The Specialist


1h 50m 1994

Brief Synopsis

Set in contemporary Miami, an explosives expert helps a seductive beauty avenge the murder of her parents, teaming up against a formidable trio of villains: a powerful Cuban-American crime boss, his son, and their merciless hit man.

Film Details

Also Known As
El especialista, O Especialista, Specialist, Specialisten, expert
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Tennessee, USA; Miami, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Synopsis

Set in contemporary Miami, an explosives expert helps a seductive beauty avenge the murder of her parents, teaming up against a formidable trio of villains: a powerful Cuban-American crime boss, his son, and their merciless hit man.

Crew

Paul Abascal

Hair Stylist

Brad Anderson

Costumes

Bob Apisa

Stunts

Giorgio Armani

Wardrobe

Mark Ashley

Assistant

Steve Barron

Executive Producer

John Barry

Music

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Artist

Chick Bernhardt

Stunts

Chuck Binder

Executive Producer

Barbara Boguski

Adr Editor

Carl Boles

Rigging Gaffer

Butch Brickell

Stunts

Al Broussard

Special Effects

Carole Brown-james

Costume Supervisor

Ricou Browning

Other

Jackie Burch

Casting

Harold Burns

Stunts

Brian Callier

Graphics

David E Campbell

Rerecording

Christopher S Capp

Assistant Editor

Paul Carden

Dialogue Editor

Curtis Carlin

Props

Andrew Castillo

Stunts

Kevin Cerchiai

Other

Michael Charboneau

Foreman

Maria K. Chavez

Location Manager

Mickey Ciarfalio

Stunts

Harold Collins

Construction Coordinator

Gary Compton

Stunts

Donald Conner

Special Effects

Sheri Davidson

Assistant

Thomas A Davila

Production Accountant

Zack Davis

Adr Editor

Mark Deallessandro

Stunts

Dan Delgado

Lighting Technician

Dennis Deveaugh

Stunts

Timothy Dunford

Assistant Camera Operator

Scott Eddo

Makeup Artist

Alex Edlin

Stunts

Mike Edmonson

Special Effects

Susan Ekins

Associate Producer

Martin Elfalan

Assistant Production Accountant

Gary J Engel

Assistant

Victor Ennis

Assistant Sound Editor

Emilio Estefan

Music Supervisor

Nayib Estefan

Assistant

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Julie Feiner

Foley Editor

Fred Fontana

Production Supervisor

Bobby J Foxworth

Stunts

Mike Franz

Lighting

Jenny Fulle

Other

John E Gallagher

Assistant Director

Lex Geddings

Stunts

Mickey Giacomazzi

Stunts

Ben Gibbs

Other

Tom Gibson

Best Boy Grip

Mark S Gordon

Sound Effects Editor

Ken Gorrell

Special Effects

Clif Gotthelf

Foley Mixer

Allan Graf

Unit Director

Allan Graf

Stunt Coordinator

Kim Haggerty

Assistant

Kristine Harlin

Assistant

Bill Harrison

Special Effects

Dan Hegeman

Dialogue Editor

Mo Henry

Negative Cutting

Jack Hofstra

Editor

Scott Jacobson

Set Decorator

Kent James

Costume Supervisor

Audrey A Johnson

Assistant Property Master

Cheryl Johnson

Other

Kent Johnson

Property Master

Karin Joy

Other

A Kalani

Stunts

Donna Karan

Wardrobe

Jeffrey L Kimball

Dp/Cinematographer

Jeffrey L Kimball

Director Of Photography

Marion Kirk

Costumes

John Kockelman

Stunts

Neil Krepela

Other

Elizabeth Tobin Kurtz

Assistant Sound Editor

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Donna Langston

Other

Steve Laporte

Makeup

Joyce M Lark

Transportation Captain

Peter J Lehman

Sound Effects Editor

Lynn Leonhard

Assistant Editor

Sidney Liufau

Stunts

Kevin Long

Props

Joseph E Lotito

Assistant Director

R J Louis

Coproducer

R J Louis

Unit Production Manager

Greg Lundsgaard

Camera Operator

Marc Macaulay

Stunts

Dennis Maguire

Assistant Director

Judianna Makovsky

Costume Designer

Mollie Mallinger-helfand

Assistant Camera Operator

Kathy Marshall

Stunts

Walter P Martishius

Production Designer

Brian Mcpherson

Sound Effects Editor

Elizabeth Mersky

Other

Hans Metz

Special Effects Supervisor

James A. Miller

Rigging Gaffer

Helen Monaghan

Costumes

Dick Montagne

Assistant Camera Operator

Glenn T Morgan

Sound Effects Editor

David Moritz

Foley Editor

Jeff Most

Executive Producer

Tony Munafo

Associate Producer

Alan Muraoka

Art Director

Shawn Murphy

Music

Ashley Nolan

Assistant

Marshall J Nord

Production Associate

Michael O'shea

Director Of Photography

Michael O'shea

Dp/Cinematographer

Mark Ormandy

Audio

Edward V Pannozzo

Assistant

Pedro Pablo Pena

Choreographer

Ron Phillips

Photography

Clay Pinney

Special Effects Coordinator

J Michael Popovich

Key Grip

Bernard Presock

Assistant

Bob Putynkowski

Color Timer

Manny Ramirez

Stunts

Gwyne Redner

Hair Stylist

John T Reitz

Rerecording

John Rice

Assistant Sound Editor

Steven Riley

Special Effects

Greig Mc Ritchie

Original Music

Dan Romero

Transportation Coordinator

Katie Rowe

Foley Artist

Gregg Rudloff

Rerecording

Mike Rumain

Stunts

Sean Rush

Boom Operator

Gaston Santiso

Assistant Editor

Tricia Sawyer

Makeup Artist

Brad Scheel

Assistant

Greg Schmidt

Assistant Camera Operator

Richard Scioli

Special Effects

Michael Scott

Camera Operator

Peggy Semtob

Hair Stylist

Alexandra Seros

Screenplay

Christopher Sheldon

Sound Effects Editor

Barbara Shiff

Costumes

John Shirley

Other

Joanne Small

Script Supervisor

Frank Smathers

Dialogue Editor

Peter Sobich

Other

Scott Sohan

Other

Gar Stephens

Stunts

Mark P. Stoeckinger

Sound Editor

Stan Storc

Transportation Captain

Larry Sweet

Dolly Grip

Kevin King Templeton

Assistant

Nancy Tracy

Foley Editor

Victor Valiente

Costumes

Ariel Velasco Shaw

Other

Bill Voigtlander

Adr Supervisor

Jamie Weintraub

Assistant

Jerry Weintraub

Producer

Jody Weintraub

Assistant

Joseph Weintraub

Assistant

Julie Weintraub

Assistant

Rachel Weintraub

Assistant

Sarah Weintraub

Assistant

Jeff Winn

Stunts

Jeff Winn

Craft Service

Andy Wiskes

Sound Mixer

Scott Workman

Stunts

John Zimmerman

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
El especialista, O Especialista, Specialist, Specialisten, expert
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Tennessee, USA; Miami, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 7, 1994

Released in United States on Video March 21, 1995

Began shooting March 2, 1994.

Completed shooting May 8, 1994.

Steven Seagal, Mel Gibson and Wesley Snipes were all once mentioned for the lead.

Released in United States on Video March 21, 1995

Released in United States Fall October 7, 1994