Rain Man


2h 20m 1988
Rain Man

Brief Synopsis

A con artist discovers he has a wealthy, autistic brother.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rain Man: Cuando los hermanos se encuentran
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Hinto, Oklahoma, USA; Cogar, Oklahoma, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Guthrie, Oklahoma, USA; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Indiana, USA; El Reno, Oklahoma, USA; Southgate, Kentucky, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Synopsis

Charlie Babbitt has just discovered he has an autistic brother named Raymond and is now taking him on the ride of his life. Or is it the other way around? From his refusal to drive on major highways to a "four minutes to Wapner" meltdown at an Oklahoma farmhouse, Raymond first pushes hot-headed Charlie to the limits of his patience and then pulls him completely out of his self-centered world.

Crew

Todd Adelman

Other

Edward Aiona

Property Master

Brian Armstrong

Assistant Camera Operator

Ted Bafaloukos

Assistant

Ron Bass

Screenplay

Michael Frost Beckner

Assistant

Richard Beggs

Sound Designer

Roger Birnbaum

Assistant

Michael Bortman

Screenplay

Edwin Butterworth

Makeup

David M Canestro

Dolly Grip

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Lou Christie

Song Performer

Robin Citrin

Location Manager

Al Clay

Music

Johnny Clegg

Song Performer

Johnny Clegg

Song

Blair Daily

Assistant Editor

Rhody Davis

Post-Production Coordinator

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

Louis Digiaimo

Casting

Patricia Douglas

Production Assistant

John Ellingwood

Assistant Camera Operator

William A Elliott

Art Director

Jim Flamberg

Music Editor

Leigh French

Adr

Ken Friedman

Assistant

Cara Giallanza

Assistant Director

Ian Gillian

Song Performer

Roger Glover

Song Performer

Richard Bryce Goodman

Sound

Mark Gordon

Song

Lee Gottsegen

Production Associate

Bill Gray

Transportation Coordinator

Peter Guber

Executive Producer

Randy Handley

Song

W. Franke Harling

Song

Norm Harris

Lighting Technician

Scott Harris

Production Assistant

Barbara Hawkins

Song

Rosa Lee Hawkins

Song

James Hegedus

Production

Michael Helfand

Production Assistant

M Todd Henry

Camera Operator

Pieter S Hubbard

Sound Editor

David J Hudson

Sound

Etta James

Song Performer

Bob Johnson

Other

Johnny Johnson

Song

Mark Johnson

Producer

Joe Jones

Song

Keith A Jones

Production Assistant

Marilyn Jones

Song

Sharon Jones

Song

Michael R Joyce

Production Supervisor

David Katz

Video Playback

Ron Kenyon

Best Boy

Jack Klette

Production Assistant

Robin Knight

Key Grip

Bonnie Kurt

Assistant

Bruce Lacey

Sound Editor

John A. Larsen

Sound Editor

John Lennon

Song

Stu Linder

Editor

Jimmy Ling

Sound Editor

Bob Luman

Song Performer

William Mapother

Production Assistant

Jocko Marcellino

Song

Jocko Marcellino

Song Performer

Cherylanne Martin

Assistant Director

Allan Mason

Music Supervisor

Paul Mccartney

Song

Tom Mccown

On-Set Dresser

David Mcgiffert

Assistant Director

David Mcgiffert

Associate Producer

Nick Mclean

Assistant Camera Operator

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

Gerald R Molen

Coproducer

Gerald R Molen

Unit Production Manager

Steven R. Molen

Transportation Captain

Sarah Monat

Foley

Sue Moore

Costumes

Thomas Moore

Editing

Barry Morrow

Screenplay

Barry Morrow

From Story

Andrea Morse

Assistant

Gail Mutrux

Associate Producer

Don Myers

Special Effects Supervisor

Aaron Neville

Song Performer

Spooner Oldham

Song

James Orendorff

Foreman

Mitchell Parish

Song

Kim Peek

Assistant

Jon Peters

Executive Producer

Bill Phillips

Sound Editor

John Phillips

Sound Editor

Bernie Pollack

Costume Designer

Doc Pomus

Song

Terry Porter

Sound

Richard Price

Screenplay

Ida Random

Production Designer

Jay Rifkin

Music

Bernard Rinland

Consultant

Leo Robin

Song

Howard Rose

Assistant Camera Operator

Arnold M Rosen

Consultant

Marie Rowe

Casting

Ken Ryan

Production Accountant

Lata Ryan

Production Coordinator

Hal Sanders

Sound Editor

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

John Seale

Director Of Photography

Kas Self

Stand-In

Scott Senechal

Dga Trainee

Rick Sharp

Makeup

Bodil Sivertsen

Consultant

Steven Spielberg

Other

Edward Steidele

Foley

George Stokes

Construction Coordinator

Mark Sullivan

Matte Painter

Ruth C Sullivan

Consultant

Steven Talmy

Production Assistant

Peter E Tanguay

Consultant

Jessie Thomas

Song

Darold A Treffert

Consultant

James W. Tyson

Costumes

Stephen Vaughan

Photography

Harry Warren

Song

Rob Wasserman

Song Performer

Dara Weintraub

Production Assistant

Freddy Weller

Song

Richard A. Whiting

Song

Marian Wilde

Sound Designer

Jeffrey Wilhoit

Sound Editor

Joy Zapata

Hair

Hans Zimmer

Music

Kenneth D Zunder

Camera Operator

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Rain Man: Cuando los hermanos se encuentran
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Hinto, Oklahoma, USA; Cogar, Oklahoma, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Guthrie, Oklahoma, USA; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Indiana, USA; El Reno, Oklahoma, USA; Southgate, Kentucky, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Award Wins

Best Actor

1988
Dustin Hoffman

Best Director

1988

Best Original Screenplay

1988
Ron Bass

Best Original Screenplay

1988
Barry Morrow

Best Picture

1988

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1988
Ida Random

Best Cinematography

1988

Best Editing

1988
Stu Linder

Best Score

1988

Articles

Rain Man


In acknowledging how Rain Man (1988) became one of the undisputed Hollywood classics of the last generation, winning four Academy Awards and huge box-office profits, the achievements of those involved become that much more remarkable in light of the genuinely dizzying circumstances of the project's development.

As reflected in the final cut, Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), an arrogant young hustler striving to keep his gray-market auto import concern afloat, learns of his estranged father's death and flies from L.A. to his native Cincinnati for the reading of the will. To his shock, he discovers he's been left little more than a '48 Buick Roadmaster, with the bulk of the $3 million estate placed into trust. Charlie's investigations lead him to a local institution for the mentally disabled, and circumstances reveal that he has a heretofore unknown older brother residing there.

Raymond Babbitt (Dustin Hoffman) is severely autistic, unable to make eye contact or deal with any deviation from his strict routine, yet amazingly able to perform feats of memorization and to process complex calculations. Charlie spirits Raymond off the institution's grounds, intending to go home and hold him in return for half of the inheritance. Raymond's needs necessitate that the trip back west be made by car, and the odyssey provides Charlie with several surprising revelations about his brother and himself.

As initially conceived in 1984 by Barry Morrow, who authored the heralded telefilm Bill (1981), Rain Man concerned a middle-aged boiler-room huckster who's just found out that the family fortune has gone to an engagingly affectionate savant brother. Their misadventures on a cross-country drive were filled with overdone buddy-flick hi-jinks such as being pursued by loan sharks and white supremacists and escaping from a burning barn, and the proceedings were capped by a happy decision to spend the rest of their lives together.

Envisioning a successful Christmas-season comedy, MGM/UA optioned the script in 1986, and quickly attached as director Martin Brest, coming off of his success with Beverly Hills Cop (1984). The script was shopped to Hoffman to gauge his interest in playing the conniving Charlie, but it was the role of the savant Raymond that got his attention. After Hoffman committed, Cruise expressed his interest in working opposite his longtime idol. But Morrow, who objected to the casting of the too-youthful Cruise, was dismissed by Brest.

After that, three writers were hired in quick succession to tackle the script, and three weeks before production was to start, Brest abruptly left the production. While Steven Spielberg was being wooed as a replacement, Hoffman sought changes in the script. In the course of his research, the actor learned of the inability of autistics to connect with others, and sought to have Raymond's character redrawn. "Instead of a character who craved affection and was inherently sympathetic," scenarist Ronald Bass stated in Newsweek, "here was a character who wouldn't be touched, who wasn't lovable."

Spielberg eventually passed to work on Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), and Hoffman attempted to recruit Sydney Pollack, a move that raised many an eyebrow in light of the legendary blow-ups the two had during the making of Tootsie (1982). Pollack signed on, brought in his own writers, hired a crew, and then withdrew.

Standing on the sidelines, ready to step in, was Barry Levinson, who was faced with a studio who now wanted a Christmas movie (for 1988) and an imminent industry writer's strike. Nevertheless, under Levinson's aegis, the script was purged of the feel-good conclusion and the last vestiges of broad farce, with the focus being placed on character interplay and how Cruise's self-absorbed, type A glad-hander finally learns how to connect with another human being. Of Levinson, Hoffman told Newsweek that "He's like a guy out there in a battlefield, sitting in a chair with his hands folded, and the bullets are all over the place. But somehow he knows he's out of range. He's in control but doesn't appear to show it."

While Hoffman clearly deserved the Best Actor Oscar for his unique and original characterization, Cruise's contributions can't be overlooked. While Hoffman's character by necessity cannot grow in the course of the narrative, Cruise had the onus of demonstrating Charlie's development in a compelling manner, and did so admirably. Rain Man went on to accrue a handsome $172 million in domestic box-office receipts, and capture the Best Picture Oscar as well as statues for Levinson, Bass and Morrow.

Producer: Mark Johnson
Director: Barry Levinson
Screenplay: Barry Levinson, David Rayfiel, Ronald Bass, Barry Morrow
Art Direction: William Elliott
Cinematography: John Seale
Editing: Stu Linder
Music: Hans Zimmer
Principal Cast: Dustin Hoffman (Raymond Babbitt), Tom Cruise (Charlie Babbitt), Valeria Golino (Susannah), Gerald R. Molen (Dr. Bruner), Jack Murdock (John Mooney), Bonnie Hunt (Sally Dibbs), Michael D. Roberts (Vern).
C-134m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jay Steinberg
Rain Man

Rain Man

In acknowledging how Rain Man (1988) became one of the undisputed Hollywood classics of the last generation, winning four Academy Awards and huge box-office profits, the achievements of those involved become that much more remarkable in light of the genuinely dizzying circumstances of the project's development. As reflected in the final cut, Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), an arrogant young hustler striving to keep his gray-market auto import concern afloat, learns of his estranged father's death and flies from L.A. to his native Cincinnati for the reading of the will. To his shock, he discovers he's been left little more than a '48 Buick Roadmaster, with the bulk of the $3 million estate placed into trust. Charlie's investigations lead him to a local institution for the mentally disabled, and circumstances reveal that he has a heretofore unknown older brother residing there. Raymond Babbitt (Dustin Hoffman) is severely autistic, unable to make eye contact or deal with any deviation from his strict routine, yet amazingly able to perform feats of memorization and to process complex calculations. Charlie spirits Raymond off the institution's grounds, intending to go home and hold him in return for half of the inheritance. Raymond's needs necessitate that the trip back west be made by car, and the odyssey provides Charlie with several surprising revelations about his brother and himself. As initially conceived in 1984 by Barry Morrow, who authored the heralded telefilm Bill (1981), Rain Man concerned a middle-aged boiler-room huckster who's just found out that the family fortune has gone to an engagingly affectionate savant brother. Their misadventures on a cross-country drive were filled with overdone buddy-flick hi-jinks such as being pursued by loan sharks and white supremacists and escaping from a burning barn, and the proceedings were capped by a happy decision to spend the rest of their lives together. Envisioning a successful Christmas-season comedy, MGM/UA optioned the script in 1986, and quickly attached as director Martin Brest, coming off of his success with Beverly Hills Cop (1984). The script was shopped to Hoffman to gauge his interest in playing the conniving Charlie, but it was the role of the savant Raymond that got his attention. After Hoffman committed, Cruise expressed his interest in working opposite his longtime idol. But Morrow, who objected to the casting of the too-youthful Cruise, was dismissed by Brest. After that, three writers were hired in quick succession to tackle the script, and three weeks before production was to start, Brest abruptly left the production. While Steven Spielberg was being wooed as a replacement, Hoffman sought changes in the script. In the course of his research, the actor learned of the inability of autistics to connect with others, and sought to have Raymond's character redrawn. "Instead of a character who craved affection and was inherently sympathetic," scenarist Ronald Bass stated in Newsweek, "here was a character who wouldn't be touched, who wasn't lovable." Spielberg eventually passed to work on Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), and Hoffman attempted to recruit Sydney Pollack, a move that raised many an eyebrow in light of the legendary blow-ups the two had during the making of Tootsie (1982). Pollack signed on, brought in his own writers, hired a crew, and then withdrew. Standing on the sidelines, ready to step in, was Barry Levinson, who was faced with a studio who now wanted a Christmas movie (for 1988) and an imminent industry writer's strike. Nevertheless, under Levinson's aegis, the script was purged of the feel-good conclusion and the last vestiges of broad farce, with the focus being placed on character interplay and how Cruise's self-absorbed, type A glad-hander finally learns how to connect with another human being. Of Levinson, Hoffman told Newsweek that "He's like a guy out there in a battlefield, sitting in a chair with his hands folded, and the bullets are all over the place. But somehow he knows he's out of range. He's in control but doesn't appear to show it." While Hoffman clearly deserved the Best Actor Oscar for his unique and original characterization, Cruise's contributions can't be overlooked. While Hoffman's character by necessity cannot grow in the course of the narrative, Cruise had the onus of demonstrating Charlie's development in a compelling manner, and did so admirably. Rain Man went on to accrue a handsome $172 million in domestic box-office receipts, and capture the Best Picture Oscar as well as statues for Levinson, Bass and Morrow. Producer: Mark Johnson Director: Barry Levinson Screenplay: Barry Levinson, David Rayfiel, Ronald Bass, Barry Morrow Art Direction: William Elliott Cinematography: John Seale Editing: Stu Linder Music: Hans Zimmer Principal Cast: Dustin Hoffman (Raymond Babbitt), Tom Cruise (Charlie Babbitt), Valeria Golino (Susannah), Gerald R. Molen (Dr. Bruner), Jack Murdock (John Mooney), Bonnie Hunt (Sally Dibbs), Michael D. Roberts (Vern). C-134m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jay Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video August 30, 1989

Released in United States December 13, 1988

Released in United States February 1989

Released in United States November 1989

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 19 & 20, 1989.

Shown at Panorama of World Cinema in Sofia, Bulgaria November 20-30, 1989.

Richard Price, David Rayfiel, and Kurt Luedtke all helped in the writing of the screenplay, but were uncredited in the final publicity release. Martin Brest resigned as director over "creative differences". Along with the Academy Award for Best Actor, Dustin Hoffman also won the Italian David Award for Best Actor in a Foreign Film.

Completed shooting July 28, 1988.

Began shooting May 2, 1988.

Released in United States December 13, 1988 (Benefit screening in Cincinnati, Ohio December 13, 1988.)

Released in United States Winter December 16, 1988

Released in United States February 1989 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 19 & 20, 1989.)

Released in United States on Video August 30, 1989

Released in United States November 1989 (Shown at Panorama of World Cinema in Sofia, Bulgaria November 20-30, 1989.)

Released in United States Winter December 16, 1988