Angel and the Badman


1h 40m 1947
Angel and the Badman

Brief Synopsis

When a Quaker girl nurses a notorious gunman back to health, he tries to adopt her peaceful ways.

Film Details

Also Known As
Angel and the Outlaw
Genre
Romance
Western
Release Date
Feb 15, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Patnel Productions
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Flagstaff, Arizona, United States; Monument Valley, Utah, United States; Sedona, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Wounded and on the run, notorious gunman Quirt Evans gallops onto a farm owned by Quaker Thomas Worth and his family and promptly collapses from exhaustion. When Quirt urgently insists upon sending a telegram, Thomas and his daughter Penelope drive him into town in their wagon. After wiring a claim to the land recorder's office, Quirt kisses Penny and then passes out. Ignoring the doctor's advice to rid themselves of the gunfighter, the compassionate Worth family tends to the delirious Quirt, and Penny becomes intrigued by his ravings of past loves. Days later, Quirt regains consciousness and Penny patiently explains the family's credo of non-violence. Three weeks later, Laredo Stevens and Hondo Jeffries ride into town looking for Quirt. When Penny's younger brother Johnny rushes home to inform Quirt of his visitors, Quirt quickly prepares to flee, and Penny, now smitten with Quirt, offers to run off with him. At the sound of approaching horses, Quirt grabs his gun and discovers that it has been emptied. Training his gun on the doorway, Quirt calmly greets Hondo and Laredo. Thinking that Quirt has the upper hand, Laredo, who has come for Quirt's deed to the land, offers to buy his claim. When Quirt sets the price at $20,000, Laredo hands over $5,000 in gold and challenges him to come for the balance when he is able. Afterward, Quirt saddles his horse with the intention of leaving, but when Penny begs him to stay, he changes his mind. Later, while helping with the farm chores, Quirt learns that cantankerous rancher Frederick Carson has dammed up the stream that runs through the valley, thus draining the Worths' irrigation ditches. Immediately proceeding to the Carson ranch, Quirt demands that Carson open the dam, and Carson, intimidated by Quirt's reputation, complies. Soon after, water flows onto the Worths' land, and in gratitude, Mrs. Worth treats a boil on Carson's neck and plies him with baked goods. This newly attained accord between neighbors gives Quirt a sense of accomplishment. One Sunday, Penny asks Quirt to join the family for a ride. Before they leave, Marshal Wistful McClintock comes to question Quirt about a stagecoach robbery and the family swears that Quirt was with them at the time of the robbery. The marshal then asks Quirt why he resigned as Wyatt Earp's deputy, sold his cattle spread and crossed over to the wrong side of the law soon after cattleman Walt Ennis was gunned down by Laredo in a saloon brawl. When Quirt refuses to answer, the marshal leaves. Penny then begs Quirt to steer clear of Laredo and he acquiesces because of his love for her. As Quirt and the Worths ride to the Quaker gathering, Quirt's erstwhile sidekick, Randy McCall, stops them along the trail and decides to tag along. While the Quakers commence their meeting, Randy tells Quirt that Laredo plans to rustle a herd of cattle and suggests that they then steal the herd from Laredo and let him take the blame. As Randy finishes outlining his plot, Mr. Worth awards Quirt with a Bible for ending the feud with Carson. Fearing that he will never be able to live up to Penny's expectations, Quirt abruptly leaves with Randy. Reaching the pass just as Laredo's gang gallops down to stampede the herd, Quirt and Randy attack the rustlers and steal the herd from them. In the town of Rim Rock that night, Quirt and Randy celebrate their victory with showgirls Lila Neal and Christine Taylor. When Lila, sensing a change in her old flame, teases Quirt about his Bible, Quirt becomes angry and rides back to the Worth farm. Overjoyed by his return, Penny throws her arms around him just as the marshal arrives to question Quirt about the rustling. Quirt states that Lila can provide him with an alibi, causing Penny to become jealous. Although the marshal warns Quirt that he is the wrong man for Penny and will inevitably wind up at the end of a rope, Quirt decides to propose to her anyway. Instead of replying, Penny invites Quirt to join her picking blackberries. As they wander through the bushes, Quirt, prodded by Penny's questions, recalls his childhood. Reared by the kindly Walt Ennis after his parents were massacred by Indians, the young Quirt found himself alone once again after Ennis was murdered in a saloon fight. His story completed, Quirt and Penny begin the journey home when their wagon is ambushed by Laredo and Hondo. Spooked, the horses gallop out of control, causing the wagon to plunge over a cliff into the river, temporarily submerging both Penny and Quirt. When Penny develops a life-threatening fever due to the accident, Quirt straps on his pistol and rides to town to exact revenge. After Quirt leaves, Penny's fever suddenly breaks, and she regains her lucidity. In town, Quirt is about to draw down on Laredo and Hondo when Penny and her family arrive in their wagon. No longer driven by revenge, Quirt surrenders his gun to Penny. As Laredo and Hondo prepare to gun down Quirt, the marshal appears and shoots them both. After Quirt renounces lawlessness in favor of farming and rides off in the Worths' wagon with Penny, the marshal picks up Quirt's discarded weapon from the dust.

Film Details

Also Known As
Angel and the Outlaw
Genre
Romance
Western
Release Date
Feb 15, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Patnel Productions
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Flagstaff, Arizona, United States; Monument Valley, Utah, United States; Sedona, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Angel and the Badman on Blu-ray


John Ford's Stagecoach may have made John Wayne a front rank star, but he never really stopped being an old-fashioned movie cowboy. Wayne made action-romances with stars like Marlene Dietrich and seemingly won the war singlehanded in the pictures The Flying Tigers and The Fighting Seabees. His strongest studio connection was at Republic, which couldn't afford to compete with the majors. Studio head Herbert J. Yates allowed him to begin producing pictures as well. Wayne made three for Republic before establishing his independent company, Batjac. The first is Angel and the Badman, one of Wayne's most endearing star vehicles. The story of a gunslinger reformed by the love of a young Quaker is a pleasant little morality tale. Wayne's co-star is Gail Russell, whose sensual eyes and face could easily reform any man alive.

Writer-director James Edward Grant would become one of John Wayne's closest collaborators on hits like Hondo and The Alamo. His original story has the simplicity of a silent western fable. Disillusioned Quirt Evans (Wayne) has turned to outlawry. Wounded, he's taken in and cared for by the Worths, a family of Quakers having difficulties establishing their farm. Young Penelope Worth (Gail Russell) develops a crush on Quirt while he's still unconscious, and becomes determined to make him her fella. When Quirt recovers he is surprised to find that such good and generous people even exist. Hearing that neighbor Fred Carson (Paul Hurst) has selfishly cut off the local water supply, Quirt rides to confront him. Carson opens the water gates without delay. The hospitality of Mrs. Worth (Irene Rich) then turns Carson into a fast friend. Quirt is shocked when the Quaker elders honor him with the gift of a Bible, as by now he feels he's not good enough for the adorable Penelope. That feeling is aggravated by the appearance of Quirt's crony Laredo Stevens (Bruce Cabot), who seems determined to cheat the now-recovered gunfighter out of a piece of property. Territorial Marshal Wistful McClintock (Harry Carey) is also close at hand, waiting for evidence to pin a stagecoach robbery on Quirt. He warns Penelope that Quirt is a bad risk, but she isn't about to give up the man of her dreams.

Angel and the Badman is a hundred-minute vacation from violent western entertainment. Its Quaker pioneer family is an unexpected sagebrush precursor to William Wyler and Jessamyn West's pacifist drama Friendly Persuasion. The film generates great chemistry between John Wayne and the dark-haired Gail Russell, who is the antidote for two hundred woefully under-written female parts in Republic westerns. As pure-hearted as they come, Penelope is intrigued, not angered, when Quirt mumbles in his sleep about previous lovers. She even forgives him when he hides out with some dance hall girls. The likeable Wayne is in fine form, and the way Penelope's eyes widen when she sees him without a shirt tells us how thoroughly she's attracted to him. We can judge the extent of Quirt's infatuation by the number of times Penelope convinces him to keep his gun in its holster, and stay around the Worth farm. Wayne would allow the romances in some of his later movies (such as the James Edward Grant-penned McClintock!) to become tiresome parodies of gender roles, mostly based on his hit The Quiet Man. By contrast Quirt and Penelope are inventing their new life together. We just hope Quirt continues to fit in with all of the Quaker values.

A couple of years later John Ford would direct Wayne in Three Godfathers, a purposefully naïve allegory with a Sunday School vision of the West. Angel and the Badman is just as sweet, without the excess sentimentality. Once the outlaw Quirt Evans sees a better way of living with the Worths, his redemption is well under way. The real villains are the two-faced Laredo and his sidekick Hondo, who step in at the conclusion to pay for their sins, and apparently Quirt's as well. Angel and the Badman is also much like Joel McCrea's pacifist western Four Faces West, which is distinguished by the fact that not one shot is fired in anger. When the Quakers hide his bullets, Quirt is forced to bluff his way through one encounter with an empty six-shooter. The crotchety Fred Carson suddenly becomes very cooperative when he realizes he's facing the deadly Quirt Evans, an occurrence that pleasantly, if not convincingly, brings peace to the valley. The Carson-Worth feud seems based on nothing at all, not even religious intolerance or an aversion to the words Thee and Thou. The film seems proud of this happy "friendly persuasion", even though it teaches the dubious lesson that the threat of violence will turn people into good neighbors.

For the most part, Quirt Evans' conversion to pacifist-agrarian values is beautifully handled. All the outlaw has known for years has been struggle and hostility. The Worth farm is a living Utopia for a strong young guy able to work the land, and with Penelope extending an amorous invitation nothing could be more desirable. The balance of Angel and the Badman sees Quirt and Penelope bravely facing the consequences of his past. As the Marshall is played by the kindly, fair-minded Harry Carey, the king of sentimental silent-era cowboy heroes, we look forward to a happy ending.

Angel and the Badman is one of Republic's better-looking productions. First-time director Grant probably received plenty of assistance from the ambitious Wayne and the ace cameraman Archie Stout. The film is very smoothly directed, with attractive interiors and exteriors that make us believe a genuine little frontier society is nestled up there in the foothills of Sedona, Arizona.

Stuntmen Richard Farnsworth and Chuck Roberson did some of the more difficult cowboy tricks. Both horsemen would later have long acting careers in small parts. In one of the first scenes Gail Russell appears to be an experienced wrangler, driving a buckboard wagon forward at a fast clip and stopping its horse team right on the mark. As it turns out, the horses are really being driven by a stuntman crouching in a hidden compartment, using a second set of plainly visible reins! Just look below Gail's feet on the buckboard.

Olive Films' Blu-ray of Angel and the Badman is an almost flawless transfer of this highly entertaining western romance. A few small scratches appear near the main title, and some white specks align near reel changes, but otherwise the sharp, handsome transfer is very clean indeed. Richard Hageman's traditional music cues sound robust on the HD soundtrack. So many Republic pictures have been released in sad 16mm dupes that one sometimes forgets how technically well crafted they were.

By Glenn Erickson
Angel And The Badman On Blu-Ray

Angel and the Badman on Blu-ray

John Ford's Stagecoach may have made John Wayne a front rank star, but he never really stopped being an old-fashioned movie cowboy. Wayne made action-romances with stars like Marlene Dietrich and seemingly won the war singlehanded in the pictures The Flying Tigers and The Fighting Seabees. His strongest studio connection was at Republic, which couldn't afford to compete with the majors. Studio head Herbert J. Yates allowed him to begin producing pictures as well. Wayne made three for Republic before establishing his independent company, Batjac. The first is Angel and the Badman, one of Wayne's most endearing star vehicles. The story of a gunslinger reformed by the love of a young Quaker is a pleasant little morality tale. Wayne's co-star is Gail Russell, whose sensual eyes and face could easily reform any man alive. Writer-director James Edward Grant would become one of John Wayne's closest collaborators on hits like Hondo and The Alamo. His original story has the simplicity of a silent western fable. Disillusioned Quirt Evans (Wayne) has turned to outlawry. Wounded, he's taken in and cared for by the Worths, a family of Quakers having difficulties establishing their farm. Young Penelope Worth (Gail Russell) develops a crush on Quirt while he's still unconscious, and becomes determined to make him her fella. When Quirt recovers he is surprised to find that such good and generous people even exist. Hearing that neighbor Fred Carson (Paul Hurst) has selfishly cut off the local water supply, Quirt rides to confront him. Carson opens the water gates without delay. The hospitality of Mrs. Worth (Irene Rich) then turns Carson into a fast friend. Quirt is shocked when the Quaker elders honor him with the gift of a Bible, as by now he feels he's not good enough for the adorable Penelope. That feeling is aggravated by the appearance of Quirt's crony Laredo Stevens (Bruce Cabot), who seems determined to cheat the now-recovered gunfighter out of a piece of property. Territorial Marshal Wistful McClintock (Harry Carey) is also close at hand, waiting for evidence to pin a stagecoach robbery on Quirt. He warns Penelope that Quirt is a bad risk, but she isn't about to give up the man of her dreams. Angel and the Badman is a hundred-minute vacation from violent western entertainment. Its Quaker pioneer family is an unexpected sagebrush precursor to William Wyler and Jessamyn West's pacifist drama Friendly Persuasion. The film generates great chemistry between John Wayne and the dark-haired Gail Russell, who is the antidote for two hundred woefully under-written female parts in Republic westerns. As pure-hearted as they come, Penelope is intrigued, not angered, when Quirt mumbles in his sleep about previous lovers. She even forgives him when he hides out with some dance hall girls. The likeable Wayne is in fine form, and the way Penelope's eyes widen when she sees him without a shirt tells us how thoroughly she's attracted to him. We can judge the extent of Quirt's infatuation by the number of times Penelope convinces him to keep his gun in its holster, and stay around the Worth farm. Wayne would allow the romances in some of his later movies (such as the James Edward Grant-penned McClintock!) to become tiresome parodies of gender roles, mostly based on his hit The Quiet Man. By contrast Quirt and Penelope are inventing their new life together. We just hope Quirt continues to fit in with all of the Quaker values. A couple of years later John Ford would direct Wayne in Three Godfathers, a purposefully naïve allegory with a Sunday School vision of the West. Angel and the Badman is just as sweet, without the excess sentimentality. Once the outlaw Quirt Evans sees a better way of living with the Worths, his redemption is well under way. The real villains are the two-faced Laredo and his sidekick Hondo, who step in at the conclusion to pay for their sins, and apparently Quirt's as well. Angel and the Badman is also much like Joel McCrea's pacifist western Four Faces West, which is distinguished by the fact that not one shot is fired in anger. When the Quakers hide his bullets, Quirt is forced to bluff his way through one encounter with an empty six-shooter. The crotchety Fred Carson suddenly becomes very cooperative when he realizes he's facing the deadly Quirt Evans, an occurrence that pleasantly, if not convincingly, brings peace to the valley. The Carson-Worth feud seems based on nothing at all, not even religious intolerance or an aversion to the words Thee and Thou. The film seems proud of this happy "friendly persuasion", even though it teaches the dubious lesson that the threat of violence will turn people into good neighbors. For the most part, Quirt Evans' conversion to pacifist-agrarian values is beautifully handled. All the outlaw has known for years has been struggle and hostility. The Worth farm is a living Utopia for a strong young guy able to work the land, and with Penelope extending an amorous invitation nothing could be more desirable. The balance of Angel and the Badman sees Quirt and Penelope bravely facing the consequences of his past. As the Marshall is played by the kindly, fair-minded Harry Carey, the king of sentimental silent-era cowboy heroes, we look forward to a happy ending. Angel and the Badman is one of Republic's better-looking productions. First-time director Grant probably received plenty of assistance from the ambitious Wayne and the ace cameraman Archie Stout. The film is very smoothly directed, with attractive interiors and exteriors that make us believe a genuine little frontier society is nestled up there in the foothills of Sedona, Arizona. Stuntmen Richard Farnsworth and Chuck Roberson did some of the more difficult cowboy tricks. Both horsemen would later have long acting careers in small parts. In one of the first scenes Gail Russell appears to be an experienced wrangler, driving a buckboard wagon forward at a fast clip and stopping its horse team right on the mark. As it turns out, the horses are really being driven by a stuntman crouching in a hidden compartment, using a second set of plainly visible reins! Just look below Gail's feet on the buckboard. Olive Films' Blu-ray of Angel and the Badman is an almost flawless transfer of this highly entertaining western romance. A few small scratches appear near the main title, and some white specks align near reel changes, but otherwise the sharp, handsome transfer is very clean indeed. Richard Hageman's traditional music cues sound robust on the HD soundtrack. So many Republic pictures have been released in sad 16mm dupes that one sometimes forgets how technically well crafted they were. By Glenn Erickson

Angel and the Badman


By 1946, Wayne had been a contract actor at Republic Studios for 8 years. He enjoyed working there but desired more control over his films and his roles, so he told studio chief Herbert Yates that he wanted to produce a movie himself. Yates, fearful of losing Wayne to the bigger studios, gave the actor his chance, and the result was Angel and the Badman (1947), a modest Western about a gunman torn between violence and the Quaker girl he falls in love with. A mystical story, especially for Wayne, the film turned out well but was not a big hit. The Duke's fans probably found it too lacking in action.

The script had been written by James Edward Grant, who had never written for Wayne before but whose work the Duke greatly admired. Grant had also never directed before and was anxious to try so Wayne gave him a shot. (Grant would only direct once more, the 1954 Ring of Fear, though he continued to collaborate with Wayne as a screenwriter until he died in 1966.) Wayne made sure the rest of the cast and crew were filled with top talent which included himself, Harry Carey and Gail Russell, a ravishing brunette beauty from Paramount Pictures. Legendary stuntman Yakima Canutt came aboard as stunt coordinator and 2nd-unit director, and Archie Stout was hired as the director of photography. Stout was a true Hollywood veteran with over 100 features to his credit, many of them low-budget Monogram Westerns. By the time he retired in 1954, he had photographed Wayne in 27 pictures. (Stout also won a cinematography Oscar for his 2nd-unit work on The Quiet Man (1952), to this day the only Oscar awarded to a 2nd-unit D.P.)

Wayne had recently married Esperanza 'Chata' Baur, and his new workload as producer didn't sit too well with her. She later complained, "He talks of {business} constantly. When he reads, it's scripts. Our dinner guests always talk business, and he spends all his time working, discussing work, or planning work." Chata also grew convinced that Wayne and Gail Russell were having an affair. Wayne vehemently denied this. He had, however, taken a great interest in the young, troubled actress, listening to her problems and offering advice.

Russell was not only notoriously shy and fearful of the camera but also of the entire Hollywood machine and her rising success in it. She had been discovered while still in high school and placed into the star system by Paramount despite her total lack of acting experience - and with the pressing of her mother, who herself had always wanted to be an actress. "Everything happened so fast," Russell said. "I was going to Santa Monica High and the next thing I knew I was being groomed for a picture." She turned to alcohol to calm herself on sets, and over time gradually succumbed to alcoholism, dying of the disease in 1961, at age 36.

As her career and life deteriorated, Wayne continued to help her and give her roles when he could. Russell appreciated the interest, later saying of Wayne: "The one word that defines Duke is 'honest.' He's an honest man. He can't be otherwise." Wayne went on to produce 20 films (some uncredited), including two of director Budd Boetticher's best pictures: Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Seven Men From Now (1956), the latter of which featured Gail Russell in one of her final roles - the result of John Wayne trying to help the troubled actress one more time.

Producer: John Wayne
Director: James Edward Grant
Screenplay: James Edward Grant
Cinematography: Archie Stout
Film Editing: Harry Keller
Art Direction: John McCarthy Jr., Charles S. Thompson
Music: Richard Hageman
Cast: John Wayne (Quirt Evans), Gail Russell (Penelope Worth), Harry Carey (Territorial Marshal Wistful McClintock), Bruce Cabot (Laredo Stevens), Irene Rich (Mrs. Worth), Lee Dixon (Randy McCall).
BW-100m.

by Jeremy Arnold

Angel and the Badman

By 1946, Wayne had been a contract actor at Republic Studios for 8 years. He enjoyed working there but desired more control over his films and his roles, so he told studio chief Herbert Yates that he wanted to produce a movie himself. Yates, fearful of losing Wayne to the bigger studios, gave the actor his chance, and the result was Angel and the Badman (1947), a modest Western about a gunman torn between violence and the Quaker girl he falls in love with. A mystical story, especially for Wayne, the film turned out well but was not a big hit. The Duke's fans probably found it too lacking in action. The script had been written by James Edward Grant, who had never written for Wayne before but whose work the Duke greatly admired. Grant had also never directed before and was anxious to try so Wayne gave him a shot. (Grant would only direct once more, the 1954 Ring of Fear, though he continued to collaborate with Wayne as a screenwriter until he died in 1966.) Wayne made sure the rest of the cast and crew were filled with top talent which included himself, Harry Carey and Gail Russell, a ravishing brunette beauty from Paramount Pictures. Legendary stuntman Yakima Canutt came aboard as stunt coordinator and 2nd-unit director, and Archie Stout was hired as the director of photography. Stout was a true Hollywood veteran with over 100 features to his credit, many of them low-budget Monogram Westerns. By the time he retired in 1954, he had photographed Wayne in 27 pictures. (Stout also won a cinematography Oscar for his 2nd-unit work on The Quiet Man (1952), to this day the only Oscar awarded to a 2nd-unit D.P.) Wayne had recently married Esperanza 'Chata' Baur, and his new workload as producer didn't sit too well with her. She later complained, "He talks of {business} constantly. When he reads, it's scripts. Our dinner guests always talk business, and he spends all his time working, discussing work, or planning work." Chata also grew convinced that Wayne and Gail Russell were having an affair. Wayne vehemently denied this. He had, however, taken a great interest in the young, troubled actress, listening to her problems and offering advice. Russell was not only notoriously shy and fearful of the camera but also of the entire Hollywood machine and her rising success in it. She had been discovered while still in high school and placed into the star system by Paramount despite her total lack of acting experience - and with the pressing of her mother, who herself had always wanted to be an actress. "Everything happened so fast," Russell said. "I was going to Santa Monica High and the next thing I knew I was being groomed for a picture." She turned to alcohol to calm herself on sets, and over time gradually succumbed to alcoholism, dying of the disease in 1961, at age 36. As her career and life deteriorated, Wayne continued to help her and give her roles when he could. Russell appreciated the interest, later saying of Wayne: "The one word that defines Duke is 'honest.' He's an honest man. He can't be otherwise." Wayne went on to produce 20 films (some uncredited), including two of director Budd Boetticher's best pictures: Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Seven Men From Now (1956), the latter of which featured Gail Russell in one of her final roles - the result of John Wayne trying to help the troubled actress one more time. Producer: John Wayne Director: James Edward Grant Screenplay: James Edward Grant Cinematography: Archie Stout Film Editing: Harry Keller Art Direction: John McCarthy Jr., Charles S. Thompson Music: Richard Hageman Cast: John Wayne (Quirt Evans), Gail Russell (Penelope Worth), Harry Carey (Territorial Marshal Wistful McClintock), Bruce Cabot (Laredo Stevens), Irene Rich (Mrs. Worth), Lee Dixon (Randy McCall). BW-100m. by Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

I thought you weren't allowed to work on Sunday.
- Quirt Evans
Oh, Quirt, there's nothing we're not allowed to do. It's just that we don't believe in doing what we know is wrong.
- Penelope Worth
Well, that makes it pretty much each fella's own guess.
- Quirt Evans
But each fella knows inside.
- Penelope Worth
Well, there's a lot of gents I wouldn't want to give that much leeway to.
- Quirt Evans
But of course if you're determined to watch over him, Penny, you'd better take a pencil and paper with you. His first conscious words should be recorded. They may be of great interest to history...or more possibly the United States Marshal! Who knows what violence is involved with his battered frame and his bullet holes.
- Dr. Mangrum
So that's Quirt Evans. He's quite a man with the gals. He's closed the eyes of many men...and opened the eyes of many women.
- Bradley
Surely you can walk to the barn without that!
- Penelope Worth
What?
- Quirt Evans
The gun!
- Penelope Worth
Oh, well, it balances me. One leg is longer than the other. You know, the weight.
- Quirt Evans
Only a man that carries a gun ever needs one.
- Territorial Marshal Wistful McClintock

Trivia

Notes

The working title for this film was Angel and the Outlaw. Modern sources also include The Gun as a working title. James Edward Grant's onscreen credit reads: "Written and directed by James Edward Grant." Angel and the Badman was the first feature produced by John Wayne's production company, Patnel Productions. It also marked Wayne's first producing effort for Repulic. According to Wayne's biography, Herbert Yates, the head of the studio, made Wayne a producer to prevent him from being courted by other studios. Wayne went on to produce the 1949 film The Fighting Kentuckian (see below) for Republic. While reviews and CBCS list Gail Russell's character name as "Prudence," she is called "Penelope" or "Penny" in the film. Russell was borrowed from Paramount to appear in this picture. According to Hollywood Reporter news items, location shooting was conducted at Flagstaff and Sedona, AZ and at Monument Valley, UT.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 15, 1947

Released in United States Winter February 15, 1947