Love, Honor and Behave


1h 10m 1938
Love, Honor and Behave

Brief Synopsis

A college tennis star gives up the game for love.

Film Details

Also Known As
Everybody Was Very Nice
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Mar 12, 1938
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Everybody Was Very Nice" by Stephen Vincent Benét in The Saturday Evening Post (5 Sep 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

New Yorker Dan Painter feels that his wife Sally is setting a bad example for their son Ted with her attitude toward winning. Where Sally feels that there is no shame in losing and the important thing is to lose cheerfully, Dan believes that it is important to play fair but play to win. Although he loves Sally, Dan has an affair with the more glamorous Lisa Blake. When Sally discovers the affair, she demands a divorce even though Dan stresses that there is nothing between them anymore. Lisa and her husband Jim divorce as well, but despite Lisa's willingness to marry him, Dan remains single. Sally marries Dr. MacConaghey and encourages Ted to become a doctor like his stepfather. To Dan's disappointment, Ted, now an adult, becomes a tennis player rather than going out for football as he did. During a big game, when his victory will mean that his school will win the match, Ted deliberately loses after he is credited with a point that he believes he does not deserve. Sally is proud of him for living according to her ideals. Another member of the audience is Barbara Blake, daughter of Jim and Lisa. She reintroduces herself to Ted, inviting him to the dance that night. Sally does not approve, but Ted is charmed by Barbara and agrees to attend. Barbara falls in love with Ted and decides to marry him. A short time later, Ted and Barbara elope. Both sets of parents are disturbed by the marriage, especially when Ted announces that he no longer intends to become a doctor but will take on a failing soap company. Ted works long hours, and Barbara, craving attention, starts attending parties with her former fiancé, Pete Martin. Sally tells Ted that Barbara is involved with Pete, but actually Barbara has been rejecting Pete's passes. Unfortunately, Sally and Ted walk in on them just as Pete is kissing Barbara, and Ted assumes the worst. Dan advises Ted to throw Pete out and express his love for Barbara, but Ted, like his mother, intends to ignore everything. When his company goes bankrupt, Ted asks Dan for a job, but is turned down because Dan believes that Ted is afraid of failure. Hearing the story, Dr. MacConaghey tells Sally that her continual interference has ruined her son's life. Finally, Barbara and Ted have a serious fight, yelling and hitting each other. Barbara is delighted by the turn of events and her happiness is complete when Ted turns down Dan's job offer to take work as a ditchdigger.

Film Details

Also Known As
Everybody Was Very Nice
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
Mar 12, 1938
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Everybody Was Very Nice" by Stephen Vincent Benét in The Saturday Evening Post (5 Sep 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's working title was Everybody Was Very Nice.