Charlotte's Web


1h 33m 1973

Brief Synopsis

Wilbur is a young pig living on a farm in New England who's terrified that he'll end up on the dinner table. His friend, Charlotte, is a charming spider, who comes to Wilbur's rescue. She weaves words into her web, convincing the farmer that Wilbur is a special pig, too special to kill.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Family
Musical
Release Date
Mar 1973
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc.; Sagittarius Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Synopsis

Wilbur is a young pig living on a farm in New England who's terrified that he'll end up on the dinner table. His friend, Charlotte, is a charming spider, who comes to Wilbur's rescue. She weaves words into her web, convincing the farmer that Wilbur is a special pig, too special to kill.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Family
Musical
Release Date
Mar 1973
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc.; Sagittarius Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Articles

Martha Scott, 1914-2003


Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88.

Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery.

She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade.

Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88. Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery. She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade. Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Isn't it great, that I articulate?/Isn't it grand? That you can understand/I don't snort, I don't eep, I don't even squeak or squawk/When I wanna say something, I open up and talk, I can talk, I can talk, talk, talk, I can...
- Wilbur
Would you keep it down?
- Old Sheep
I can talk.
- Wilbur
Salutations.
- Charlotte
Salu-what?
- Wilbur
Salutations.
- Charlotte
What are they? And where are you?
- Wilbur
Salutations is my fancy way of saying hello.
- Charlotte
Can I have a pig too, Pop?
- Avery Arable
I only distribute pigs to early risers, and Fern was up at daylight trying to rid the world of injustice.
- John Arable
I'm versatile.
- Charlotte
Does versatile mean full of eggs?
- Wilbur
No it means I can change with ease from one thing to the next.
- Charlotte
It would serve you right if you had an acute attack of indigestion.
- Charlotte
My stomach can handle anything.
- Templeton

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1978

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1973

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States 1978 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Special Programs - Painted Movies) April 13 - May 7, 1978.)

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1973