Godzilla vs. The Thing


1h 30m 1964
Godzilla vs. The Thing

Brief Synopsis

An unscrupulous land developer drives both Mothra and Godzilla to attack Tokyo.

Film Details

Also Known As
Godzilla tai Mothra, Gojira tai Mosura, Godzilla vs. The Thing
Genre
Action
Horror
Foreign
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1964
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

A gigantic egg appears on the shore as the monster Godzilla rises out of the mud in the aftermath of a typhoon off the coast of Japan. Tiny twin girls then appear, carried from their nearby radioactive atomic island by Mothra (The Thing) to retrieve their egg. Unable to persuade local promoters, who envision the egg as a major tourist attraction, to let them carry it off, the twins and Mothra return home emptyhanded. Godzilla, meanwhile, is on the rampage; and a local scientist, a photographer, and a reporter enlist the aid of Mothra, who is no match for Godzilla and soon dies. Mothra, however, has hatched the egg, and two enormous caterpillars emerge to envelop the monster in their sticky fluid. Godzilla topples from a cliff to his death in the sea below.

Videos

Movie Clip

Mothra Vs. Godzilla (1964) - Could This Egg Be Dangerous? The day after a typhoon, now a huge egg has washed ashore, so reporter Ichiro (Akira Takarada) and photographer Junko (Yuriko Hoshi) waylay Professor Miura (Hiroshi Koizumi) who’s been called in to investigate before a nutty entrepreneur guy (Yoshifumi Tajima as Kumuyama) intervenes, early in Mothra Vs. Godzilla, 1964.
Mothra Vs. Godzilla (1964) - Godzilla, The Atomic Monster There’s still no explanation for the radioactive readings near the typhoon-damaged coast and reporter Ichiro (Akira Takarada) is about to agree it’s no big deal when his partner photographer Junko (Yuriko Hoshi) sees the problem, in Toho Films’ Mothra Vs. Godzilla, 1964.
Mothra Vs. Godzilla (1964) - Mothra Asks For Your Help, Too! The professor (Hiroshi Koizumi) is explaining to newsman Ichiro (Akira Takarada) about the crooked business guys and thinks Junko (Yuriko Hoshi) is interrupting but it’s really the tiny “Peanuts,” (the singing pop-star twins Emi and Yumi Ito, who had been a sensation in their first movie appearance in the original Mothra 1962) now providing their whole back-story about the giant egg, and its (title character) mommy, in Mothra Vs. Godzilla, 1964.
Mothra Vs. Godzilla (1964) - Beauty Amid Utter Destruction After a cracking (if miniature) opening with a typhoon wrecking a coastal reclamation project, the aftermath with Yuriko Hoshi as a news photographer, Akira Takarada her annoyed reporter colleague, and Kenzo Tadake a craven local politician, in the fourth feature in the Toho Films franchise, Mothra Vs. Godzilla, 1964.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Godzilla tai Mothra, Gojira tai Mosura, Godzilla vs. The Thing
Genre
Action
Horror
Foreign
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1964
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Mothra vs. Godzilla


In 1954, Ishirô Honda's Godzilla was a huge commercial success for Japan's Toho studios, prompting them to produce more films in what has become one of the most popular and iconic cult film franchises ever created. In 1955, Toho followed-up the success of Godzilla with the first sequel, Godzilla Raids Again, directed by Motoyoshi Oda. Seven years later, Ishirô Honda returned to the franchise, directing the next four films (he directed eight Godzilla films in all), including two films that feature Godzilla in a showdown with two other iconic movie monsters: 1962's King Kong vs. Godzilla and Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)--the latter Godzilla opponent making its debut in Mothra (1961), also directed by Ishirô Honda and the start of another popular Kaiju franchise for Toho.

Each Godzilla film features serious political and moral themes that unfortunately often get lost today because of the campy visual and special effects. In the case of Mothra vs. Godzilla, audiences are warned of the potential destruction of humanity at the hands of greed, nuclear war and immorality--a potent lesson to be learned in the years following the end of World War II and the start of the Cold War.

While many of Toho's early kaiju films, including the Godzilla and Mothra series, are suitable for general audiences by today's standards, that was not always the case. During the pre-production of Mothra vs. Godzilla, Toho made it abundantly clear that they wanted to make a film that would appeal to everyone, including children. Director Ishirô Honda agreed with the need to widen the appeal for general audiences, particularly with the increasing competition for theatrical films from the rising popularity of televisions in the home.

For his fourth outing as the terrorizing Godzilla, Haruo Nakajima, who played the role in 12 films from 1954 to 1972, worked with special effects artist and costume designer Teizo Toshimitsu to construct a new Godzilla suit that was much lighter and allowed for more movement than previous iterations of the costume. In addition to Nakajima's work as Godzilla, the special effects team also created elaborate motorized puppets for both Godzilla and Mothra. Nakajima was a master props performer and a staple of many Kaiju films, including his performances in Rodan (1956), as Moguera in The Mysterians (1957), Mothra and King Kong in King Kong Escapes (1967). In 1972, Nakajima put on the Godzilla suit one last time for Godzilla vs. Gigan, retiring shortly thereafter.

A month after Mothra vs. Godzilla premiered in Japan, producer Henry G. Saperstein, who owned United Productions of America, purchased both the theatrical and television distribution rights to the film. Saperstein then promptly sold the rights to American International Pictures and the film premiered under the title Godzilla vs. the Thing-- the film title changed in an effort to drum up publicity and audience excitement for Godzilla's mystery opponent. Many of the Kaiju films, including the first Godzilla film, were heavily edited for American audiences with added footage and were also dubbed in English. In the case of Mothra vs. Godzilla, Toho shot extra footage solely for American distribution, but overall very few changes were made from the original version of the film. While there is certainly some historical value, nostalgia and curious interest in these edited and dubbed versions, in recent years focus has been put back on the original, un-cut releases of these movies with several home video distributors and reparatory theatres making those versions accessible to modern audiences.

Director: Ishirô Honda
Producer: Tomoyuki Tanaka and Sanezumi Fujimoto
Screenplay: Shin'ichi Sekizawa
Cinematography: Hajime Koizumi
Editing: Ryôhei Fujii
Special effects: Eiji Tsuburaya
Music: Akira Ifukube
Cast: Akira Takarada (Ichiro Sakai), Yuriko Hoshi (Junko Nakanishi), Hiroshi Koizumi (Professor Miura), Yû Fujiki (Jiro Nakamura), Kenji Sahara (Jiro Torahata), Emi Itô (Shobijin), Yumi Itô (Shobijin), Yoshifumi Tajima (Kumayama), Jun Tazaki (Murata) and Haruo Nakajima (Godzilla).
C-89m

References
The Toho Studios Story: A History and Complete Filmography by Stuart Galbraith, IV

By Jill Blake
Mothra Vs. Godzilla

Mothra vs. Godzilla

In 1954, Ishirô Honda's Godzilla was a huge commercial success for Japan's Toho studios, prompting them to produce more films in what has become one of the most popular and iconic cult film franchises ever created. In 1955, Toho followed-up the success of Godzilla with the first sequel, Godzilla Raids Again, directed by Motoyoshi Oda. Seven years later, Ishirô Honda returned to the franchise, directing the next four films (he directed eight Godzilla films in all), including two films that feature Godzilla in a showdown with two other iconic movie monsters: 1962's King Kong vs. Godzilla and Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964)--the latter Godzilla opponent making its debut in Mothra (1961), also directed by Ishirô Honda and the start of another popular Kaiju franchise for Toho. Each Godzilla film features serious political and moral themes that unfortunately often get lost today because of the campy visual and special effects. In the case of Mothra vs. Godzilla, audiences are warned of the potential destruction of humanity at the hands of greed, nuclear war and immorality--a potent lesson to be learned in the years following the end of World War II and the start of the Cold War. While many of Toho's early kaiju films, including the Godzilla and Mothra series, are suitable for general audiences by today's standards, that was not always the case. During the pre-production of Mothra vs. Godzilla, Toho made it abundantly clear that they wanted to make a film that would appeal to everyone, including children. Director Ishirô Honda agreed with the need to widen the appeal for general audiences, particularly with the increasing competition for theatrical films from the rising popularity of televisions in the home. For his fourth outing as the terrorizing Godzilla, Haruo Nakajima, who played the role in 12 films from 1954 to 1972, worked with special effects artist and costume designer Teizo Toshimitsu to construct a new Godzilla suit that was much lighter and allowed for more movement than previous iterations of the costume. In addition to Nakajima's work as Godzilla, the special effects team also created elaborate motorized puppets for both Godzilla and Mothra. Nakajima was a master props performer and a staple of many Kaiju films, including his performances in Rodan (1956), as Moguera in The Mysterians (1957), Mothra and King Kong in King Kong Escapes (1967). In 1972, Nakajima put on the Godzilla suit one last time for Godzilla vs. Gigan, retiring shortly thereafter. A month after Mothra vs. Godzilla premiered in Japan, producer Henry G. Saperstein, who owned United Productions of America, purchased both the theatrical and television distribution rights to the film. Saperstein then promptly sold the rights to American International Pictures and the film premiered under the title Godzilla vs. the Thing-- the film title changed in an effort to drum up publicity and audience excitement for Godzilla's mystery opponent. Many of the Kaiju films, including the first Godzilla film, were heavily edited for American audiences with added footage and were also dubbed in English. In the case of Mothra vs. Godzilla, Toho shot extra footage solely for American distribution, but overall very few changes were made from the original version of the film. While there is certainly some historical value, nostalgia and curious interest in these edited and dubbed versions, in recent years focus has been put back on the original, un-cut releases of these movies with several home video distributors and reparatory theatres making those versions accessible to modern audiences. Director: Ishirô Honda Producer: Tomoyuki Tanaka and Sanezumi Fujimoto Screenplay: Shin'ichi Sekizawa Cinematography: Hajime Koizumi Editing: Ryôhei Fujii Special effects: Eiji Tsuburaya Music: Akira Ifukube Cast: Akira Takarada (Ichiro Sakai), Yuriko Hoshi (Junko Nakanishi), Hiroshi Koizumi (Professor Miura), Yû Fujiki (Jiro Nakamura), Kenji Sahara (Jiro Torahata), Emi Itô (Shobijin), Yumi Itô (Shobijin), Yoshifumi Tajima (Kumayama), Jun Tazaki (Murata) and Haruo Nakajima (Godzilla). C-89m References The Toho Studios Story: A History and Complete Filmography by Stuart Galbraith, IV By Jill Blake

Quotes

"I'm not as afraid of Godzilla as I am of the editor... he's meaner."
- Reporter Jiro Nakamura

Trivia

With this film, the name of Mothra's island changes from "Beiru" to "Infant Island".

This is the final film in which Godzilla was truly evil.

Notes

Copyright length: 98 min. Released in Japan in 1964 as Gojira tai Mosura; running time: 94 min. Alternative Japanese title: Godzilla tai Mothra.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1964

Released in USA on video.

This was the fourth film featuring "Godzilla" and the third featuring "Mothra."

Tohoscope

Released in United States 1964