From Beyond


1h 25m 1986
From Beyond

Brief Synopsis

Dr. Pretorius and his colleagues are working on an experiment involving stimulation of the pineal gland, which they believe may open the human mind to greater dimensions. The experiment succeeds, but has an unfortunate side-effect, the scientists are instantly attacked by dreadful life forms which were previously floating around them unseen. When one of these kills Dr. Pretorius, his colleague Dr. Tillinghast is suspected and confined to a psychiatric ward when he tries to explain what happened. Only one person, psychologist Dr. McMichaels, believes his story and favors the continuation of the project.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Empire Entertainment Company
Location
Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Synopsis

Dr. Pretorius and his colleagues are working on an experiment involving stimulation of the pineal gland, which they believe may open the human mind to greater dimensions. The experiment succeeds, but has an unfortunate side-effect, the scientists are instantly attacked by dreadful life forms which were previously floating around them unseen. When one of these kills Dr. Pretorius, his colleague Dr. Tillinghast is suspected and confined to a psychiatric ward when he tries to explain what happened. Only one person, psychologist Dr. McMichaels, believes his story and favors the continuation of the project.

Crew

Neal Adams

Art Department

Mac Ahlberg

Director Of Photography

Vanena Ament

Foley

Brad Arensman

Post-Production Supervisor

Juliet Avola

Post-Production Coordinator

Sergio Ballo

Wardrobe

Charles Band

Executive Producer

Richard Band

Music

Kevin Barla

Projectionist

Bruce Barlow

Special Effects

Anthony Barnao

Casting

Gabe Bartalos

Special Effects

Angee Beckett

Costume Designer

Luis E Bendezu

Post-Production Assistant

Ken Berger

Adr

Vittorio Bernardini

Projectionist

Roberto Bessi

Line Producer

Gary Bolger

Sound

Andrea Borella

Production Assistant

Mario Bramonti

Sound

Giancinto Bretti

Makeup

G W Brown

Adr Editor

John Buechler

Special Effects

Stephen Burg

Art Department

Robert A Burns

Set Decorator

Mariangela Capuano

On-Set Dresser

Fabrizio Caracciolo

Wardrobe

Dr. Salvatore Cichello

Technical Advisor

Gianni Cozzo

Production Manager

J Criswell

Other

Gino Crognale

Special Effects

Bruce Curtis

Associate Producer

Robert Dawson

Main Title Design

Gordon Day

Sound

Remo De Angelis

Stunt Coordinator

Andrea Del Brocco

Video

Giancarlo Del Brocco

Special Effects

Giancarlo Del Brocco

Makeup

Mitch Devane

Special Effects

Joe Dolinich

Special Effects

Anthony Doublin

Special Effects

Anthony Doublin

Digital Effects Supervisor

Therese Harding Doublin

Effects Assistant

John Blake Dutro

Special Effects

John Paul Fasal

Sound Effects

Maria Pia Federici

Production Coordinator

David Felker

Projectionist

Garry Ferrington

Assistant

Thom Floutz

Special Effects

Boni Fraulo

Consultant

Mauro Gasparri

Stunts

Paul Gentry

Special Effects

Marco Girardi

Stunts

Stuart Gordon

Story By

James Herrick

Assistant

Chris Hopkins

Assistant

Dave Kindlon

Prosthetics

Robert Kurzman

Special Effects

John Kwiatkowski

Sound Editor

Luca Lachin

Assistant Director

Teresa Longo

Foley Editor

H. P. Lovecraft

From Story

David Mansley

Visual Effects

Peter Mark

Effects Assistant

Dante Mastellari

Production Assistant

Laura Mccuistion

Assistant

Ralph Miller

Special Effects

Len Morganti

Art Department

Dennis Murphy

Production

Michael Muscal

Special Effects Coordinator

Giovanni Natalucci

Production Designer

John Naulin

Other

John Naulin

Special Effects

Greg Nicotero

Special Effects

Scott Niedzwiecki

Assistant

Linda Obalil

Visual Effects

Dennis Paoli

Screenplay

Dennis Paoli

Story By

Salvatore Passanisi

Special Effects Assistant

Steve Patino

Special Effects

Jonathan Pearthree

Sound Effects

Laura Pellutri

Stunts

Lee Percy

Editor

Hope Perello

Production Coordinator

Giuliano Principato

Unit Manager

Greg Punchatz

Special Effects

Robert J Ridges

Projectionist

Bob Roda

Production

Greg P. Russell

Adr

Greg P. Russell

Foley

Mauro Sacripanti

Assistant Director

Tom Scurry

Associate Editor

Rami Segal

Assistant Director

Paul Sharpe

Sound

Mark Shostrom

Prosthetics

Mark Shostrom

Special Effects

Aaron Sims

Special Effects

Jack Smalley

Original Music

Debra Spidell

Production Assistant

Jim Stewart

Animation Photography

Chris Stone

Original Music

Joseph Thomas

Music Editor

Giuseppe Tortora

Special Effects

Gino Vagniluca

Special Effects

David Van Meter

Adr

Randy Vandegrift

Sound Editor

John Vulich

Special Effects

Liz Wartenberg

Production Coordinator

Doug Westmoreland

Technical Advisor

Rick Wilson

Effects Assistant

Dr. Arthur Yuwiler

Technical Advisor

Brian Yuzna

Story By

Brian Yuzna

Producer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Empire Entertainment Company
Location
Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Articles

From Beyond


FROM BEYOND Following the critical and home video success of his debut feature, Re-Animator (1985), writer-director Stuart Gordon took a career turn that would change his life forever. A major force in the Chicago theater scene thanks to Organic Theater Company (which he founded with his wife and frequent repertory player Carolyn Purdy-Gordon), Gordon decided to move to Los Angeles where he teamed up with friend Brian Yuzna to make their first feature together, a startling, gory and outrageous jet-black comedy based on an obscure serialized tale by H.P. Lovecraft. Re-Animator proved to be the most famous film released by Empire Pictures, an indie distributor founded by Charles Band in 1983 focusing on horror and sci-fi projects with very low budgets. Empire had its first commercial success with Ghoulies (1985) and a cable hit with Trancers (1984), but Re-Animator was a major genre revolution that put Gordon, Yuzna and Band's company truly on the map.

A follow-up film was quickly initiated at Empire with Gordon and Yuzna returning with frequent co-writer Dennis Paoli to pen From Beyond (1986), another Lovecraft adaptation based on a short story first published in 1934 in The Fantasy Fan magazine. Essentially a two-character chamber piece, the tale revolves around a nameless narrator who is horrified to discover that a scientist named Tillinghast has discovered that electronic stimulation of the human pineal gland reveals another dimension floating around us containing horrific creatures. That idea forms the basis of the film, which demotes Tillinghast to an oddball supporting character played by Re-Animator star Jeffrey Combs. Primary villain duties here go to Ted Sorel as Dr. Edward Pretorius, whose experiments with a machine called the Resonator drive his associate mad and into the care of a doctor, Katherine McMichaels (Barbara Crampton, also of Re-Animator fame). The investigating detective, Bubba Brownlee (Ken Foree, star of 1978's Dawn of the Dead), accompanies the doctor and patient back to Pretorius' lab where all hell breaks loose.

A marked break from Gordon's previous film, From Beyond is filled with vibrant, splashy colors and flights of outright fantasy with an array of practical effect grotesqueries from another dimension. Also returning here is composer Richard Band, whose cheeky pilfering of Bernard Herrmann's Psycho (1960) in the prior film is replaced here with his most elaborate symphonic concoction in the grand monster movie tradition. Gordon and company play the material comparatively straight, opting for an air of escalating menace instead of the cavalcade of sick laughs that had made them famous. The film's biggest revelation actually proved to be Crampton, who moves far beyond her damsel in distress role that had made her famous and here delivers a complex, fascinating heroine who explores her more perverse side in the film's twisted final act.

While Re-Animator had gone out to theaters unrated with a notice that viewers under 17 would not be permitted (while a greatly watered-down version was prepared for home video with an R rating and plenty of excised narrative footage restored to compensate), the powers that be decided From Beyond stood a better chance theatrically with an R rating from the outset. That necessitated a considerable number of cuts at the behest of the MPAA, though not as many as they originally demanded from Gordon. The damage to the film was significant and resulted in numerous pacing and continuity issues that harmed the overall effectiveness of the film from start to finish. The fact that splashy gore effects turned up in promotional featurettes and documentaries around the film rubbed salt in the wound for horror fans, and for many years, publications reported that the original unrated cut was impossible to salvage given the editorial process of getting it through the ratings board gauntlet. However, when the rights to the film passed to MGM, the excised footage was recovered with a full restoration of Gordon's cut undertaken to bring it back to its original excessive glory. That full-strength version aired on the now defunct but beloved Monsters HD channel, with later home video releases on DVD and eventually Blu-ray. The film's reputation has also ascended considerably thanks to that turn of events, and it is now regarded as an essential and imaginative entry in the rich heritage of Lovecraft cinema.

By Nathaniel Thompson
From Beyond

From Beyond

FROM BEYOND Following the critical and home video success of his debut feature, Re-Animator (1985), writer-director Stuart Gordon took a career turn that would change his life forever. A major force in the Chicago theater scene thanks to Organic Theater Company (which he founded with his wife and frequent repertory player Carolyn Purdy-Gordon), Gordon decided to move to Los Angeles where he teamed up with friend Brian Yuzna to make their first feature together, a startling, gory and outrageous jet-black comedy based on an obscure serialized tale by H.P. Lovecraft. Re-Animator proved to be the most famous film released by Empire Pictures, an indie distributor founded by Charles Band in 1983 focusing on horror and sci-fi projects with very low budgets. Empire had its first commercial success with Ghoulies (1985) and a cable hit with Trancers (1984), but Re-Animator was a major genre revolution that put Gordon, Yuzna and Band's company truly on the map. A follow-up film was quickly initiated at Empire with Gordon and Yuzna returning with frequent co-writer Dennis Paoli to pen From Beyond (1986), another Lovecraft adaptation based on a short story first published in 1934 in The Fantasy Fan magazine. Essentially a two-character chamber piece, the tale revolves around a nameless narrator who is horrified to discover that a scientist named Tillinghast has discovered that electronic stimulation of the human pineal gland reveals another dimension floating around us containing horrific creatures. That idea forms the basis of the film, which demotes Tillinghast to an oddball supporting character played by Re-Animator star Jeffrey Combs. Primary villain duties here go to Ted Sorel as Dr. Edward Pretorius, whose experiments with a machine called the Resonator drive his associate mad and into the care of a doctor, Katherine McMichaels (Barbara Crampton, also of Re-Animator fame). The investigating detective, Bubba Brownlee (Ken Foree, star of 1978's Dawn of the Dead), accompanies the doctor and patient back to Pretorius' lab where all hell breaks loose. A marked break from Gordon's previous film, From Beyond is filled with vibrant, splashy colors and flights of outright fantasy with an array of practical effect grotesqueries from another dimension. Also returning here is composer Richard Band, whose cheeky pilfering of Bernard Herrmann's Psycho (1960) in the prior film is replaced here with his most elaborate symphonic concoction in the grand monster movie tradition. Gordon and company play the material comparatively straight, opting for an air of escalating menace instead of the cavalcade of sick laughs that had made them famous. The film's biggest revelation actually proved to be Crampton, who moves far beyond her damsel in distress role that had made her famous and here delivers a complex, fascinating heroine who explores her more perverse side in the film's twisted final act. While Re-Animator had gone out to theaters unrated with a notice that viewers under 17 would not be permitted (while a greatly watered-down version was prepared for home video with an R rating and plenty of excised narrative footage restored to compensate), the powers that be decided From Beyond stood a better chance theatrically with an R rating from the outset. That necessitated a considerable number of cuts at the behest of the MPAA, though not as many as they originally demanded from Gordon. The damage to the film was significant and resulted in numerous pacing and continuity issues that harmed the overall effectiveness of the film from start to finish. The fact that splashy gore effects turned up in promotional featurettes and documentaries around the film rubbed salt in the wound for horror fans, and for many years, publications reported that the original unrated cut was impossible to salvage given the editorial process of getting it through the ratings board gauntlet. However, when the rights to the film passed to MGM, the excised footage was recovered with a full restoration of Gordon's cut undertaken to bring it back to its original excessive glory. That full-strength version aired on the now defunct but beloved Monsters HD channel, with later home video releases on DVD and eventually Blu-ray. The film's reputation has also ascended considerably thanks to that turn of events, and it is now regarded as an essential and imaginative entry in the rich heritage of Lovecraft cinema. By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 24, 1986

Released in United States on Video April 1987

Began shooting January 27, 1986.

Completed shooting April 1986.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States on Video April 1987

Released in United States Fall October 24, 1986