Yentl


2h 14m 1983
Yentl

Brief Synopsis

A Jewish girl masquerades as a boy to study Torah, but falls in love with her best friend.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Musical
Period
Adaptation
Religion
Release Date
1983
Production Company
Barwood Films; Completion Bond Company Inc; General Screen Enterprises; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Distribution Company
MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Location
Czechoslovakia

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 14m

Synopsis

A young Eastern European woman, circa 1904, disguises herself as a boy in order to pursue her passion for studying holy scripture.

Crew

Barbara Allen

Production Coordinator

Zelda Barron

Script Supervisor

Frank Batt

Key Grip

Alan Bergman

Lyrics

Marilyn Bergman

Lyrics

Michael Bloom

Technical Consultant

George Brand

Music Editor

Jim Brennan

Location Manager

Shimeon Brisman

Technical Consultant

Garrett Brown

Steadicam Operator

Allen Burry

Publicist

Vladimir Cajahamel

Supervisor

Robin Clarke

Music Editor

Cis Corman

Casting

Tony Czech

Supervisor

Tessa Davies

Set Decorator

Larry Dewaay

Executive Producer

Lucjan Dobroszycki

Technical Consultant

Rick Edelstein

Special Consultant

Laura Geller

Technical Consultant (Religion)

Jan Gerstel

Production Assistant

Keith Grant

Sound Recording (Music)

Steven Harding

Assistant Director

Gordon Hayman

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Les Healey

Assistant Editor

David Hildyard

Sound Recording

Louis Jacobs

Technical Consultant

David James

Stills

Colin Jamison

Hairstyles

William Lang

Location Manager

Steve Lanning

Assistant Director

Daniel Lapin

Technical Consultant (Religion)

Michel Legrand

Original Music

Michel Legrand

Music; Music Director

Rusty Lemorande

Coproducer

Rusty Lemorande

Co-Producer

Beryl Lerman

Makeup

Gillian Lynne

Choreography (Wedding Dance)

Peter Macdonald

Camera Operator

Barrie Melrose

Production Supervisor

Douglas Milsome

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Judy Moorcroft

Costumes

Keith Morton

Wardrobe

Oldrich Okaj

Supervisor

Pamela Parker

Post-Production Coordinator

Toby F Phillips

Steadicam Operator

Rudi Prokes

Supervisor

Harry Rabinowicz

Technical Consultant (Religion)

Mila Radova

Supervisor

Terry Rawlings

Editor

Hillary Anne Ripps

Post-Production Coordinator

Jack Rosenthal

Screenwriter

Bill Rowe

Sound Rerecording

Wally Schneiderman

Makeup

Chaim Seidler-feller

Technical Consultant (Religion)

Andrew Shields

Video Operator

Jim Shields

Sound Editor

Isaac Bashevis Singer

From Story ("Yentl The Yeshiva Boy")

Karel Skop

Supervisor

Barbra Streisand

Producer

Barbra Streisand

Screenwriter

Leslie Tomkins

Art Direction

Sue Wain

Wardrobe

Josh Waletzky

Technical Consultant

Roy Walker

Production Designer

Peter Waller

Assistant Director

Joan Washington

Dialogue Coach

David Watkin

Director Of Photography

Terry Wells

Props

Jeff Werner

Post-Production Associate

Alan Whibley

Special Effects

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Musical
Period
Adaptation
Religion
Release Date
1983
Production Company
Barwood Films; Completion Bond Company Inc; General Screen Enterprises; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Distribution Company
MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Location
Czechoslovakia

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 14m

Award Wins

Best Score (Adapt. & Orig. Song)

1983

Award Nominations

Set Decoration

1983

Best Song

1983

Best Supporting Actress

1983
Amy Irving

Articles

Yentl


"This has to be a musical!" Marilyn and Alan Bergman exclaimed in unison to Barbra Streisand when she showed the songwriters the script for Yentl. This project, developed from Isaac Bashevis Singer's Yentl (1983), the Yeshiva Boy, had been dear to Streisand's heart since she first optioned the story in 1968. It tells of a young Jewish woman in Poland who, after the loss of her father, disguises herself as a boy so she can go to a Yeshiva (Jewish school for priests) and study the Torah. Streisand, who ended up directing, co-producing and co-writing the film as well as starring in it, had planned it as an intimate, non-musical drama until the Bergmans persuaded her to add songs. As quoted by Streisand biographer James Spada, Marilyn Bergman explained, "We felt it was a wonderful story for a musical, because it is [about] a character with a secret. Throughout the picture, after her father dies, there is nobody to whom she can talk, to whom she can reveal her essential self. And this rich inner life becomes the [song] score."

Because they felt the music should be lushly romantic and rooted in the European tradition, the Bergmans considered Michel Legrand the perfect composer to collaborate on the Yentl score. "The kind of music Michel writes is timeless. It could be the 18th, 19th or 20th century," said Alan. Added Marilyn: "The challenge was to make the music exotic and colorful, but not so special that it doesn't have universality." In developing the songs, the trio joined Streisand for lengthy sessions in the music room of the Bergmans' Beverly Hills home. "Our housekeeper would bring us food trays and we'd eat up there," recalled Alan. "Sometimes we'd go late into the night. It was like there was no outside world; The greatest thing about working on the movie was, where else in the world could you call your director and say, "Come over and sing this song for us?"

The collaboration was so fruitful that Yentl won an Oscar for Best Song Score. The Bergmans and Legrand also were nominated twice in the "Best Song" category, for "Papa, Can You Hear Me?" and "The Way He Makes Me Feel." (The winner in that category was the title tune from Flashdance.) Yentl, released through MGM-UA, won only one other nomination, that of Best Supporting Actress for Amy Irving. Noticeably absent in every category for which she was eligible, Streisand did not attend the awards ceremony; Yentl's nominated songs were performed by Donna Summer and Jennifer Holliday. "In Hollywood, a woman can be an actress, a singer, a dancer," Streisand said later. "But don't let her be too much more."

Producers: Rusty Lemorande, Barbra Streisand
Director: Barbra Streisand
Screenplay: Jack Rosenthal, Barbra Streisand, from story by Isaac Bashevis Singer
Production Design: Leslie Tomkins, Roy Walker
Cinematography: David Watkin
Costume Design: Judy Moorcroft
Editing: Terry Rawlings
Original Music: Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand
Principal Cast: Barbra Streisand (Yentl/Anshel), Mandy Patinkin (Avigdor) Amy Irving (Hadass), Nehemiah Persoff (Yentl's father), Steven Hill (Hadass' father), Robbie Barnett (Zelig).
C-134m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Roger Fristoe
Yentl

Yentl

"This has to be a musical!" Marilyn and Alan Bergman exclaimed in unison to Barbra Streisand when she showed the songwriters the script for Yentl. This project, developed from Isaac Bashevis Singer's Yentl (1983), the Yeshiva Boy, had been dear to Streisand's heart since she first optioned the story in 1968. It tells of a young Jewish woman in Poland who, after the loss of her father, disguises herself as a boy so she can go to a Yeshiva (Jewish school for priests) and study the Torah. Streisand, who ended up directing, co-producing and co-writing the film as well as starring in it, had planned it as an intimate, non-musical drama until the Bergmans persuaded her to add songs. As quoted by Streisand biographer James Spada, Marilyn Bergman explained, "We felt it was a wonderful story for a musical, because it is [about] a character with a secret. Throughout the picture, after her father dies, there is nobody to whom she can talk, to whom she can reveal her essential self. And this rich inner life becomes the [song] score." Because they felt the music should be lushly romantic and rooted in the European tradition, the Bergmans considered Michel Legrand the perfect composer to collaborate on the Yentl score. "The kind of music Michel writes is timeless. It could be the 18th, 19th or 20th century," said Alan. Added Marilyn: "The challenge was to make the music exotic and colorful, but not so special that it doesn't have universality." In developing the songs, the trio joined Streisand for lengthy sessions in the music room of the Bergmans' Beverly Hills home. "Our housekeeper would bring us food trays and we'd eat up there," recalled Alan. "Sometimes we'd go late into the night. It was like there was no outside world; The greatest thing about working on the movie was, where else in the world could you call your director and say, "Come over and sing this song for us?" The collaboration was so fruitful that Yentl won an Oscar for Best Song Score. The Bergmans and Legrand also were nominated twice in the "Best Song" category, for "Papa, Can You Hear Me?" and "The Way He Makes Me Feel." (The winner in that category was the title tune from Flashdance.) Yentl, released through MGM-UA, won only one other nomination, that of Best Supporting Actress for Amy Irving. Noticeably absent in every category for which she was eligible, Streisand did not attend the awards ceremony; Yentl's nominated songs were performed by Donna Summer and Jennifer Holliday. "In Hollywood, a woman can be an actress, a singer, a dancer," Streisand said later. "But don't let her be too much more." Producers: Rusty Lemorande, Barbra Streisand Director: Barbra Streisand Screenplay: Jack Rosenthal, Barbra Streisand, from story by Isaac Bashevis Singer Production Design: Leslie Tomkins, Roy Walker Cinematography: David Watkin Costume Design: Judy Moorcroft Editing: Terry Rawlings Original Music: Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand Principal Cast: Barbra Streisand (Yentl/Anshel), Mandy Patinkin (Avigdor) Amy Irving (Hadass), Nehemiah Persoff (Yentl's father), Steven Hill (Hadass' father), Robbie Barnett (Zelig). C-134m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Feature directorial debut for actress and singer Barbra Streisand.

Released in United States Fall November 18, 1983

Released in United States Fall November 18, 1983