The January Man


1h 37m 1989

Brief Synopsis

The escapades of an unorthodox New York City policeman as he searches for a serial killer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Calendrier meurtrier, January Man
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Lions Gate Releasing; METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

The escapades of an unorthodox New York City policeman as he searches for a serial killer.

Crew

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunts

David Allan

Choreographer

E R Ayotte

Costume Designer

Kelly Baker

Assistant

Jeff Balsmeyer

Art Department

Hank Bauer

Carpenter

Alan Bergman

Theme Lyrics

Marilyn Bergman

Theme Lyrics

Renee Bodner

Script Supervisor

Beth Boigon

Location Manager

Shelley Boylen

Production Coordinator

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

Gary Brink

Set Decorator

Elizabeth Broden

Assistant

James Douglas Brown

Hair

Bruce Carwardine

Sound Mixer

Devra Cohen

Other

Christopher Cook

Associate Producer

Christopher Cronyn

Unit Production Manager

Stephen Danza

Location Manager

Susanna David

Script Supervisor

Daniel R Davis

Art Director

Michael Dicosimo

Consultant

Graham Docherty

Wardrobe

Jeannine Edmunds

Assistant

James Fanning

Transportation Coordinator

Alison Fisher

Dialogue Editor

Judie Fixler

Casting

George Furniotis

Titles And Opticals

Sue Gandy

Assistant

Glen Gauthier

Boom Operator

Alison Grace

Dialogue Editor

Michael Green

Assistant Camera Operator

Patricia Green

Makeup

Romaine Greene

Hair

Rhonda Gunner

Animator

James Halpenny

Construction

Brian Hamill

Photography

Marvin Hamlisch

Song

Marvin Hamlisch

Music

Paul Harding

Property Master

Don Hewitt

Stunts

Paulin Ho

Accountant

Richard Hollander

Animator

Willie Holst

Scenic Artist

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Kevin Jewison

Assistant Camera Operator

Norman Jewison

Producer

Juanita

Song Performer

Lynda Kemp

Wardrobe Supervisor

Moe Koffman

Music

Lacia Kornylo

Production Associate

Sharon Lackie

Sound Editor

Paul Lane

Stunts

Carol Lavoie

Set Decorator

Donald J. Lee

Assistant Director

Janice Leibowitz

Production Assistant

Steve Lindsey

Song

Steven Lindsey

Song

Lou Lombardo

Editor

Lynn Lombardo

Assistant

Michael Macdonald

Production Manager

Cherie Macneill

Assistant Editor

Andy Malcolm

Foley Artist

Soomi Marano

Production Coordinator

Paul Massey

Sound

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup

Rod Mcbrien

Song

Gloria Mcleod

Assistant Camera Operator

Gregory L Mcmurry

Animator

Brent Meyer

Stunts

Veronica Miller

Accountant

Andy Mulkani

Key Grip

Andy Nelson

Sound

Peter Norman

Camera Operator

Michael O'farrell

Sound Editor

John Oates

On-Set Dresser

Harald Ortenburger

Camera Operator

Michael Pacek

Assistant Editor

Richard Parker

Animal Wrangler

Richard Perry

Song

Suzanne Pillsbury

Assistant Editor

Giacomo Puccini

Music

David Pultz

Color Timer

Ray Quinlan

Lighting Technician

Tammy Quinn

Production Assistant

Tammy Quinn

Other

Tom Quinn

Assistant Director

Richard Reseigne

Construction Coordinator

Valley Via Reseigne

Assistant

Jason Rodney

Location Assistant

Jane Rosenberg

Assistant

Philip Rosenberg

Production Designer

Daniel Rosenblum

Boom Operator

Ann Roth

Costume Designer

Curtis Roush

Music Editor

Jill Greenberg Sands

Casting

Siv Sandstrom

Art Department Coordinator

David Sardi

Assistant Director

Ursula Schrader

Costumes

Takashi Seida

Photography

John Patrick Shanley

Screenplay

Roger Sherman

Assistant

William Sohmer

Other

Neil Spisak

Costume Designer

Eoin Sprott

Other

Wally Stocklin

Property Master

Michael Stockton

On-Set Dresser

Douglas Stone

Assistant

Nick Sweetman

Transportation Coordinator

Ezra Swerdlow

Producer

Todd Thaler

Casting

George Themeils

Auditor

Peter Thillaye

Sound Effects Editor

Neil Trifunovich

Special Effects Coordinator

Joel Tuber

Assistant Director

Katherine Venti

Casting Associate

Richard Ventre

Other

Greg Walker

Stunt Coordinator

Martin Walters

Assistant Director

Bob Ward

Key Grip

John C Wash

Animator

Jonathan M. Watson

Assistant

Johanna Weinstein

Main Title Design

Questar Welsh

Song

Tom Weston

Camera Operator

Don White

Sound

Gord White

Assistant Art Director

Jim Whitson

Other

Susan J. Wright

Costumes

Rick Young

Lighting Technician

Jerzy Zielinski

Dp/Cinematographer

Jerzy Zielinski

Director Of Photography

Ed Zigo

Technical Advisor

Film Details

Also Known As
Calendrier meurtrier, January Man
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Lions Gate Releasing; METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 13, 1989

Released in United States on Video September 7, 1989

Completed shooting May 13, 1988.

Began shooting March 17, 1988.

Released in United States Winter January 13, 1989

Released in United States on Video September 7, 1989