He Ran All the Way


1h 17m 1951
He Ran All the Way

Brief Synopsis

A crook on the run hides out in an innocent girl's apartment.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Film Noir
Release Date
Jul 13, 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 20 Jun 1951
Production Company
Roberts Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Long Beach--Long Beach Plunge public swimming pool, California, United States; Long Beach--Nu-Pike amusement park, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel He Ran All the Way by Sam Ross (New York, 1947)

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,069ft

Synopsis

Despite having a premonition that he will forever be on the run for murdering a man, Nick Robey agrees on a plan to make some easy money with his disreputable pal, Al Molin. The two men rob a man for a company payroll at the local train yard warehouse, but before they can make their getaway, Al is killed by a policeman and Nick is forced to shoot the policeman in order to flee. Once on the street, Nick ducks into a public swimming pool to avoid the police and bumps into Peg Dobbs, a nervous beginning swimmer. Fearful that he will look conspicuous alone, Nick tries to act calm and asks to take her home. Peg naively agrees, flattered by the young man's interest, and he escorts her to her family's tenement apartment, where she introduces him to her father, mother and younger brother Tommy, who are on their way to see a movie. Now alone in the apartment, Nick is uneasy and brusquely dances with Peg to music on the radio. Peg urges him to relax but Nick breaks down, saying he is in big trouble. Later when her parents return home, Nick, suspicious that they already know his real identity, holds Peg at gunpoint and admits to being the killer. However, Mr. Dobbs, a newspaper press operator, says that the newspaper only identified Molin in the article. Though he does not want to hurt anyone, Nick decides he must spend the night to collect his thoughts before his next move. In the morning Mr. Dobbs tries to hide the paper that prominently features a picture of Nick, but Nick spies it and, thinking he has caught the family in a conspiracy against him, decides he must stay. He allows the family to continue their daily routine, but tensions rise as he keeps one family member with him at all times as a hostage. Later, while on lunch break from her bakery job, Peg returns to the apartment to plead with Nick to leave, reminding him that he liked her at the pool, but Nick snaps that his predicament was the only reason he took interest in her. Peg returns to the bakery, where her father demands that she hide out at a girl friend's house. On the assembly line Peg's co-worker suggests that Peg shed her shyness and that, with some primping, Peg could get a man to do anything for her. Back at home Peg is late and Mrs. Dobbs explains to Nick that she trusts her daughter. An argument begins after Nick tells her that Peg thinks fondly of him, but when Mrs. Dobbs becomes distracted, has a sewing accident and faints, Nick, in a moment of kindness, carries her to the couch. Mr. Dobbs returns home to find Tommy afraid to go in the apartment because Nick is now in command of the household. They enter the apartment and the family gathers for a feast provided by Nick, but Mr. Dobbs refuses to allow his family to eat the food. Challenged, Nick fires his gun, forcing Mr. Dobbs to back down. His banquet spoiled, Nick rebukes the family for not willingly giving him temporary shelter, "something you would give an alley cat." Much later in the night, Peg returns home in an evening gown and her womanly figure catches Nick's eye. He kisses her and, asking for her support, Peg replies "all the way." Later while the others sleep, Mr. Dobbs inspects the living room, finds Peg's gown draped across the chair and assumes the worst. The next morning Nick, confused by the loyalty of their family, asks what Mr. Dobbs wants out of life. Mr. Dobbs turns the question around on him and Nick answers "money." He then tells Mr. Dobbs that Peg is out buying a car for him and a fight ensues between the men, but is quickly broken up when Peg returns and announces that the car will be delivered later that evening. Meanwhile Mrs. Dobbs and Tommy report to the police that Nick is hiding at their family residence. At the apartment Nick, now paranoid, demands to know the kind of car Peg has bought and to see the receipt. Peg describes a yellow convertible, but when she cannot produce the receipt, Nick drags her at gunpoint down the stairs, hysterically accusing her of double-crossing him. Once they reach the bottom floor, Mr. Dobbs, who is waiting outside, fires a shot into the foyer. Nick drops his gun near Peg, leaps for cover to the other side of the foyer, then orders Peg to pick up the gun. She does, but Nick lurches forward to take it from her and she shoots him. Fatally wounded, Nick stumbles outside, finding the convertible waiting at the curb. Staring into its headlights, Nick falls over dead as Mr. Dobbs hugs his traumatized daughter to his side.

Videos

Movie Clip

He Ran All The Way (1951) - We Can Dance Here Peg (Shelley Winters) has no idea Nick (John Garfield), has just shot a cop in a robbery, or why he’s brought her all the way home from the pool where they met, but she’s flattered, and so introduces her mother and father (Wallace Ford, Selena Royle), the sportcoat full of cash, in director John Berry’s He Ran All The Way, 1951.
He Ran All The Way (1951) - I Don't Want To Hurt Nobody Peg (Shelley Winters) is now being compassionate after Nick (John Garfield), whom we know is a fugitive who shot a cop, passed out at her apartment from tension, but his problem is revealed as her parents and brother (Wallace Ford, Selena Royle, Bobby Hyatt) return from the movies, in He Ran All The Way, 1951.
He Ran All The Way (1951) - I Got No Luck Today Opening scenes, ne'er-do-well Nick (John Garfield) with mother (Gladys George), then with buddy Al (Norman Lloyd) plotting a job, in soon-to-be-blacklisted director John Berry's He Ran All The Way, 1951.
He Ran All The Way (1951) - Officer Dies Of Wounds Fugitive Nick (John Garfield) has spent the night with the Dobbs family (Shelley Winters and Bobby Hyatt, Selena Royle and Wallace Ford their parents), and has promised to leave that morning, but the morning paper brings a complication, much of the scene in one shot by director John Berry, in He Ran All The Way, 1951.
He Ran All The Way (1951) - But You Do Go For Me? Suggestive and ambivalent scene from director John Berry, where Peg (Shelley Winters), her family held hostage now for days by fugitive Nick (John Garfield), comes home dolled up, maybe truly falling for him, inspiring him to new ideas, in He Ran All The Way, 1951.
He Ran All The Way (1951) - You're Too Tense Fresh off a robbery and shootout, Nick (John Garfield) ducking the cops in a public pool (shot in Long Beach, Ca.) meets Peg (Shelley Winters) in director John Berry's He Ran All The Way, 1951.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Film Noir
Release Date
Jul 13, 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 20 Jun 1951
Production Company
Roberts Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Long Beach--Long Beach Plunge public swimming pool, California, United States; Long Beach--Nu-Pike amusement park, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel He Ran All the Way by Sam Ross (New York, 1947)

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,069ft

Articles

He Ran All the Way


A tense, claustrophobic thriller that is often overlooked in film noir retrospectives due to its relative obscurity, He Ran All the Way (1951) is an almost perfect example of the genre with its doomed protagonist, gritty, urban setting, and overall sense of futility and paranoia. At the story's open, two petty thieves, Nick (John Garfield) and Al (Norman Lloyd), plan a payroll robbery. But the heist doesn't go as planned; Al is wounded by the police and Nick takes refuge at a public swimming pool where he befriends Peg (Shelley Winters), a shy blonde. When Peg takes Nick home to meet her family, tensions mount and Nick, growing increasingly agitated, takes the family hostage while masterminding his escape from the city.

In many ways, the sense of paranoia that pervades every frame of He Ran All the Way was real. John Garfield, director John Berry, and two of the screenwriters, Hugo Butler and Dalton Trumbo (who is uncredited), were already blacklisted by the industry at the time of He Ran All the Way due to their refusal to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee. Trumbo, in fact, had already served time in a Kentucky prison for contempt of court along with other members of the "Hollywood Ten." He Ran All the Way would prove to be Garfield's final film; he died of a heart attack a year later, the cause partly attributed to the strain of being branded a communist sympathizer and blacklisted by the industry. The other three were soon forced into exile; Berry and Butler relocated to Europe where they were able to pick up various film projects, Trumbo moved to Mexico and continued writing screenplays for Hollywood features which he submitted under pseudonyms through "fronts."

He Ran All the Way pre-dates the popular stage play (and movie), The Desperate Hours by a few years and deals with the same set of circumstances: a family trapped in their own home by a hostile outside force. Unfortunately, Berry's film never got the credit it deserved in 1951 (it was an independent production picked up for distribution by United Artists) but its reputation has grown considerably over the years, not only for its excellent performances, sharp dialogue and stylish direction but also for James Wong Howe's atmospheric cinematography and Franz Waxman's moody score.

Prior to the making of He Ran All the Way, Shelley Winters was under contract to Universal to make a low budget turn-of-the-century drama about a belly dancer named Little Egypt (1951). Anxious to start work on Berry's film, she concocted a plan to get herself fired from Little Egypt and promptly gained enough weight to make herself look particularly unappealing for her wardrobe tests. The ruse worked and Winters went on a crash diet, losing fifteen pounds in a week - just in time to report to work on He Ran All the Way.

According to Winters in her autobiography, Shelley II: The Middle of My Century, "the time frame of He Ran All the Way covered twelve hours. It starts in the early afternoon in a swimming pool (the Long Beach Plunge). James Wong Howe's camera was at the side of the pool above the water. The director had arranged for a stuntman double to do Garfield's swimming. Garfield had had a severe heart attack at the Beverly Hills Tennis Club a few months earlier. I knew that underwater swimming was especially taxing to the heart. I rehearsed with the double, but when we came to the actual shooting of the scene, Garfield refused to let the double do it. We had to do the scene about ten times to get the lighting in the water right. It was scary and unnecessary...Back then, I could not understand why John insisted on doing this dangerous shot himself. In retrospect, it seems almost as if he unconsciously wanted another heart attack. I didn't understand the political trouble he was in. I just knew that Warner Brothers, by breaking his contract and casting him adrift, were destroying one of their most valuable properties and breaking his heart." Despite her co-star's troubles, Winters remembers Garfield's kindness to her most of all. "He was generous to me in every way a big star can be to a newcomer. He gave me the best camera angles in two-shots, made sure the camera favored me and the audience saw both of my eyes. He spent hours on my close-ups, and if he didn't like the rushes and felt I could look prettier, he insisted that the director relight the scene and reshoot it."

The attention was justified because among Winters' films, He Ran All the Way features one of her best performances. Even Winters admits it "was one of the most remarkable and important films I was ever to do."

Producer: John Garfield, Bob Roberts, Paul Trivers
Director: John Berry
Screenplay: Sam Ross (novel), Dalton Trumbo, Hugo Butler, Guy Endore
Production Design: Harry Horner
Cinematography: James Wong Howe
Costume Design: Joe King
Film Editing: Francis D. Lyon
Original Music: Franz Waxman
Cast: John Garfield (Nick Robey), Shelley Winters (Peg Dobbs), Wallace Ford (Mr. Dobbs), Selena Royle (Mrs. Dobbs), Gladys George (Mrs. Robey), Bobby Hyatt (Tommy Dobbs), Norman Lloyd (Al Molin).
BW-78m.

by Jeff Stafford

He Ran All The Way

He Ran All the Way

A tense, claustrophobic thriller that is often overlooked in film noir retrospectives due to its relative obscurity, He Ran All the Way (1951) is an almost perfect example of the genre with its doomed protagonist, gritty, urban setting, and overall sense of futility and paranoia. At the story's open, two petty thieves, Nick (John Garfield) and Al (Norman Lloyd), plan a payroll robbery. But the heist doesn't go as planned; Al is wounded by the police and Nick takes refuge at a public swimming pool where he befriends Peg (Shelley Winters), a shy blonde. When Peg takes Nick home to meet her family, tensions mount and Nick, growing increasingly agitated, takes the family hostage while masterminding his escape from the city. In many ways, the sense of paranoia that pervades every frame of He Ran All the Way was real. John Garfield, director John Berry, and two of the screenwriters, Hugo Butler and Dalton Trumbo (who is uncredited), were already blacklisted by the industry at the time of He Ran All the Way due to their refusal to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee. Trumbo, in fact, had already served time in a Kentucky prison for contempt of court along with other members of the "Hollywood Ten." He Ran All the Way would prove to be Garfield's final film; he died of a heart attack a year later, the cause partly attributed to the strain of being branded a communist sympathizer and blacklisted by the industry. The other three were soon forced into exile; Berry and Butler relocated to Europe where they were able to pick up various film projects, Trumbo moved to Mexico and continued writing screenplays for Hollywood features which he submitted under pseudonyms through "fronts." He Ran All the Way pre-dates the popular stage play (and movie), The Desperate Hours by a few years and deals with the same set of circumstances: a family trapped in their own home by a hostile outside force. Unfortunately, Berry's film never got the credit it deserved in 1951 (it was an independent production picked up for distribution by United Artists) but its reputation has grown considerably over the years, not only for its excellent performances, sharp dialogue and stylish direction but also for James Wong Howe's atmospheric cinematography and Franz Waxman's moody score. Prior to the making of He Ran All the Way, Shelley Winters was under contract to Universal to make a low budget turn-of-the-century drama about a belly dancer named Little Egypt (1951). Anxious to start work on Berry's film, she concocted a plan to get herself fired from Little Egypt and promptly gained enough weight to make herself look particularly unappealing for her wardrobe tests. The ruse worked and Winters went on a crash diet, losing fifteen pounds in a week - just in time to report to work on He Ran All the Way. According to Winters in her autobiography, Shelley II: The Middle of My Century, "the time frame of He Ran All the Way covered twelve hours. It starts in the early afternoon in a swimming pool (the Long Beach Plunge). James Wong Howe's camera was at the side of the pool above the water. The director had arranged for a stuntman double to do Garfield's swimming. Garfield had had a severe heart attack at the Beverly Hills Tennis Club a few months earlier. I knew that underwater swimming was especially taxing to the heart. I rehearsed with the double, but when we came to the actual shooting of the scene, Garfield refused to let the double do it. We had to do the scene about ten times to get the lighting in the water right. It was scary and unnecessary...Back then, I could not understand why John insisted on doing this dangerous shot himself. In retrospect, it seems almost as if he unconsciously wanted another heart attack. I didn't understand the political trouble he was in. I just knew that Warner Brothers, by breaking his contract and casting him adrift, were destroying one of their most valuable properties and breaking his heart." Despite her co-star's troubles, Winters remembers Garfield's kindness to her most of all. "He was generous to me in every way a big star can be to a newcomer. He gave me the best camera angles in two-shots, made sure the camera favored me and the audience saw both of my eyes. He spent hours on my close-ups, and if he didn't like the rushes and felt I could look prettier, he insisted that the director relight the scene and reshoot it." The attention was justified because among Winters' films, He Ran All the Way features one of her best performances. Even Winters admits it "was one of the most remarkable and important films I was ever to do." Producer: John Garfield, Bob Roberts, Paul Trivers Director: John Berry Screenplay: Sam Ross (novel), Dalton Trumbo, Hugo Butler, Guy Endore Production Design: Harry Horner Cinematography: James Wong Howe Costume Design: Joe King Film Editing: Francis D. Lyon Original Music: Franz Waxman Cast: John Garfield (Nick Robey), Shelley Winters (Peg Dobbs), Wallace Ford (Mr. Dobbs), Selena Royle (Mrs. Dobbs), Gladys George (Mrs. Robey), Bobby Hyatt (Tommy Dobbs), Norman Lloyd (Al Molin). BW-78m. by Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Director John Berry and co-scripter Hugo Butler's names were removed from the credits for a time after release, due to the blacklisting of supposed Communist sympathizers at the time. Assistant director Emmett Emerson is thus often credited as the film's director.

Notes

According to a May 24, 1950 Hollywood Reporter news item, the novel He Ran All the Way was originally bought by Liberty Films from author Sam Ross in 1947 as a directing vehicle for George Stevens. In 1950 Bob Roberts of Roberts Productions, Inc. bought the property from Liberty. A November 10, 1950 Hollywood Reporter production chart credits Steve Bass with sound for the film, although onscreen credits list Vic Appel and Mac Dagleish. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office objected to the "excessive brutality" exhibited by the character "Nick Robey" and prohibited scenes showing a policeman being killed at the hands of criminals. The scene in which the policeman is shot was changed from an immediate death to the policeman being wounded at the time of the crime. Several of the film's violent scenes were altered and the policeman was wounded, instead of killed, in the opening scenes. Location shooting took place at the Long Beach Plunge public swimming pool and Nu-Pike, a mile-long waterfront amusement park in Long Beach, CA.
       Star John Garfield, who was blacklisted by the HUAC in 1951 for refusing to name friends as communists, died in 1952. He Ran All the Way was his last film. It was also the last feature-length film John Berry made before being identified as a communist and blacklisted by the HUAC. Although not listed in the credits, Dalton Trumbo co-wrote the film's screenplay with credited writer Hugo Butler. Trumbo was jailed in 1947 for refusing to testify before HUAC and his credit on the film was officially restored by the WGA in 2000; Guy Endore acted as his front.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States July 13, 1951

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1951

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 23 - May 7, 1998.

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 23 - May 7, 1998.)

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1951

Released in United States July 13, 1951