The Client


2h 4m 1994

Brief Synopsis

A young boy witnesses the suicide of a lawyer whose client is in the mob, and a female attorney tries to protect him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Client, Klienten
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Memphis, Tennessee, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 4m

Synopsis

A young boy witnesses the suicide of a lawyer whose client is in the mob, and a female attorney tries to protect him.

Crew

Mary Arnold

Assistant Production Coordinator

Mae Boren Axton

Song

Benjamin Ballard

Production Assistant

Paul Barbarin

Song

Shauna Beal

Assistant

Yudi Bennett

Assistant Director

Cydney Bernard

Production Supervisor

Jennifer Blair

Other

Richard L Blankenship

Construction Coordinator

Lisa Joi Bloch

Production Assistant

Kim Bonham

Animal Wrangler

Cameron Brown

Apprentice

Robert Brown

Editor

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Edward Cass

Production Assistant

Bobby Jo Cawley

Transportation Coordinator

James S Cawley

Stunts

Drew Clarke

Craft Service

Mike Cody

Technical Advisor

Michael J Cohen

Assistant Camera Operator

Joseph T Conway

On-Set Dresser

Mark Deallessandro

Stunts

Jo Doster

Local Casting

David Dunlap

Camera Operator

Tommy Durden

Song

Jerry Edemann

Assistant Sound Editor

Lou Edemann

Sound Editor

Scott Elias

Location Manager

James C. Feng

Assistant Art Director

William Joe Ferguson

Other

Guy Ferland

Associate Producer

Ingrid Ferrin

Costume Designer

Mali Finn

Casting

Glory Fioramonti

Stunt Coordinator

Glory Fioramonti

Stunts

Larry Fioritto

Special Effects Coordinator

Carl Fischer

Boom Operator

Bart Flaherty

Dolly Grip

Tim Flattery

Visual Effects

William Floyd

Assistant Camera Operator

David Craig Forrest

Makeup Artist

Nicole Furia

Production Accountant

Barbara Gaddy-edrington

Animal Wrangler

Joseph E Gallagher

Assistant Camera Operator

Lenny Geschke

Sound Editor

Robert Getchell

Screenplay

Thomas Gilbert

On-Set Dresser

Akiva Goldsman

Screenplay

Phil Goldstein

Other

Bob Gorelick

Steadicam Operator

John Grisham

Source Material (From Novel)

John Grisham

Source Material

Gloria B Hancock

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jeff Hand

Assistant Camera Operator

W. C. Handy

Song

Sean Herlihy

Assistant Camera Operator

Julia Hickman

Art Department Coordinator

Gavin Hitt

Assistant

Petur Hliddal

Sound Mixer

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Evelyn Hokanson

Adr Mixer

Brenda Holder

Other

Nancy Hopton

Script Supervisor

Andrea Horta

Adr Editor

Sean Hubbert

Assistant Editor

Rachel Hudgins

Assistant

D Blake Huff

Foreman

Al Jacques

Other

Joe Janusek

Key Grip

Adam Jenkins

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Chris Jenkins

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Nils C Jensen

Sound Editor

P. Michael Johnston

Art Director

Stephen Johnstone

Lighting

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Mark Kazanoff

Song

Henry Kingi

Stunts

Gary Kover

Camera Operator

Pamela Sue Kuri

Assistant Director

Mary Jo Lang

Foley Mixer

Laura L Lawson

Other

Chet Leonard

Other

Michael E Listorti

Dolly Grip

Angie Luckey

Assistant Sound Editor

Jim Makiej

Music

Don Malouf

Sound Editor

Brian D Manis

Production Assistant

Larry Markart

Video Assist/Playback

Alan Martin

Set Costumer

Wes Mattox

Special Effects

Jill Maxcy

Production Assistant

John R Mcaleer

Assistant Camera Operator

Stan Mcclain

Aerial Director Of Photography

Anne Mcculley

Set Decorator

Mary Mccusker

Advisor

Patrick Mcdill

Assistant

Mary Mclaglen

Unit Production Manager

Mary Mclaglen

Coproducer

Bill Mclaren

Transportation Co-Captain

Anna Mewbourne

Assistant Location Manager

Rhona Meyers

Assistant Costume Designer

Lydia Milars

Makeup Artist

Arnon Milchan

Producer

Tim Monich

Dialect Coach

Joe Montelongo

Special Makeup Effects

Belita Moreno

Advisor

Kyle Morgan

Stunts

Lori Lynn Moss

Stunts

Gary Mundheim

Sound Editor

Patrick Murray

Lighting Technician

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Mel Neiman

Other

Kris Nielsen

Production Coordinator

Brian Osmond

Assistant Camera Operator

Rita Parillo

Hair Stylist

Stanley Pasay

Other

Tony Pierce-roberts

Dp/Cinematographer

Tony Pierce-roberts

Director Of Photography

Elvis Presley

Song

Andrea Rapke

Production Assistant

Leroy Reed

Transportation Captain

Leroy Reed

Stunts

Patty Reid

Assistant

Steven Reuther

Producer

John Richards

Other

Marie-ange Ripka

Hair Stylist

John Roesch

Foley

Pattye Rogers

Assistant Editor

Rod Rogers

Adr

Bettina Rose

Assistant

Bruno Rubeo

Production Designer

Mayes C. Rubeo

Costume Supervisor

Katherine Ruppe

Assistant Camera Operator

Emily Schweber

Casting Associate

Ellen Segal

Music Editor

Howard Shore

Music

Howard Shore

Music Arranger

Howard Shore

Music Conductor

Daniel Silverberg

Assistant Director

Larry Singer

Adr Supervisor

Mark Smith

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Richard C Smock

Rigging Gaffer

Joanie Spates

Assistant Production Accountant

Susan Thomas

Craft Service

Demmie Todd

Photography

David Touster

Property Master

James F. Truesdale

Assistant Art Director

Christina Tucker

Adr Mixer

Steve Tyrell

Song

Steve Tyrell

Song Performer

Chris Ubick

Assistant Property Master

Robert Wagner

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Wagner

Director Of Photography

Stephanie Waldron

Other

David Weathers

On-Set Dresser

Randy Westgate

Special Makeup Effects

Michael Zansky

Scenic Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
Client, Klienten
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Memphis, Tennessee, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 4m

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1994
Susan Sarandon

Articles

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 20, 1994

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 2-11, 1994.)

Nominated for the 1994 British Academy of Film & Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress (Susan Sarandon).

Released in United States on Video June 27, 1995

Released in United States September 1994

Released in United States Summer July 20, 1994

Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 2-11, 1994.

Rights to Grisham's novel were purchased for a reported $2.5 million dollars.

Began shooting July 6, 1993.

Completed shooting September 27, 1993.

Released in United States on Video June 27, 1995