Go Naked in the World


1h 43m 1961
Go Naked in the World

Brief Synopsis

A powerful businessman opposes his son's involvement with a woman with a past.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Minneapolis opening: 18 Jan 1961
Production Company
Arcola Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Go Naked in the World by Tom T. Chamales (New York, 1959).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Following a tour of duty with the Army, wealthy Nick Stratton returns to his hometown of San Francisco. Torn between the desirability of keeping his independence and going to work for his devoted but dominating father in the construction business, he checks into a hotel to think things over for a few days. That night he meets and is immediately attracted to Giulietta (Julie) Cameron, unaware that she is a well-known and extremely high-priced prostitute. Eventually Nick's father, Pete, finds him and brings him home, but the peaceful reunion explodes into a violent argument when Pete once more tries to force his own way of life upon his son. Following the stormy session, Nick leaves home and returns to Julie, with whom he falls desperately in love. On the night of the Strattons' 30th wedding anniversary, Nick brings Julie to his parents' party and is horrified to learn that most of the men present--including his father--have had sexual relations with her. Though Nick vows never to see Julie again, he is unable to stay away, and he returns to her. Pete, however, continues to try to break up the romance, and Nick is forced to take Julie to Acapulco. Finally convinced that Nick will never be happy without Julie, Pete visits her secretly and asks her to marry Nick. Aware that her past would always haunt their marriage, however, she pretends to be bored with the affair and sends Nick away. Once he has left, she ends her life by hurling herself into the sea.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Minneapolis opening: 18 Jan 1961
Production Company
Arcola Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Go Naked in the World by Tom T. Chamales (New York, 1959).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Go Naked in the World


In 1960, Gina Lollobrigida didn't get the role in La Dolce Vita (1960) that eventually went to Anouk Aimee because her husband turned it down without asking her, and she refused a chance to replace the hospitalized Elizabeth Taylor on the money-hemmorhaging set of Cleopatra (1963) because she didn't want to work under then-director Rouben Mamoulian. But even if her instinct for choosing good projects was less than clairvoyant, Lollobrigida still gave her all to this picture, a bittersweet melodrama about a privileged son (Anthony Franciosa) and his sincere yet doomed love affair with a high-class call girl (Lollobrigida). Even though Lollobrigida usually didn't like playing prostitutes, something about the role was meaty enough to intrigue her. Unfortunately, no amount of professionalism could stave off a Screen Actor's Guild strike that interrupted the shoot, nor could it help her learn her English language lines faster, causing no small alarm when her director Ranald MacDougall regularly noticed a "blank stare sort of thing" coming from his star. Undeterred, Lollobrigida moved on to the more well-recieved Come September (1961) opposite Rock Hudson.
Go Naked In The World

Go Naked in the World

In 1960, Gina Lollobrigida didn't get the role in La Dolce Vita (1960) that eventually went to Anouk Aimee because her husband turned it down without asking her, and she refused a chance to replace the hospitalized Elizabeth Taylor on the money-hemmorhaging set of Cleopatra (1963) because she didn't want to work under then-director Rouben Mamoulian. But even if her instinct for choosing good projects was less than clairvoyant, Lollobrigida still gave her all to this picture, a bittersweet melodrama about a privileged son (Anthony Franciosa) and his sincere yet doomed love affair with a high-class call girl (Lollobrigida). Even though Lollobrigida usually didn't like playing prostitutes, something about the role was meaty enough to intrigue her. Unfortunately, no amount of professionalism could stave off a Screen Actor's Guild strike that interrupted the shoot, nor could it help her learn her English language lines faster, causing no small alarm when her director Ranald MacDougall regularly noticed a "blank stare sort of thing" coming from his star. Undeterred, Lollobrigida moved on to the more well-recieved Come September (1961) opposite Rock Hudson.

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Location scenes filmed in San Francisco and Acapulco.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 1961

Cinemascope

Released in United States Winter February 1961