Spies Like Us


1h 49m 1985

Brief Synopsis

A pair of naive guys with aspirations to become government spies have their wish come true only to find out that they're being used as decoys for a real spy team.

Film Details

Also Known As
Spioner är vi allihopa
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Spy
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
England, United Kingdom; United States; Norway; Morocco

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Synopsis

A pair of naive guys with aspirations to become government spies have their wish come true only to find out that they're being used as decoys for a real spy team.

Crew

Terry Ackland-snow

Art Director

James Alexander

Song

Dan Allingham

Unit Production Manager

Dan Allingham

Production Supervisor

Rufus Andrews

Location Manager

Chic Anstiss

Camera Operator

Dan Aykroyd

Story By

Dan Aykroyd

From Story

Dan Aykroyd

Screenplay

Peter Aykroyd

Song Performer

Peter Aykroyd

Song

David Beavis

Special Effects

Leslie Belzberg

Associate Producer

Abdelkader Bouchafra

Stunts

D Boyd-phillips

Stunts

Peter Brace

Stunts

Bernie Brillstein

Executive Producer

Ken Buckle

Stunts

Marlene Butland

Production Coordinator

Terry Cade

Stunts

Sammy Cahn

Song

Ronny Caldwell

Song

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

Malcolm Campbell

Editor

Ray Caple

Matte Painter

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Ben Cauley

Song

Alan Chuntz

Stunts

Ira Coleman

Video

Rob Corn

Assistant Director

Pam Cornfeld

Production Coordinator

Ken Court

Art Director

Samuel C Crucher

Sound Editor

Carl Cunningham

Song

Clive Curtis

Stunts

John Daveikis

Other

Rande Deluca

Photography

Michael Deluna

Stunts

Linda Devetta

Makeup

Don Digirolamo

Sound

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Vernon Duke

Song

Kathy Durning

Music Editor

P Eastwood

Stunts

Abderrazak El Moustaghit

Stunts

Peter Elford

Location Manager

Stuart Fell

Stunts

George Folsey

Producer

David Forman

Stunts

Terry Forrestal

Stunts

Tony Fox

Special Effects

Rick Franklin

Sound Editor

Lowell Ganz

Screenplay

Mark Gardiner

Motion Control

Robert W Glass

Sound

Nigel Gostelow

Effects Assistant

Brian Grazer

Producer

Frank Griffin

Makeup

Jim Handbury

Stunts

Reg Harding

Stunts

Nick Heckstall-smith

Assistant Director

Pauline Heys

Makeup

Claude Hudson

Production Manager

Claude Hudson

Art Director

B D Johnson

Stunts

Brian Johnson

Special Effects Supervisor

James Kail

Makeup

Brahim Khabba

Stunts

Jimmy King

Song

David Knowles

Special Effects

Paul Knowles

Special Effects

Buzz Knudson

Sound

John J. Lloyd

Art Director

Babaloo Mandel

Screenplay

Paul Mccartney

Song

Paul Mccartney

Song Performer

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Derek Meddings

Photography

Lex Milloy

Stunts

John Morgan

Camera Operator

Peter Murton

Production Designer

Deborah Nadoolman

Costume Designer

Gerard Naprous

Stunts

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Howard Neiman

Sound Editor

George R. Nelson

Set Decorator

Stuart Neumann

Location Manager

Alan Nineberg

Adr Editor

Christopher Palmer

Original Music

John Palmer

Camera Operator

John Palmer

Production Manager

Phil Pastuhov

Photography

Robert Paynter

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Paynter

Director Of Photography

Anthony Phelan

Special Effects

Greg Powell

Wrangler

Nasir Saberi

Technical Advisor

Hugh Scaife

Art Director

Hugh Scaife

On-Set Dresser

David Senior

Production Assistant

Ivan Sharrock

Sound

Colin Skeaping

Stunts

David Sosna

Assistant Director

Jerry R Stanford

Sound Editor

Ben Stein

Executive Consultant

Dusty Symonds

Assistant Director

Gareth Tandy

Assistant Director

Rocky Taylor

Stunts

Dave Thomas

From Story

Dave Thomas

Story By

Jon Tiven

Song

George Voellmer

Dp/Cinematographer

George Voellmer

Director Of Photography

Sue Wain

Wardrobe Supervisor

David Watkins

Special Effects

Malcolm Weaver

Stunts

Brian West

Director Of Photography

Brian West

Dp/Cinematographer

Paul Weston

Stunts

Paul Weston

Stunt Coordinator

Jason White

Stunts

Barry Whitrod

Special Effects

Nick Wilkinson

Stunts

Sam Williams

Associate Producer

Paul Wilson

Photography

Alan Wiseman

Other

Ken Withers

Camera Operator

Film Details

Also Known As
Spioner är vi allihopa
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Spy
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
England, United Kingdom; United States; Norway; Morocco

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Articles

Ronald Reagan, 1911-2004 - TCM Remembers Ronald Reagan


Ronald Reagan (1911-2004)

Ronald Reagan, the actor turned elected official whose fascinating career saw him develop as a contract player for Warner Brothers studios, to a politician who fulfilled his ambitions by becoming the 40th President of the United States, died at his home in Los Angeles on June 5 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 93.

He was born Ronald Wilson Reagan on February 6, 1911 in Tampico, Illinois to John and Nelle Reagan. When Reagan was nine, his family settled down in the small community of Dixon, about 100 miles west of Chicago. After high school, Reagan enrolled in Eureka College, a small Christian school near Peoria. He graduated in 1932 with a degree in Economics, and pursued a career in broadcasting. His first gig was as a part-time announcer at WOC in Davenport, Iowa. Within a year, WOC had merged with its big-sister station, WHO in Des Moines, and Reagan was hired as a sports announcer.

In the spring of 1937, Reagan drove to Southern California to catch the Chicago Cubs in spring training on Santa Catalina Island. While he was in California, he wrangled a screen test and signed a contract for $200 a week with Warner Brothers. His film debut was rather inauspicious; he portrayed a radio announcer in an innocuous comedy Love is on the Air (1937). He made a few more "B" programmers like Hollywood Hotel (also 1937), and Girls on Probation (1938), before getting his first prominent role opposite Bette Davis in the popular tearjerker, Dark Victory (1939).

Although he seldom got credit for being a good actor, there was no denying that Reagan held his own given the right material: Knute Rockne, All American as the doomed Notre Dame football hero George "The Gipper" Gipp, where he delivered the film's immortal line "Win one for the Gipper!"; Santa Fe Trail in which he ably supports Errol Flynn in one of the boxoffice hits of its era (both 1940); Kings Row (1941), featuring one of his finest performances as a small-town playboy whose legs are amputated by a careless surgeon; and Desperate Journey (1942) where he again supported Flynn in an exciting action picture.

Due to his poor eyesight, Reagan didn't see any action in World War II, so the studio heads assigned him to star in a series of patriotic films produced by the First Motion Picture Unit of the Army Air Forces in Culver City. Between 1942-45, Reagan starred in over 400 of these films. After the war, Reagan still found some good roles: The Voice of the Turtle (1947) proved he had a deft hand at light comedy opposite Eleanor Parker; The Hasty Heart (1949) offered another underrated performance as he ably portrayed the Yank in John Patrick's much heralded wartime play; and Storm Warning (1950) was a slick melodrama that cast Reagan as a crusading District Attorney determined to bring the KKK in a small southern town, with the help of Doris Day and Ginger Rogers!

It was around this time that Reagan became involved in politics. In 1947, he began a five-year term as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and testified in October of that year before the newly formed House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). He identified suspected Communists Larry Parks, Howard Da Silva and Alexander Knox, all of whom were subsequently called to testify, and subsequently blacklisted. Later records showed Reagan was so concerned about the Communist influence in Hollywood, that he became an FBI informer.

As Reagan became steeped in his political career, his parts throughout the '50s became inferior: the notorious Bedtime for Bonzo (1951); the coy "sex" comedy She's Working Her Way Through College (1952) that cast him as a college professor who romances a stripper! (Virginia Mayo); Cattle Queen of Montana (1955), a sluggish Western that even the redoubtable Barbara Stanwyck couldn't save; and finally Hellcats of the Navy (1957), a stodgy war picture that would be his only film that co-starred his wife Nancy (Davis).

Television offered some salvation. For eight years, (1954-62), Reagan served as the host of General Electric Theater, a televised series of dramas. He also found a niche as GE's goodwill ambassador to employees and to civic and business groups around the country, furthering his taste and honing his craft as a public official. By the mid '60s, Reagan would move into politics entirely, save for one last film, the thrilling The Killers (1964), Reagan's only known villainous role, as a murderous gangster. That same year, he actively campaigned for Republican Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, although Goldwater lost to Lyndon B. Johnson.

Reagan whose profile was riding high, had cemented his future as a successful politician. In 1966, he ran against incumbent Governor Pat Brown for the state of California and won, serving successfully for two terms until 1974.

Reagan began an all-out, two-year drive to wrest the 1976 nomination from incumbent Gerald R. Ford, an appointed vice president who became president on the resignation of Nixon. Reagan fell short by a handful of delegates to the Republican national convention. But Ford lost to Jimmy Carter, and Reagan became the front-runner to challenge Carter in 1980. After defeating Carter, Reagan held two terms as President of the United States (1981-89). After his second term was over, he retired quietly in California. In 1994, it was revealed to the media that Reagan was suffering from Alzheimer's disease; he had been kept out of the public eye since then.

He was married briefly to actress Jane Wyman (1940-48), and had two children; a daughter Maureen and an adopted son, Michael. In 1952, he married a budding film starlet, Nancy Davis, who bore him two more children; a daughter, Patty; and a son, Ronald Jr. Ronald Reagan is survived by Nancy, Michael, Patty and Ron Jr. His daughter Maureen died of Melanoma in 2001 at the age of 60.

by Michael T. Toole
Ronald Reagan, 1911-2004 - Tcm Remembers Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan, 1911-2004 - TCM Remembers Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) Ronald Reagan, the actor turned elected official whose fascinating career saw him develop as a contract player for Warner Brothers studios, to a politician who fulfilled his ambitions by becoming the 40th President of the United States, died at his home in Los Angeles on June 5 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 93. He was born Ronald Wilson Reagan on February 6, 1911 in Tampico, Illinois to John and Nelle Reagan. When Reagan was nine, his family settled down in the small community of Dixon, about 100 miles west of Chicago. After high school, Reagan enrolled in Eureka College, a small Christian school near Peoria. He graduated in 1932 with a degree in Economics, and pursued a career in broadcasting. His first gig was as a part-time announcer at WOC in Davenport, Iowa. Within a year, WOC had merged with its big-sister station, WHO in Des Moines, and Reagan was hired as a sports announcer. In the spring of 1937, Reagan drove to Southern California to catch the Chicago Cubs in spring training on Santa Catalina Island. While he was in California, he wrangled a screen test and signed a contract for $200 a week with Warner Brothers. His film debut was rather inauspicious; he portrayed a radio announcer in an innocuous comedy Love is on the Air (1937). He made a few more "B" programmers like Hollywood Hotel (also 1937), and Girls on Probation (1938), before getting his first prominent role opposite Bette Davis in the popular tearjerker, Dark Victory (1939). Although he seldom got credit for being a good actor, there was no denying that Reagan held his own given the right material: Knute Rockne, All American as the doomed Notre Dame football hero George "The Gipper" Gipp, where he delivered the film's immortal line "Win one for the Gipper!"; Santa Fe Trail in which he ably supports Errol Flynn in one of the boxoffice hits of its era (both 1940); Kings Row (1941), featuring one of his finest performances as a small-town playboy whose legs are amputated by a careless surgeon; and Desperate Journey (1942) where he again supported Flynn in an exciting action picture. Due to his poor eyesight, Reagan didn't see any action in World War II, so the studio heads assigned him to star in a series of patriotic films produced by the First Motion Picture Unit of the Army Air Forces in Culver City. Between 1942-45, Reagan starred in over 400 of these films. After the war, Reagan still found some good roles: The Voice of the Turtle (1947) proved he had a deft hand at light comedy opposite Eleanor Parker; The Hasty Heart (1949) offered another underrated performance as he ably portrayed the Yank in John Patrick's much heralded wartime play; and Storm Warning (1950) was a slick melodrama that cast Reagan as a crusading District Attorney determined to bring the KKK in a small southern town, with the help of Doris Day and Ginger Rogers! It was around this time that Reagan became involved in politics. In 1947, he began a five-year term as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and testified in October of that year before the newly formed House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). He identified suspected Communists Larry Parks, Howard Da Silva and Alexander Knox, all of whom were subsequently called to testify, and subsequently blacklisted. Later records showed Reagan was so concerned about the Communist influence in Hollywood, that he became an FBI informer. As Reagan became steeped in his political career, his parts throughout the '50s became inferior: the notorious Bedtime for Bonzo (1951); the coy "sex" comedy She's Working Her Way Through College (1952) that cast him as a college professor who romances a stripper! (Virginia Mayo); Cattle Queen of Montana (1955), a sluggish Western that even the redoubtable Barbara Stanwyck couldn't save; and finally Hellcats of the Navy (1957), a stodgy war picture that would be his only film that co-starred his wife Nancy (Davis). Television offered some salvation. For eight years, (1954-62), Reagan served as the host of General Electric Theater, a televised series of dramas. He also found a niche as GE's goodwill ambassador to employees and to civic and business groups around the country, furthering his taste and honing his craft as a public official. By the mid '60s, Reagan would move into politics entirely, save for one last film, the thrilling The Killers (1964), Reagan's only known villainous role, as a murderous gangster. That same year, he actively campaigned for Republican Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, although Goldwater lost to Lyndon B. Johnson. Reagan whose profile was riding high, had cemented his future as a successful politician. In 1966, he ran against incumbent Governor Pat Brown for the state of California and won, serving successfully for two terms until 1974. Reagan began an all-out, two-year drive to wrest the 1976 nomination from incumbent Gerald R. Ford, an appointed vice president who became president on the resignation of Nixon. Reagan fell short by a handful of delegates to the Republican national convention. But Ford lost to Jimmy Carter, and Reagan became the front-runner to challenge Carter in 1980. After defeating Carter, Reagan held two terms as President of the United States (1981-89). After his second term was over, he retired quietly in California. In 1994, it was revealed to the media that Reagan was suffering from Alzheimer's disease; he had been kept out of the public eye since then. He was married briefly to actress Jane Wyman (1940-48), and had two children; a daughter Maureen and an adopted son, Michael. In 1952, he married a budding film starlet, Nancy Davis, who bore him two more children; a daughter, Patty; and a son, Ronald Jr. Ronald Reagan is survived by Nancy, Michael, Patty and Ron Jr. His daughter Maureen died of Melanoma in 2001 at the age of 60. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 6, 1985

Began shooting February 18, 1985.

Released in United States Winter December 6, 1985