amused a generation and set the pace for the teen movies that followed, but a film that has, over the intervening two decades, evolved into a cult classic. Fast Times also launched the careers of practically everyone involved - from its up-and-coming stars (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Sean Penn, Judge Reinhold and Phoebe Cates) to director Amy Heckerling and most especially its talented young screenwriter Cameron Crowe.

Anyone who's seen Almost Famous (2000) already knows Cameron Crowe's backstory. The semi-autobiographical Almost Famous, written and directed by Crowe, spins the seemingly fantastic tale of a 15-year old rock journalist -- inspired by Crowe's own teen years. When he was just 16, Crowe wrote his first cover story for Rolling Stone and soon quit high school to go on the road, interviewing bands and musicians the likes of Bob Dylan and Led Zeppelin. At 22, Crowe decided to go back to high school - this time as a journalist. He spent the 1979-80 school year posing as a student at a San Diego high school. Crowe's experiences became the novel Fast Times at Ridgemont High (with names changed to protect the innocent, though Crowe claims "all the incidents are true"). Oddly, Crowe's main discovery about his classmates was how conservative they were. "They're Reagan children," he commented. "It's scary." Crowe was called on to adapt his own work for the screen - unusual for a first time writer - and by age 24 he had a published novel and a produced screenplay to his credit.

Crowe followed Fast Times (and made his directorial debut) with another teen classic Say Anything (1989) and then turned out a little something for the twentysomething GenXers with Singles (1992). But his biggest success came in 1996 with Jerry Maguire. The Tom Cruise sports agent comedy-drama was nominated for five Academy Awards, including one for Crowe's original screenplay. But Crowe would have to wait a few years to finally win an Oscar®. The award for Best Screenplay came in 2000 for Almost Famous.

Crowe wasn't the only film novice at work on Fast Times. It was also director Amy Heckerling's first time out of the gate. She would go on to direct comedies like National Lampoon's European Vacation (1985) and Look Who's Talking(1989), but Heckerling's most notable post-Fast Times success came with another teen hit -- Clueless (1995). Fast Times also featured the work of some talented and relatively unknown young actors. Sean Penn had only Taps (1981) and some TV work to his credit before the film. And likewise, Jennifer Jason Leigh had appeared mainly in TV movies. Fast Times would be a breakthrough film for both stars. Other early performances featured in the film come from actor-director Forest Whitaker and Eric Stoltz. There's also a young Nicolas Cage, credited for the only time as Nicolas Coppola.

Reviews for Fast Times were mixed, though most critics noted it was a grade above typical teen sex romps. Pauline Kael for The New Yorker remarked, "I was surprised at how not-bad it is." Newsweek perhaps put it best, saying, "Fast Times...restores to kids their divine right to be silly, fumbling creatures with their own...dignity."

Producer: Irving Azoff, C.O. Erickson, Art Linson
Director: Amy Heckerling
Screenplay: Cameron Crowe
Cinematography: Matthew F. Leonetti
Film Editing: Eric Jenkins
Art Direction: Dan Lomino
Music: Joe Walsh
Cast: Sean Penn (Jeff Spicoli), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Stacy Hamilton), Judge Reinhold (Brad Hamilton), Robert Romanus (Mike Damone), Brian Backer (Mark Ratner), Phoebe Cates (Linda Barrett).
C-90m. Letterboxed.

by Stephanie Thames

Fast Times at Ridgemont High

As a genre, the teen sex comedy doesn't get a lot of respect. Still, many films of this set have earned a permanent spot on the pop culture landscape - like Porky's (1982), Risky Business (1983) and American Pie (1999). And leading the pack is 1982's Fast Times at Ridgemont High, a film that not only amused a generation and set the pace for the teen movies that followed, but a film that has, over the intervening two decades, evolved into a cult classic. Fast Times also launched the careers of practically everyone involved - from its up-and-coming stars (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Sean Penn, Judge Reinhold and Phoebe Cates) to director Amy Heckerling and most especially its talented young screenwriter Cameron Crowe. Anyone who's seen Almost Famous (2000) already knows Cameron Crowe's backstory. The semi-autobiographical Almost Famous, written and directed by Crowe, spins the seemingly fantastic tale of a 15-year old rock journalist -- inspired by Crowe's own teen years. When he was just 16, Crowe wrote his first cover story for Rolling Stone and soon quit high school to go on the road, interviewing bands and musicians the likes of Bob Dylan and Led Zeppelin. At 22, Crowe decided to go back to high school - this time as a journalist. He spent the 1979-80 school year posing as a student at a San Diego high school. Crowe's experiences became the novel Fast Times at Ridgemont High (with names changed to protect the innocent, though Crowe claims "all the incidents are true"). Oddly, Crowe's main discovery about his classmates was how conservative they were. "They're Reagan children," he commented. "It's scary." Crowe was called on to adapt his own work for the screen - unusual for a first time writer - and by age 24 he had a published novel and a produced screenplay to his credit. Crowe followed Fast Times (and made his directorial debut) with another teen classic Say Anything (1989) and then turned out a little something for the twentysomething GenXers with Singles (1992). But his biggest success came in 1996 with Jerry Maguire. The Tom Cruise sports agent comedy-drama was nominated for five Academy Awards, including one for Crowe's original screenplay. But Crowe would have to wait a few years to finally win an Oscar®. The award for Best Screenplay came in 2000 for Almost Famous. Crowe wasn't the only film novice at work on Fast Times. It was also director Amy Heckerling's first time out of the gate. She would go on to direct comedies like National Lampoon's European Vacation (1985) and Look Who's Talking(1989), but Heckerling's most notable post-Fast Times success came with another teen hit -- Clueless (1995). Fast Times also featured the work of some talented and relatively unknown young actors. Sean Penn had only Taps (1981) and some TV work to his credit before the film. And likewise, Jennifer Jason Leigh had appeared mainly in TV movies. Fast Times would be a breakthrough film for both stars. Other early performances featured in the film come from actor-director Forest Whitaker and Eric Stoltz. There's also a young Nicolas Cage, credited for the only time as Nicolas Coppola. Reviews for Fast Times were mixed, though most critics noted it was a grade above typical teen sex romps. Pauline Kael for The New Yorker remarked, "I was surprised at how not-bad it is." Newsweek perhaps put it best, saying, "Fast Times...restores to kids their divine right to be silly, fumbling creatures with their own...dignity." Producer: Irving Azoff, C.O. Erickson, Art Linson Director: Amy Heckerling Screenplay: Cameron Crowe Cinematography: Matthew F. Leonetti Film Editing: Eric Jenkins Art Direction: Dan Lomino Music: Joe Walsh Cast: Sean Penn (Jeff Spicoli), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Stacy Hamilton), Judge Reinhold (Brad Hamilton), Robert Romanus (Mike Damone), Brian Backer (Mark Ratner), Phoebe Cates (Linda Barrett). C-90m. Letterboxed. by Stephanie Thames

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 13, 1982

Re-released in United States on Video May 14, 1996

Released in United States August 1997

Released in United States August 1999

Shown at Radio City Film Festival sponsored by Universal Pictures August 20-24, 1997.

Shown at Gen Art Summer Arts Festival in New York City August 5-9, 1999.

Released in United States Summer August 13, 1982

Re-released in United States on Video May 14, 1996

Released in United States August 1997 (Shown at Radio City Film Festival sponsored by Universal Pictures August 20-24, 1997.)

Released in United States August 1999 (Shown at Gen Art Summer Arts Festival in New York City August 5-9, 1999.)