Beneath the Planet of the Apes


1h 34m 1970
Beneath the Planet of the Apes

Brief Synopsis

The sole survivor of an interplanetary rescue mission discovers a planet ruled by apes and an underground city run by telekinetic humans.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Sequel
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 26 May 1970
Production Company
Apjac Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Pierre Boulle.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Taylor, an astronaut, has crashlanded on an unknown planet. Having escaped from his captors--uniformed gorillas on horseback--Taylor, accompanied by his mute female companion Nova, is riding on horseback over a wasteland, an area feared by the apes as the "forbidden zone," when he encounters the remnants of the Statue of Liberty, half buried in the sand, and he realizes that his 20th-century world has been destroyed. Suddenly the earth splits before them, and Taylor vanishes into the rock formation after telling Nova to return to Zira, a scientist and one of the friendly apes who helped them escape. En route Nova meets another astronaut, Brent, who has been sent to find Taylor, and takes him to Taylor's friends in the city of the apes. They are captured after learning that the militaristic apes plan to destroy the remaining life in the forbidden zone. Zira helps Brent and Nova escape into the forbidden zone, and there they stumble onto the subterranean ruins of New York City. The labyrinth is populated by human beings, 40th-century mutations who conceal their disfigurations with masks, worship a live atom bomb, and communicate telepathically. Brent is captured, interrogated about the planned ape attack, and thrown into a cell with Taylor. Their guard orders them by telepathy to kill each other, but Nova interrupts the guard's thought, and in the ensuing respite, Taylor and Brent overpower the guard. Meanwhile, the apes attack the city, in spite of the mutants' attempts to repel them. Brent and Taylor try to prevent the detonation of the atom bomb, which they realize is a doomsday machine capable of destroying the world. Nova is killed, along with the mutants' leader. Taylor is shot; Brent is killed; and, seeing that the apes can easily win, Taylor presses the button which releases the bomb.

Photo Collections

Beneath the Planet of the Apes - Novelization
Here is the Bantam novelization of Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) by Michael Avallone.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Sequel
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 26 May 1970
Production Company
Apjac Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on characters created by Pierre Boulle.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Beneath the Planet of the Apes


Unconvinced of the necessity for a sequel to Planet of the Apes (1968), actor Charlton Heston agreed to appear in Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) with the caveat that his character - wayward Earth astronaut George Taylor, last spokesman for the human race in a future world governed by simians - be killed in the first scene. Not surprisingly, executives at 20th Century Fox choked at the concept but in reality Taylor's death had always been on the table, even as early as preproduction for the original film. In one draft of the screenplay signed by Rod Serling, Taylor met his doom when shot by a gorilla sniper at the base of the ruined Statue of Liberty. This bleak finish was carried over from the Serling draft to Michael Wilson's initial rewrites but dropped prior to the start of principal photography in the spring of 1967. In a series of treatments and drafts for Beneath the Planet of the Apes -- known in preproduction as Planet of the Apes Revisited -- contributed by a cadre of writers (among them Serling and even source novelist Pierre Boulle), Taylor lived and died alternatively, boldly fathering a new race of human-ape crossbreeds or piloting a spaceship kamikaze-style into Ape City, thus triggering a nuclear warhead, forever stopping the madness.

In the end, a compromise was struck: Heston's performance would frame the central narrative of Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), allowing his participation to urge a sense of continuity in the opening scenes and then granting his death wish in the closing frames. The final screenplay was authored by associate producer Mort Abrahams (the sequel's driving force) and novelist/poet Paul Dehn, author of a volume of apocalyptic verse for children. Sharing Heston's apprehension about the sequel was his Planet of the Apes costar Kim Hunter, who saw little to work with in the shooting script, her role of sympathetic chimpanzee scientist Dr. Zira reduced to a cameo. Worse for her, Hunter's scene partner, Roddy McDowall, was unavailable, off as he was in Scotland directing the supernatural thriller Tam Lin (aka The Devil's Widow, 1970) with Ava Gardner. Slotted in as McDowall's surrogate was reasonable sound-alike David Watson (who had, interestingly enough, played a singing Robin Hood for NBC-TV in a 1968 Emmy-nominated musical that featured McDowall as Prince John). To carry the narrative in Heston's absence, James Franciscus was brought in as newly-arrived astronaut Brent, a role refused by Burt Reynolds. Franciscus had just played a NASA scientist in John Sturges' Marooned (1969) and actually reworked much of his own dialogue for Beneath the Planet of the Apes.

Despite the wealth reaped by 20th Century Fox with the release of Planet of the Apes, crafting the sequel was very much a scaled down affair as cameras rolled in February 1969. The budget for Beneath the Planet of the Apes was half that of the original, with the studio smarting over losses incurred by such extravagant flops as Star! (1968) and Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) and finding economy in the reuse of standing sets and costumes. (Charlton Heston donated his entire SAG minimum salary to his son Frazer's preparatory school.) In truth, Beneath the Planet of the Apes feels cheap and downcast throughout until the narrative shifts to the cellar of the Forbidden Zone, where Brent and Linda Harrison's mute Nova discover the remnants of a long ago submerged New York City, where midtown's St. Patrick's Cathedral and downtown's stock exchange are smooshed together in a post-atomic congealment. Though the Forbidden Zone provides a ghoulishly fascinating backdrop for the sequel's best scenes (including Heston's third act return to the story), even these represented the redressing of existing sets from Hello, Dolly! (1969) and TV's The Time Tunnel. Cutting back an initially higher budget of $5 million cost the film its original director, Don Medford, who was swapped out by the more amenable journeyman Ted Post.

Despite its obvious lack of wherewithal, Beneath the Planet of the Apes landed another solid gutpunch to American moviegoers, strengthening themes fostered by the original film and seeing them through to their inevitably grim conclusion. The film's final setpiece, a triangulation of violence between man, ape, and mutants sired in the belly of the apocalyptic beast, offers a strange echo of the climax of David Lean's The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), which shared a source novelist in Frenchman Pierre Boulle, and whose film adaptor Michael Wilson was a contributor to the shooting script of Planet of the Apes. As in the Lean film, two protagonists make a desperate run on an enemy encampment with an aim toward strategic destruction (here a doomsday bomb rather than a railroad trestle) and die graphically in the effort, leading to a climactic sense of futility. The horrors of war telegraphed by Bridge on the River Kwai are taken all the way in Beneath the Planet of the Apes, which wipes the slate clean by dint of an Armageddon triggered by the dying Heston (suffering the first of several Christ-like demises in 70s sci-fi cinema). The sequel's final frames (accompanied by Paul Frees' solemn epitaph) represented one of the most horrific fadeouts ever approved for general audiences. As end titles rolled, reluctant star Charlton Heston's wish had been granted at last... but of course this was only the beginning.

By Richard Harland Smith

Sources:
Planet of the Apes Revisited: The Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Classic Science Fiction Saga by Joe Russo and Larry Landsman, with Edward Gross (MacMillian, 2001)
Timeline of the Planet of the Apes: The Definitive Chronology by Rich Handley (Hasslein Books, 2009)
Planet of the Apes: An Unofficial Companion by David Hofstede (ECW Press, 2001)
Planet of the Apes as American Myth: Race and Politics in the Films and Television Series by Eric Greene (McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 1996)
Beneath The Planet Of The Apes

Beneath the Planet of the Apes

Unconvinced of the necessity for a sequel to Planet of the Apes (1968), actor Charlton Heston agreed to appear in Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) with the caveat that his character - wayward Earth astronaut George Taylor, last spokesman for the human race in a future world governed by simians - be killed in the first scene. Not surprisingly, executives at 20th Century Fox choked at the concept but in reality Taylor's death had always been on the table, even as early as preproduction for the original film. In one draft of the screenplay signed by Rod Serling, Taylor met his doom when shot by a gorilla sniper at the base of the ruined Statue of Liberty. This bleak finish was carried over from the Serling draft to Michael Wilson's initial rewrites but dropped prior to the start of principal photography in the spring of 1967. In a series of treatments and drafts for Beneath the Planet of the Apes -- known in preproduction as Planet of the Apes Revisited -- contributed by a cadre of writers (among them Serling and even source novelist Pierre Boulle), Taylor lived and died alternatively, boldly fathering a new race of human-ape crossbreeds or piloting a spaceship kamikaze-style into Ape City, thus triggering a nuclear warhead, forever stopping the madness. In the end, a compromise was struck: Heston's performance would frame the central narrative of Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), allowing his participation to urge a sense of continuity in the opening scenes and then granting his death wish in the closing frames. The final screenplay was authored by associate producer Mort Abrahams (the sequel's driving force) and novelist/poet Paul Dehn, author of a volume of apocalyptic verse for children. Sharing Heston's apprehension about the sequel was his Planet of the Apes costar Kim Hunter, who saw little to work with in the shooting script, her role of sympathetic chimpanzee scientist Dr. Zira reduced to a cameo. Worse for her, Hunter's scene partner, Roddy McDowall, was unavailable, off as he was in Scotland directing the supernatural thriller Tam Lin (aka The Devil's Widow, 1970) with Ava Gardner. Slotted in as McDowall's surrogate was reasonable sound-alike David Watson (who had, interestingly enough, played a singing Robin Hood for NBC-TV in a 1968 Emmy-nominated musical that featured McDowall as Prince John). To carry the narrative in Heston's absence, James Franciscus was brought in as newly-arrived astronaut Brent, a role refused by Burt Reynolds. Franciscus had just played a NASA scientist in John Sturges' Marooned (1969) and actually reworked much of his own dialogue for Beneath the Planet of the Apes. Despite the wealth reaped by 20th Century Fox with the release of Planet of the Apes, crafting the sequel was very much a scaled down affair as cameras rolled in February 1969. The budget for Beneath the Planet of the Apes was half that of the original, with the studio smarting over losses incurred by such extravagant flops as Star! (1968) and Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) and finding economy in the reuse of standing sets and costumes. (Charlton Heston donated his entire SAG minimum salary to his son Frazer's preparatory school.) In truth, Beneath the Planet of the Apes feels cheap and downcast throughout until the narrative shifts to the cellar of the Forbidden Zone, where Brent and Linda Harrison's mute Nova discover the remnants of a long ago submerged New York City, where midtown's St. Patrick's Cathedral and downtown's stock exchange are smooshed together in a post-atomic congealment. Though the Forbidden Zone provides a ghoulishly fascinating backdrop for the sequel's best scenes (including Heston's third act return to the story), even these represented the redressing of existing sets from Hello, Dolly! (1969) and TV's The Time Tunnel. Cutting back an initially higher budget of $5 million cost the film its original director, Don Medford, who was swapped out by the more amenable journeyman Ted Post. Despite its obvious lack of wherewithal, Beneath the Planet of the Apes landed another solid gutpunch to American moviegoers, strengthening themes fostered by the original film and seeing them through to their inevitably grim conclusion. The film's final setpiece, a triangulation of violence between man, ape, and mutants sired in the belly of the apocalyptic beast, offers a strange echo of the climax of David Lean's The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), which shared a source novelist in Frenchman Pierre Boulle, and whose film adaptor Michael Wilson was a contributor to the shooting script of Planet of the Apes. As in the Lean film, two protagonists make a desperate run on an enemy encampment with an aim toward strategic destruction (here a doomsday bomb rather than a railroad trestle) and die graphically in the effort, leading to a climactic sense of futility. The horrors of war telegraphed by Bridge on the River Kwai are taken all the way in Beneath the Planet of the Apes, which wipes the slate clean by dint of an Armageddon triggered by the dying Heston (suffering the first of several Christ-like demises in 70s sci-fi cinema). The sequel's final frames (accompanied by Paul Frees' solemn epitaph) represented one of the most horrific fadeouts ever approved for general audiences. As end titles rolled, reluctant star Charlton Heston's wish had been granted at last... but of course this was only the beginning. By Richard Harland Smith Sources: Planet of the Apes Revisited: The Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Classic Science Fiction Saga by Joe Russo and Larry Landsman, with Edward Gross (MacMillian, 2001) Timeline of the Planet of the Apes: The Definitive Chronology by Rich Handley (Hasslein Books, 2009) Planet of the Apes: An Unofficial Companion by David Hofstede (ECW Press, 2001) Planet of the Apes as American Myth: Race and Politics in the Films and Television Series by Eric Greene (McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 1996)

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter


KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002

Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79.

Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York.

She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946).

Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations.

Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett.

By Michael T. Toole

TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002

Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989.

KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002

The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas."

Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993).

Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry.

Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia.

By Lang Thompson

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter

KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002 Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79. Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York. She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946). Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations. Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett. By Michael T. Toole TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002 Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989. KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002 The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas." Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993). Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry. Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

You ask me to help you? Man is evil! Capable of nothing but destruction!
- Dr. Zaius
They will dissect you! And they will kill you! In that order!
- Cornelius
The only good human... is a DEAD human!
- Ursus
If you are caught by the gorillas, you must remember one thing.
- Cornelius
What's that?
- John Brent
Never to speak!
- Cornelius
What the hell would I have to say to a gorilla?
- John Brent
Gorillas are cruel because they're stupid! All bone and no brain!
- Dr. Zira

Trivia

The only film in the original series of five that does not star Roddy McDowall.

The final scene where Taylor hangs onto the detonator by his fingers is an elaborate reference to a scene from 'Lang, Fritz' 's Metropolis (1927) where a worker collapses in the factory in a similar fashion.

Roddy McDowall was unable to appear in this film because he was committed to another project. He can, however, be spotted briefly in the opening prologue, even though another actor plays the role later in the film.

'Reynolds, Burt' was considered the lead role of John Brent.

'Wells, Orson' was offered the role of General Ursus which he turned down.

Notes

This picture was the second in the "Planet of the Apes" series and was the only one of the five films that did not star Roddy McDowall. For more information about the series, please consult the entry below for Planet of the Apes.

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted One of the Year's Ten Best English-language Films by the 1968 National Board of Review.

Released in United States June 1970

Released in United States Summer May 26, 1970

Re-released in United States on Video August 11, 1998

Sequel to PLANET OF THE APES (1968) directed by Franklin J Schaffner.

Released in United States Summer May 26, 1970

Released in United States June 1970

Re-released in United States on Video August 11, 1998

1998 Video re-release is restored, remastered and THX certified.

1998 Video re-release is restored, remastered, and THX certified.

Re-released on video in USA August 11, 1998.

Released in USA on video.

Selected in 2001 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.