The Warriors


1h 34m 1979

Brief Synopsis

A gang is framed for the murder of rival gang's leader.

Film Details

Also Known As
Warriors, Warriors - Krigarna, guerreros, guerriers de la nuit
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Release Date
1979

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

The gangs of New York City call a truce in an attempt to unite as one powerful group, but when a gang leader is killed and The Warriors are wrongly accused of the crime, the truce is off. Stranded in enemy territory, with every gang in the city out for revenge, The Warriors struggle to survive and make their way back to their home turf, Coney Island.

Crew

Phyllis Altenhaus-smith

Assistant Editor

William Andrews

Sound Effects Editor

Bob Barth

Assistant Director

Craig Baxley

Stunts

Craig Baxley

Stunt Coordinator

Howard Beals

Sound Effects

Sam Bernstein

Production Accountant

Frank Bianco

Hair

Barbara Black-sterne

Costume Illustrator

Neil Canton

Assistant

John Caper Jr.

Sound Editor

Claude Cave

Song

Desmond Child

Song

Desmond Child

Song Performer

William Curry

Other

Freeman Davies

Editor

Martha De Laurentiis

Assistant Producer

Barry Devorzon

Song

Barry Devorzon

Music

Laurie Dietz

Assistant

Lamont Dozier

Song

Edward Drohan

Special Effects

Russ Engels

Gaffer

Sylvia Fay

Casting

Joe Ferla

Music Supervisor

Howard Feuer

Casting

Richard Fields

Assistant Editor

Peter Garberini

Camera Operator

Gail Geibel

Production Coordinator

Michael Ginsburg

Photography

Larry Gordon

Producer

Bruce Greenfield

Dga Trainee

Peter Gries

Assistant Director

Paul Griffin

Music Arranger

Shawn Hanley

Sound Editor

Walter Hill

Screenplay

A. Kitman Ho

Location Manager

David Holden

Editor

Brian Holland

Song

Eddie Holland

Song

Jack C. Jacobsen

Sound

William Kane

Property Master

John Kennedy

Key Grip

Rick Kline

Sound

Frederick Laplano

Song Performer

Andrew Laszlo

Director Of Photography

Andrew Laszlo

Dp/Cinematographer

William Loger

Wardrobe

William Lucek

Scenic Artist

Harry Lynott

Carpenter

Michael Maggi

Makeup

Bobbie Mannix

Costumes

Bobbie Mannix

Costume Designer

Frank Marshall

Executive Producer

Phil Marshall

Song

Arnold Mcculler

Song Performer

Eric Mercury

Song

Al Mian

Sound

Donald O Mitchell

Sound

Sandy Morse

Editor

Susan E Morse

Editor

Rob Mounsey

Music Arranger

Alan Robert Murray

Sound Effects Editor

Steve Nathanson

Song

Lee Osborne

Sound Effects Editor

Dan Perri

Titles

Vincent Poncia

Song

Genya Raven

Song Performer

Artie Ripp

Song

Jamie Ritzer

Casting

Tex Rudloff

Sound

David Shaber

Screenplay

Joel Silver

Associate Producer

Bob Simon

Dga Trainee

William Smith

Song

David Sosna

Assistant Director

John Starke

Production Manager

Michael L Stone

Camera Operator

David Streit

Location Manager

Don Swanagan

Art Director

George Trirogoff

Assistant Editor

Kenny Vance

Music Supervisor

Johnny Vastano

Song Performer

Johnny Vastano

Song

Joe Walsh

Music

Joe Walsh

Song Performer

George Watters

Sound Effects Editor

Billy Weber

Editor

Fred Weiler

Set Decorator

Giboney Whyte

Script Supervisor

Bob Wightman

Art Director

Carlos Wilson

Song

Louis Wilson

Song

Paul Wilson

Props

Dr. Richard Wilson

Song

Robert Wilson

Props

Wolfredo Wilson

Song

Mary Ellen Winston

Costumes

Sol Yurick

Source Material (From Novel)

Film Details

Also Known As
Warriors, Warriors - Krigarna, guerreros, guerriers de la nuit
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Release Date
1979

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The Warriors (1979)


Maybe it was a case of bad timing. Maybe it was the no name cast and an ad campaign slanted toward young male viewers. Maybe it was the exaggerated reports of gang violence that occurred in or near theatres that showed the film. Whatever the reasons for its disappointing public reception, The Warriors should have been a blockbuster hit for Paramount in 1979 and should have put Walter Hill on Hollywood's A-list of directors well before his genuine breakout success with 48 Hrs in 1982. It even ended up on many film critics' top ten lists for the year but even positive word of mouth didn't draw in the crowds. A pity because The Warriors is stylish, exciting, and imaginative with a striking visual design that transforms New York City into a nocturnal fantasy world of the near future. The look and feel of the movie predates the current trend of movies based on graphic novels and comic books and perhaps that's another reason for its low profile. The movie was simply ahead of its time.

Walter Hill based The Warriors on Sol Yurick's acclaimed novel which in turn was inspired by Xenophon's Anabasis, a tale about a small group of Greek soldiers stranded in Persia after the death of their leader and the obstacles they face on their return home. According to Danny Peary in Cult Movies Hill's film may have adapted Yurick's contemporary setting but his narrative and characters are more directly influenced by Anabasis. In the movie the Warriors "exhibit qualities characteristic of classical heroes: gallantry, self-pride, loyalty, discipline, resourcefulness, and most of all, the ability to fight. These are characters about which legends are told, epic poems written, movies made. On the other end of the spectrum is Yurick's youth gang, the Dominators, a bunch of punk kids who are frauds – they only play at being soldiers. Yurick has no respect for them at all, making them so ignorant that they can't figure out how to read a subway map, giving them such names as Lunkface, Bimbo, Arnold and The Junior."

Shooting on New York City locations at night - Riverside Park on the Upper West Side, the 72nd Street & Broadway subway station, the New Utrecht Ave-62nd Street station in Brooklyn - Hill avoided the gritty, realistic cityscape of Yurick's novel which depicted a city in decay populated by drug addicts, pimps, whores, psychopaths and the homeless. Instead he "transformed the city into a phantasmagoric labyrinth of weird tribes in fantastic dress and make-up who move over (and under) the streets as untouched as troglodytes by the civilization sleeping around them." (David Pirie, TimeOut Film Guide).

In the film's lean, linear narrative, nine members of the Coney Island gang the Warriors arrive in the Bronx to attend a meeting of the clans held by Cyrus, the leader of the most respected gang in the city. A riot breaks out when Cyrus is suddenly assassinated by Luther, head of the Rogues, who accuses the Warriors of the crime. When Cleon, the Warrior's leader, is killed in the ensuing chaos, the surviving members led by Swan attempt to make it back safely to their home turf. On their long journey home they inevitably cross over into hostile territory, battling such rival gangs as the Orphans, the Baseball Furies, the Lizzies and the Punks, all the while pursued by the Rogues and the psychotic Luther.

Although the poster ad for The Warriors with its armed and intimidating gang members looking ready to rumble promised a violent, bloody action thriller, Hill's film is actually closer in style to a Hong Kong martial arts film. The fights are choreographed as kinetic ballets and there is very little blood or even deaths that occur during the many skirmishes. Hill also adds an additional narrative device in the guise of a female DJ who broadcasts the play-by-play progress of the Warriors while playing appropriate tunes such as "Nowhere to Run." (Perhaps this was inspired by the 1971 cult film Vanishing Point which features a DJ who periodically gives updates on an ex-race car driver's suicidal speed run from Denver to San Francisco).

Walter Hill reveals in his DVD commentary for the director's cut of The Warriors that the final film was a departure from his original conception: "At the very beginning, I said [that] to do this properly and to do the vision of the novel, it really only makes sense if you do it all black and Hispanic. And the studio was not very keen on that idea. I later came to realize that the studio forced me into the comic book idea, because it was the only way I could make it all make sense to myself."

Among the actors in The Warriors, Michael Beck, as the take-charge Swan, seemed poised for a successful career after this promising debut. He had the chiseled features and laconic qualities of a young Steve McQueen or Charles Bronson but never found that major breakout role and got stuck in a B-movie rut supplemented by steady work in television. The other cast standout is David Patrick Kelly as the demented Luther whose grating chant, "Warriors, come out and playay!" remains the movie's most quoted line. Kelly has gone on to play a variety of weirdos (Dreamscape, 1984) and villains (Commando, 1985, Wild at Heart, 1990) despite attempts to break away from the stereotype (Flirting with Disaster, 1996, Songcatcher, 2000) but The Warriors will probably be the film engraved on his epitaph. The real star of The Warriors, however, is the cinematography of Andrew Laszlo. He would go on to photograph two more films for Hill (Southern Comfort, 1981, Streets of Fire, 1984) and such big budget pictures as Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989).

After the film was released, many urban theatre owners were reluctant to book it after reports of gang-related violence at a few screenings in Los Angeles and Boston. A legislator in Massachusetts even tried to get the film banned in his state. Regardless of its undeserved notoriety, The Warriors received glowing reviews from such respected critics as Pauline Kael of The New Yorker who wrote: "The film enters into the spirit of urban-male tribalism and the feelings of the kids who believe that they own the streets because they keep other kids out of them. In this vision, cops and kids are all there is, and the worst crime is to be chicken. It has – in visual terms – the kind of impact that "Rock Around the Clock" had when it was played behind the titles of Blackboard Jungle [1955]. It's like visual rock, and it's bursting with energy. The action runs from night until dawn, and most of it is in crisp, bright Day-Glo colors against the terrifying New York blackness; the figures stand out like a jukebox in a dark bar. There's a night-blooming, psychedelic shine to the whole baroque movie."

It will be interesting to see if Tony Scott's scheduled-for-2008 remake of The Warriors will be able to measure up to Walter Hill's iconic original.

Producers: Laurent Bouzereau, Freeman A. Davies, Lawrence Gordon
Director: Walter Hill
Screenplay: Walter Hill, David Shaber, based on the novel by Sol Yurick
Cinematography: Andrew Laszlo
Art Direction: Don Swanagan, Robert Wightman
Music: Barry De Vorzon
Film Editing: David Holden
Cast: Michael Beck (Swan), James Remar (Ajax), Dorsey Wright (Cleon), Brian Tyler (Snow), David Harris (Cochise), Deborah Van Valkenburgh (Mercy), David Patrick Kelly (Luther), Mercedes Ruehl (Policewoman).
C-93m. Letterboxed.

by Jeff Stafford

SOURCES:
wikipedia
Cult Movies by Danny Peary <>TimeOut Film Guide 5001 Nights at the Movies by Pauline Kael
The Warriors (1979)

The Warriors (1979)

Maybe it was a case of bad timing. Maybe it was the no name cast and an ad campaign slanted toward young male viewers. Maybe it was the exaggerated reports of gang violence that occurred in or near theatres that showed the film. Whatever the reasons for its disappointing public reception, The Warriors should have been a blockbuster hit for Paramount in 1979 and should have put Walter Hill on Hollywood's A-list of directors well before his genuine breakout success with 48 Hrs in 1982. It even ended up on many film critics' top ten lists for the year but even positive word of mouth didn't draw in the crowds. A pity because The Warriors is stylish, exciting, and imaginative with a striking visual design that transforms New York City into a nocturnal fantasy world of the near future. The look and feel of the movie predates the current trend of movies based on graphic novels and comic books and perhaps that's another reason for its low profile. The movie was simply ahead of its time. Walter Hill based The Warriors on Sol Yurick's acclaimed novel which in turn was inspired by Xenophon's Anabasis, a tale about a small group of Greek soldiers stranded in Persia after the death of their leader and the obstacles they face on their return home. According to Danny Peary in Cult Movies Hill's film may have adapted Yurick's contemporary setting but his narrative and characters are more directly influenced by Anabasis. In the movie the Warriors "exhibit qualities characteristic of classical heroes: gallantry, self-pride, loyalty, discipline, resourcefulness, and most of all, the ability to fight. These are characters about which legends are told, epic poems written, movies made. On the other end of the spectrum is Yurick's youth gang, the Dominators, a bunch of punk kids who are frauds – they only play at being soldiers. Yurick has no respect for them at all, making them so ignorant that they can't figure out how to read a subway map, giving them such names as Lunkface, Bimbo, Arnold and The Junior." Shooting on New York City locations at night - Riverside Park on the Upper West Side, the 72nd Street & Broadway subway station, the New Utrecht Ave-62nd Street station in Brooklyn - Hill avoided the gritty, realistic cityscape of Yurick's novel which depicted a city in decay populated by drug addicts, pimps, whores, psychopaths and the homeless. Instead he "transformed the city into a phantasmagoric labyrinth of weird tribes in fantastic dress and make-up who move over (and under) the streets as untouched as troglodytes by the civilization sleeping around them." (David Pirie, TimeOut Film Guide). In the film's lean, linear narrative, nine members of the Coney Island gang the Warriors arrive in the Bronx to attend a meeting of the clans held by Cyrus, the leader of the most respected gang in the city. A riot breaks out when Cyrus is suddenly assassinated by Luther, head of the Rogues, who accuses the Warriors of the crime. When Cleon, the Warrior's leader, is killed in the ensuing chaos, the surviving members led by Swan attempt to make it back safely to their home turf. On their long journey home they inevitably cross over into hostile territory, battling such rival gangs as the Orphans, the Baseball Furies, the Lizzies and the Punks, all the while pursued by the Rogues and the psychotic Luther. Although the poster ad for The Warriors with its armed and intimidating gang members looking ready to rumble promised a violent, bloody action thriller, Hill's film is actually closer in style to a Hong Kong martial arts film. The fights are choreographed as kinetic ballets and there is very little blood or even deaths that occur during the many skirmishes. Hill also adds an additional narrative device in the guise of a female DJ who broadcasts the play-by-play progress of the Warriors while playing appropriate tunes such as "Nowhere to Run." (Perhaps this was inspired by the 1971 cult film Vanishing Point which features a DJ who periodically gives updates on an ex-race car driver's suicidal speed run from Denver to San Francisco). Walter Hill reveals in his DVD commentary for the director's cut of The Warriors that the final film was a departure from his original conception: "At the very beginning, I said [that] to do this properly and to do the vision of the novel, it really only makes sense if you do it all black and Hispanic. And the studio was not very keen on that idea. I later came to realize that the studio forced me into the comic book idea, because it was the only way I could make it all make sense to myself." Among the actors in The Warriors, Michael Beck, as the take-charge Swan, seemed poised for a successful career after this promising debut. He had the chiseled features and laconic qualities of a young Steve McQueen or Charles Bronson but never found that major breakout role and got stuck in a B-movie rut supplemented by steady work in television. The other cast standout is David Patrick Kelly as the demented Luther whose grating chant, "Warriors, come out and playay!" remains the movie's most quoted line. Kelly has gone on to play a variety of weirdos (Dreamscape, 1984) and villains (Commando, 1985, Wild at Heart, 1990) despite attempts to break away from the stereotype (Flirting with Disaster, 1996, Songcatcher, 2000) but The Warriors will probably be the film engraved on his epitaph. The real star of The Warriors, however, is the cinematography of Andrew Laszlo. He would go on to photograph two more films for Hill (Southern Comfort, 1981, Streets of Fire, 1984) and such big budget pictures as Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989). After the film was released, many urban theatre owners were reluctant to book it after reports of gang-related violence at a few screenings in Los Angeles and Boston. A legislator in Massachusetts even tried to get the film banned in his state. Regardless of its undeserved notoriety, The Warriors received glowing reviews from such respected critics as Pauline Kael of The New Yorker who wrote: "The film enters into the spirit of urban-male tribalism and the feelings of the kids who believe that they own the streets because they keep other kids out of them. In this vision, cops and kids are all there is, and the worst crime is to be chicken. It has – in visual terms – the kind of impact that "Rock Around the Clock" had when it was played behind the titles of Blackboard Jungle [1955]. It's like visual rock, and it's bursting with energy. The action runs from night until dawn, and most of it is in crisp, bright Day-Glo colors against the terrifying New York blackness; the figures stand out like a jukebox in a dark bar. There's a night-blooming, psychedelic shine to the whole baroque movie." It will be interesting to see if Tony Scott's scheduled-for-2008 remake of The Warriors will be able to measure up to Walter Hill's iconic original. Producers: Laurent Bouzereau, Freeman A. Davies, Lawrence Gordon Director: Walter Hill Screenplay: Walter Hill, David Shaber, based on the novel by Sol Yurick Cinematography: Andrew Laszlo Art Direction: Don Swanagan, Robert Wightman Music: Barry De Vorzon Film Editing: David Holden Cast: Michael Beck (Swan), James Remar (Ajax), Dorsey Wright (Cleon), Brian Tyler (Snow), David Harris (Cochise), Deborah Van Valkenburgh (Mercy), David Patrick Kelly (Luther), Mercedes Ruehl (Policewoman). C-93m. Letterboxed. by Jeff Stafford SOURCES: wikipedia Cult Movies by Danny Peary TimeOut Film Guide 5001 Nights at the Movies by Pauline Kael

The Warriors - THE WARRIORS - The Ultimate Director's Cut on DVD


Set in a decrepit metropolis, the bleak plot of The Warriors, Walter Hill's 1979 film now available on DVD from Paramount, centers on delinquent youths involved in an elaborate network of illegal activities. As hundreds of delinquents converge on a vacant lot, a charismatic captain known as Cyrus (Roger Hill) announces his plans to unite gang efforts under a corrupt council capable of overthrowing the police. With stirring campaign promises Cyrus entices this senate of young adults to unanimously approve his strategy for structured disobedience. That is, until one member of the anarchistic army decides to dethrone the ruling power. Luther (David Patrick Kelly) fires a gun from within the crowd and kills Cyrus, but amidst the chaos those in attendance are unable to identify the lone assailant. Following this cataclysmic climax Luther blames The Warriors for Cyrus's assassination and with a prevailing "guilty until proven innocent" mentality The Warriors are forced to flee the scene hoping only to reach the safety of their home turf on Coney Island. Some 20 miles from the shore, the outlook appears rather bleak for The Warriors, yet undeterred they diligently begin the hazardous expedition.

Given the simplistic "chase film" story described above one may wonder how The Warriors ever reached cult classic status. In truth, The Warriors built an alarming audience in the late 1970's by using a heavily stylized presentation that vividly illustrated the seedier side of life. A by-product of the source material written by Sol Yurick the visual motifs fashion a cinematic conquest, surely the intention considering Yurick's novel directly draws from the Greek tale Anabasis by Xenophon (a parallel story of Greek soldiers stranded behind enemy lines).

Shot in the Burroughs of New York during the summer of 1978, The Warriors incorporated locations and a low-key lighting scheme that blanketed each set under ominous darkness. In fact, the continual night photography forced cinematographer Andrew Laszlo (First Blood (1982), Innerspace [1987]) to utilize a device frequently found in Film Noir. Knowing the reflective properties of water, Laszlo sprayed exterior locations with enough "rain" to allow the asphalt and concrete surfaces to operate as a mirror. The damp ground permitted otherwise mundane streets and sidewalks to visually echo the sparse illumination found within a nocturnal city. Add to this an astute use of costuming, thanks to the creative work of designer Bobbie Mannix (End of Days (1999), The Texas Chainsaw Massacre [2003]), and gangs such as the infamous Baseball Furies immediately mark themselves as a menace before fighting ever begins on screen.

In compliment to these aspects of the film, one must also commend the performances brought forth by a then unknown collection of young actors. With figures such as Ajax played by James Remar, an actor who would eventually go on to fame in the HBO series "Sex and the City," the men and women of The Warriors each display skills that would foster future careers. From Marcelino Sanchez as Rembrandt, who would later appear as a member of The Bloodhound Gang on PBS's "3-2-1 Contact," to Deborah Van Valkenburgh as Mercy, who appeared in Streets of Fire (1984) opposite Michael Pare and Diane Lane, many audience members will recognize these protagonists from other B-movies and serialized television. The film was a box office success and earned the label of a cult classic (in fact, it inspired Rockstar Games to collaborate with Paramount Pictures on a video game version of the film in 2005).

This brings us to the recent release of The Warriors: Ultimate Director's Cut DVD. Consisting of a spotless print and several extra features, this DVD by Paramount Home Entertainment honors the rich history of this memorable film. The brief introduction by none other than director Walter Hill (48 Hrs. (1982), Red Heat (1988)) enables this passionate filmmaker, albeit through concise commentary, to inform the viewer about the numerous challenges encountered during The Warriors' shoot in NYC. The DVD also contains a multitude of documentaries, each highlighting a specific part of the production via several interviews with the likes of Michael Beck who played the stoic character of Swan. Additionally, numerous crewmembers speak on behalf of the original production; not least of which is producer Lawrence Gordon whose credits include blockbusters such as Predator (1987) and Die Hard (1988). Such behind the scenes anecdotes shed light on how the story was ultimately constructed and the overwhelming/shocking reaction this film received following its debut.

The documentaries are fortunately divided into four manageable segments that viewers can enjoy individually or all together. The only drawbacks that one may find in viewing this DVD involve the overabundance of previews (which thankfully can be skipped via chapter advance) and the lack of a full-fledged commentary track. All in all, viewers young and old familiar with the film will enjoy the Director's Cut version on DVD.

For more information about The Warriors, visit Paramount Home Entertainment. To order The Warriors, go to TCM Shopping.

by Christian Pierce

The Warriors - THE WARRIORS - The Ultimate Director's Cut on DVD

Set in a decrepit metropolis, the bleak plot of The Warriors, Walter Hill's 1979 film now available on DVD from Paramount, centers on delinquent youths involved in an elaborate network of illegal activities. As hundreds of delinquents converge on a vacant lot, a charismatic captain known as Cyrus (Roger Hill) announces his plans to unite gang efforts under a corrupt council capable of overthrowing the police. With stirring campaign promises Cyrus entices this senate of young adults to unanimously approve his strategy for structured disobedience. That is, until one member of the anarchistic army decides to dethrone the ruling power. Luther (David Patrick Kelly) fires a gun from within the crowd and kills Cyrus, but amidst the chaos those in attendance are unable to identify the lone assailant. Following this cataclysmic climax Luther blames The Warriors for Cyrus's assassination and with a prevailing "guilty until proven innocent" mentality The Warriors are forced to flee the scene hoping only to reach the safety of their home turf on Coney Island. Some 20 miles from the shore, the outlook appears rather bleak for The Warriors, yet undeterred they diligently begin the hazardous expedition. Given the simplistic "chase film" story described above one may wonder how The Warriors ever reached cult classic status. In truth, The Warriors built an alarming audience in the late 1970's by using a heavily stylized presentation that vividly illustrated the seedier side of life. A by-product of the source material written by Sol Yurick the visual motifs fashion a cinematic conquest, surely the intention considering Yurick's novel directly draws from the Greek tale Anabasis by Xenophon (a parallel story of Greek soldiers stranded behind enemy lines). Shot in the Burroughs of New York during the summer of 1978, The Warriors incorporated locations and a low-key lighting scheme that blanketed each set under ominous darkness. In fact, the continual night photography forced cinematographer Andrew Laszlo (First Blood (1982), Innerspace [1987]) to utilize a device frequently found in Film Noir. Knowing the reflective properties of water, Laszlo sprayed exterior locations with enough "rain" to allow the asphalt and concrete surfaces to operate as a mirror. The damp ground permitted otherwise mundane streets and sidewalks to visually echo the sparse illumination found within a nocturnal city. Add to this an astute use of costuming, thanks to the creative work of designer Bobbie Mannix (End of Days (1999), The Texas Chainsaw Massacre [2003]), and gangs such as the infamous Baseball Furies immediately mark themselves as a menace before fighting ever begins on screen. In compliment to these aspects of the film, one must also commend the performances brought forth by a then unknown collection of young actors. With figures such as Ajax played by James Remar, an actor who would eventually go on to fame in the HBO series "Sex and the City," the men and women of The Warriors each display skills that would foster future careers. From Marcelino Sanchez as Rembrandt, who would later appear as a member of The Bloodhound Gang on PBS's "3-2-1 Contact," to Deborah Van Valkenburgh as Mercy, who appeared in Streets of Fire (1984) opposite Michael Pare and Diane Lane, many audience members will recognize these protagonists from other B-movies and serialized television. The film was a box office success and earned the label of a cult classic (in fact, it inspired Rockstar Games to collaborate with Paramount Pictures on a video game version of the film in 2005). This brings us to the recent release of The Warriors: Ultimate Director's Cut DVD. Consisting of a spotless print and several extra features, this DVD by Paramount Home Entertainment honors the rich history of this memorable film. The brief introduction by none other than director Walter Hill (48 Hrs. (1982), Red Heat (1988)) enables this passionate filmmaker, albeit through concise commentary, to inform the viewer about the numerous challenges encountered during The Warriors' shoot in NYC. The DVD also contains a multitude of documentaries, each highlighting a specific part of the production via several interviews with the likes of Michael Beck who played the stoic character of Swan. Additionally, numerous crewmembers speak on behalf of the original production; not least of which is producer Lawrence Gordon whose credits include blockbusters such as Predator (1987) and Die Hard (1988). Such behind the scenes anecdotes shed light on how the story was ultimately constructed and the overwhelming/shocking reaction this film received following its debut. The documentaries are fortunately divided into four manageable segments that viewers can enjoy individually or all together. The only drawbacks that one may find in viewing this DVD involve the overabundance of previews (which thankfully can be skipped via chapter advance) and the lack of a full-fledged commentary track. All in all, viewers young and old familiar with the film will enjoy the Director's Cut version on DVD. For more information about The Warriors, visit Paramount Home Entertainment. To order The Warriors, go to TCM Shopping. by Christian Pierce

Quotes

Can you dig it?
- Cyrus
Why don't you just tie a mattress to your back? You don't care where it is, do you?
- Swan
Did you see him get busted?
- Swan
I seen him, then he wasn't there no more ... I was hauling ass!
- Cochise
Why don't you look around and make sure we're okay.
- Swan
This is a graveyard!
- Rembrandt
Maybe you're all just goin' faggot.
- Ajax
Be lookin' good, Warriors. All the way back to Coney. You hear me babies? Good.
- D.J.

Trivia

Loosely based on Xenophon's "Anabasis."

The choreographed fight in the men's room took 5 days (8am to 7pm) to shoot.

Director Walter Hill originally wanted the Warriors to be an all black gang, but the producers disagreed.

Hill originally intended an initial subtitle which read "Sometime in the future."

The IND Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station in Brooklyn was used for the 96th St. station scenes. The train operated on one of the unused outer tracks.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States February 1979

Released in United States Winter February 9, 1979

Released in United States February 1979

Released in United States Winter February 9, 1979