The Adventures of Sadie


1h 28m 1955

Brief Synopsis

Rich Sadie Patch is marooned on a desert island after an emergency on her cruise-ship. With her are Irish stoker Pat, prickly young Jimmy Carrol, and bald and bookish Professor Gibble. All fancy their chances.

Film Details

Also Known As
Our Girl Friday
Release Date
May 1955
Premiere Information
London, England opening: 17 Dec 1953; New York opening: 17 May 1955
Production Company
Renown Pictures Corp., Ltd.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Location
London, England, Great Britain; Majorca, Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Film Length
7,905ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

During an ocean cruise, spoiled heiress Sadie Patch argues with her overprotective parents about their constant worry that she will be led astray by fortune hunters. The flirtatious, headstrong Sadie then quarrels with journalist Jimmy Carrol when she accidentally trips over his legs, and the equally opinionated Carrol takes an immediate dislike to her. That night, a heavy fog causes the ocean liner to run into another ship, and during the ensuing chaos, only Sadie, Carrol, lecturer Professor Gimble and ship's stoker Pat Plunket make it onto a lifeboat. The pragmatic, Irish Pat swigs rum, while the others debate their chances of rescue. The next day, the dinghy drifts toward an island but is wrecked on an outlying reef. The four castaways reach the beach, although with only a handful of supplies, they are forced to rely on one another for shelter and food. After a quick exploration, the men determine that the island is deserted and decide that as Sadie is the only woman present, they must make a pact not to pursue her romantically so that her virtue will remain unsullied and they will not quarrel amongst themselves. The pedantic Gibble is especially concerned with maintaining the formalities of "civilized life," and is worried that Pat, because he is from a lower-class background, will not fulfill their gentlemen's agreement. As time passes, it is Carrol, rather than Pat, who first falls in love with Sadie and begins to press his affections on her. One afternoon, after Sadie has swum out to the dinghy to retrieve supplies and found a bottle of rum, she and Carrol decide to hide it from Pat. They bury the rum in a cave, and there Carrol steals a kiss from Sadie, although she refuses to assure him that she prefers him over the others. Later, Carrol again tells Sadie that he loves her, but she dismisses his attentions as arising from the fact that she is the only woman available. Another day, Pat and Gibble are building a bonfire when Pat teases Gibble about his own obvious affections for Sadie. Fearing that Pat is correct about Carrol's having broken their pact, and giving into his desire for Sadie, Gibble dashes off to find her. After Gibble declares his intentions, he convinces himself that because Sadie allowed him to kiss her hand, she is in love with him. Carrol and Gibble then begin an all-out war, each striving to spend time alone with Sadie while preventing the other fellow from doing so. Sadie is driven to distraction by their constant bickering, although Pat secretly encourages each man behind the other's back. Finally exhausted, Carrol decides to live alone on the other side of the island. Sadie begs Pat to drive off Gibble also so that she can have some peace and quiet, and later that night, an affronted Gibble watches from a distance as Pat appears to carry the unprotesting Sadie into her hut. Unknown to Gibble, Sadie had merely fallen asleep, and Pat tucked her into her cot. Fearing the worst, Gibble relays the news to Carrol, and the two decide to unite against Pat. Returning to the beach, Gibble and Carrol attempt to badmouth Pat to Sadie, but Pat does worse damage to himself when he crossly storms around, decrying the lack of liquor on the island. Worrying that none of them will be safe while the bottle of rum is hidden in the cave, Sadie, Carrol and Gibble rush to find it but Pat discovers their actions and gets the bottle. Later, a drunken Pat winds up in a fistfight with both Carrol and Gibble, which is finally ended when Gibble, who has lost his glasses, knocks Pat out with a lucky blow. At first the group fears that Pat is dead, but after he revives, the men reconcile and spend much time laying about, chatting. An irritated Sadie informs them that she will now be the leader and assigns them various tasks. Weary of Sadie's dictatorship, the men decide to go on strike. Sadie again takes charge, however, stating that their little group will never function properly until she "marries" one of the men and the others resign themselves to the arrangement. She forces the men to draw straws for the "honor" of being her husband, with Gibble being the loser. Although Gibble tries to persuade first Pat and then Carrol to take his position as Sadie's husband, both men refuse. As Carrol and Gibble are talking, a ship appears on the horizen, and the castaways are rescued. When the schooner's officer, Morgan, flirts with the still-lovely Sadie, Pat cynically remarks to his friends that that is the last they will see of her. Aboard the schooner, the captain, titillated by the idea of three men marooned with a young woman, questions them about romance, but the men all staunchly affirm that they acted as gentlemen. Seeing Sadie dressed in proper clothes, in civilized surroundings, Gibble again falls in love with her and expresses his wish that they be married. Sadie, upset by his assertion that she had "no mystery" on the island, demurs, and also refuses Carrol's advances. Sadie then finds Pat and tells him that she loved him, and only him, from the beginning. Pat declines her marriage invitation, however, even when she states that she is rich, telling her that he preferred her as she was on the island. Determined to have Pat, Sadie tells the captain that no one will believe that she was not compromised during her ordeal and demands that he marry her to Pat. The captain is attempting to conduct the ceremony, much against Pat's wishes, when the schooner sinks. Carrol winds up in a dinghy with the crying Chinese cook, while Gibble turns up on an island inhabited by an amorous spinster still shipwrecked from the original cruise. A bedraggled Sadie lands at the old island and is at first non-plussed, but when she hears Pat singing in her hut, she runs happily toward him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Our Girl Friday
Release Date
May 1955
Premiere Information
London, England opening: 17 Dec 1953; New York opening: 17 May 1955
Production Company
Renown Pictures Corp., Ltd.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Location
London, England, Great Britain; Majorca, Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Film Length
7,905ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film was released and reviewed in Great Britain as Our Girl Friday. The title and composer of a Spanish-language song sung at the beginning of the picture have not been determined. Although the only onscreen writing credit reads: "Screenplay by Noel Langley," some contemporary sources reported that the film was based on Norman Lindsay's novel The Cautious Amorist. Modern sources, however, have pointed out the plot resemblances to films such as the 1919 Famous Players-Lasky Corp. picture Male and Female; the 1934 Paramount release We're Not Dressing (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20 and 1931-40); and the 1958 Columbia picture Paradise Lagoon (see below), all of which were based on the play The Admirable Crichton by Sir James M. Barrie. As noted in the onscreen credits, the picture was shot on location on the island of Majorca (spelled Mallorca onscreen), with interiors filmed in London, England. According to Joan Collins' autobiography, Eddie Fowlie served as the film's propman.