Spaceballs


1h 36m 1987
Spaceballs

Brief Synopsis

Only a rogue space merchant can stop an evil dictator from stealing a planet's air supply.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Also Known As
Det våras för rymden, Space Balls, folle histoire de l'espace
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Satire
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1987
Production Company
James Steube
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Yuma, Arizona, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

In a galaxy very, very, very, very far away, Lone Starr and his co-pilot Barf the Mawg are leisurely traveling through space when they learn that Druish Princess Vespa is in danger from evil Lord Dark Helmet, who intends to steal the air from her planet Druidia. Lone Star and Barf are unable to help the princess until the wizard Yogurt instructs Lone Starr in the use of a mysterious power called "The Schwartz." Helmet has converted his spaceship into a huge vacuum cleaner and is about to strike Druidia when Lone Starr arrives and employs The Schwartz in a monumental battle with the villain.

Crew

Camille Abbott

Visual Effects

Peter Albiez

Special Effects Supervisor

Richard Alexander

Special Effects

Damon Allison

Special Effects

Max Alvarez

Makeup

Paul Amorelli

Electrician

Percy Angress

Miniatures

Percy Angress

Visual Effects

Michael Anthony

Song

Dale Ashman

Special Effects

Frank Aucone

Other

Charles Bailey

Digital Effects Supervisor

Sandina Bailo-lape

Sound Effects Editor

Michael John Bateman

Sound Editor

Dick Bauerie

Song

David Beasley

Visual Effects

Mat Beck

Motion Control

Richard Beggs

Sound

Rodney Lee Bennett

Driver

Mitchell Bock

Assistant Director

Jon Bon Jovi

Song Performer

Jon Bon Jovi

Song

Carol D Bonnefil

Assistant Director

Craig Boyajian

Effects Coordinator

Raymond Boyle

Special Effects

Steve Bridge

Camera Operator

Rob Brill

Song

Chet Brooks

Transportation Captain

Mel Brooks

Song

Mel Brooks

Screenplay

Mel Brooks

Producer

Conrad Buff

Editor

Grant Burdette

Special Effects

Rae Burkland

Visual Effects

Edward S Burza

Costumes

Kim Carnes

Song Performer

James Caverly

Production Assistant

Joanne Wetzel Caverly

Production Assistant

Michael Chavez

Camera Assistant

Jim Chesney

Transportation Coordinator

Clint Colver

Animation Supervisor

Don Courfal

Boom Operator

Mary Courtney

Production Coordinator

Armand Coutu

Costumes

Sharon Iris Crall

Costumes

John Crawford

Song

Kenneth J Creber

Set Designer

Steve Dane

Assistant Director

Lorraine L Dawson

Costumes

Albert Delgado

Special Effects

David R Diaz

Driver

Ken Diaz

Makeup

Peter Donen

Visual Effects Supervisor

Guilbert Dulfer

Tailor

Jim Dunsford

Dolly Grip

Syd Dutton

Matte Painter

John Michael Eaves

Visual Effects

Joseph English

Makeup

Bruce Ericksen

Costume Supervisor

Jonathan Erland

Visual Effects

Cory Faucher

Visual Effects

Craig Fehrman

Driver

Ken Fischer

Sound Effects Editor

Ernie Fosselius

Sound Effects Editor

John Franco

Props

John Franco

Set Decorator

David Freeman

Driver

Gerald Gadette

Other

Arthur Gelb

Property Master Assistant

Anthony Goldschmidt

Titles

Ronald D. Goldstein

Special Effects

John Goodwin

Makeup

Ronny Graham

Screenplay

Pat Grosswendt

Electrician

Peter Gruskoff

Production Assistant

Cy E Guerrier

Special Effects

Rhonda Gunner

Video

Rhonda Gunner

Video Playback

Sammy Hagar

Song

Paul Haines

Special Effects

David Hardberger

Motion Control

Alison Harstedt

Accountant

Steve Havrilla

Production

John Hawkins

Special Effects

Jack Hayes

Original Music

Frank Hernandez

Driver

Daren Hicks

Production Assistant

Lindsay P Hill

Video Playback

Richard Hollander

Video

William Hutchinson

Other

John Ignaszewski

Consultant

John Ignaszewski

Associate Editor

Ronald Jacobs

Sound Effects Editor

Paul Johnson

Motion Control

Tom Johnson

Foley

Gary L Karas

Special Effects

Peter Kelley

Set Designer

Perri Kimono

Costumes

Bill King

Property Master

Gerald A King

Grip

Bruce Knechtges

Special Effects

Dan Kolsrud

Assistant Director

K Lenna Kunkel

Production Associate

Tom Lantz

Special Effects

Robert Latham Brown

Unit Production Manager

Michael Laws

Electrician

Rick Lazzarini

Makeup

Melanie Levitt

Makeup

Clyde Lieberman

Song

George Llerena

Assistant Camera Operator

Mitch Lookabaugh

Grip

Lenny Macaluso

Song

Al Maclaury

Other

Eugene Marks

Music Editor

Terence Marsh

Production Designer

Grant Mccune

Visual Effects

Russell Mcelhannon

Special Effects

Richard Mckenzie

Set Designer

Jack Mclean

Electrician

Nick Mclean

Director Of Photography

Nick Mclean

Dp/Cinematographer

Steve Mclean

Camera Assistant

Gregory L Mcmurry

Video

Gregory L Mcmurry

Video Playback

Michael John Meehan

Location Manager

Thomas Meehan

Screenplay

Dave Merill

Dolly Grip

Harold Michelson

Art Director

Alvah J Miller

Motion Control

John Morris

Music

Terri Nenn

Song

Greg Nestor

Swing Gang

Ben Nye Jr.

Makeup Supervisor

Michael O'shea

Camera Operator

Ray Oberg

Special Effects

Peter Olexiewicz

Special Effects

Jeffrey Osborne

Song Performer

Ray Osburn

Driver

Tom Pahk

Visual Effects

Ramon Pahoyo

Craft Service

Victor Perez

Production Assistant

Victor Perez

Lighting Technician

Jeff Pescetto

Song

Glad Pickering

Sound Editor

James J Pickering

Other

Don Pike

Costumes

Julie Pitkanen

Script Supervisor

Jerry Pooler

Photography

Jim Porter

Electrician

Lambert Powell

Special Effects

Tom Prosser

Special Effects

Robert Ramage

Special Effects

Richard Ratliff

Special Effects

David Rau

Makeup

Ken Reed

Foreman

Richard Reedy

Driver

Matt Reid

Song

Christopher Rigby

Driver

Ray Robinson

Special Effects

Sharon Robinson

Song

Chris Ross

Visual Effects

Jay Roth

Visual Effects

David Rubin

Casting

Bill Rustic

Grip

Gary Rydstrom

Sound Design

Richie Sambora

Song

Charles J.d. Schlissel

Production Assistant

Suzy Schneider

Visual Effects

Norman B Schwartz

Digital Effects Supervisor

Bill Shepard

Casting

Monty Shook

Special Effects

John Shourt

Animator

William Shourt

Special Effects

Earl Shubin

Swing Gang

Charmaine Nash Simmons

Costume Supervisor

George Simpson

Sound Editor

Ronald Sinclair

Sound Editor

Gloria Sklerov

Song

Doug E Smith

Motion Control

Nicholas C Smith

Editing

Peter Sorel

Photography

David Sosalla

Visual Effects

Mike Spehar

Electrician

Bruce Spellman

Grip

Tom Stern

Lighting Technician

James Steube

Cable Operator

Smokey Stover

Visual Effects

Eben Stromquist

Digital Effects Supervisor

Laurie Stuebe

Accounting Assistant

John Sullivan

Motion Control

Gary Summers

Sound

Ezra Swerdlow

Coproducer

Joji Tani

Makeup

Richard Tashjian

Driver

Bill Taylor

Matte Painter

Dione Taylor

Hair

Randy Thom

Sound Design

Randy Thom

Sound

Ron Thornton

Other

Dennie Thorpe

Foley Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
Det våras för rymden, Space Balls, folle histoire de l'espace
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Satire
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1987
Production Company
James Steube
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Yuma, Arizona, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

Spaceballs


Born in Brooklyn, a former entertainer in the Catskills, and writer for Sid Caesar's landmark TV series Your Show of Shows in the 1950s, Mel Brooks always carried into his film work the influence of Jewish humor, television sketch comedy, and the kind of low vulgarity that makes critics groan but that audiences love. His career up to this point has been bracketed by what many consider his best film, The Producers (1968), and the mega-hit Broadway show he adapted from that movie in 2001. In between he has tackled, with varying degrees of success, movie genres of all types, spoofing Westerns (Blazing Saddles, 1974), the classic Universal horror films (Young Frankenstein, 1974; Dracula: Dead and Loving It, 1995), pre-sound films (Silent Movie, 1976), Hitchcock (High Anxiety, 1978), and historical costume epics (History of the World: Part I, 1981; Robin Hood: Men in Tights, 1993). And although To Be or Not to Be (1983), in which he co-starred with wife Anne Bancroft, was only produced by him and directed by Alan Johnson, the picture bears so much of the Brooks stamp that he is often credited - or more accurately, slammed - for this remake of Ernst Lubitsch's immortal 1942 anti-Nazi comedy.

Critics generally conceded that Spaceballs, his 1987 parody of the space adventure genre (particularly Star Wars, 1977), arrived about a decade too late and the jokes were stale. But audiences didn't seem to agree. Brooks' most expensive film up to that point ($22.7 million), it earned $20 million in its first two weeks of release. Its total take has been around $39 million in theaters and nearly half that in video rentals.

Brooks plays President Skroob (an anagram of his own name), the evil leader of the planet Spaceballs, who along with his henchman Dark Helmut, plots to kidnap Princess Vespa of the planet Druidia ("the first Druish princess") and hold her ransom in exchange for her home planet's vastly cleaner air. Vespa is eventually rescued by Captain Lone Starr and his half-man, half-dog sidekick Barf ("I'm my own best friend."). Brooks also plays the tiny, Yoda-like character called Yogurt who is given to such declarations as "May the Schwartz be with you!"

Although Star Wars is the main target, viewers will recognize take-offs on scenes from Planet of the Apes (1968), Alien (1979), the Star Trek TV series, and even a classic cartoon, One Froggy Evening (1955). Brooks has no compunction about throwing everything, including the kitchen sink, into his movie parodies and he tells one story that affirms this practice. In a 1987 interview in Vogue, Brooks said that when he was preparing High Anxiety, he went to Alfred Hitchcock and said, "I'm going to do The Birds [1963]; I'm going to do the shower!" Hitchcock allegedly told him, "I loved Blazing Saddles. I trust you. I trust your intelligence. And please, no holds barred. Do it all." Not content with letting that evidence of approval stand, Brooks went on to say he showed the veteran director a rough cut of the picture, and when Hitchcock's name came on the screen, "he actually dabbed his eyes."

Not everyone finds Brook' work quite so touching, not even the stars of his pictures, at least not at first. Daphne Zuniga, who portrays Vespa in Spaceballs, said she found his movie parodies "too crass and just not funny," but gained a different perspective after working with him. "I have this image of Mel as totally wacko and out to lunch. And he is. But he's also really perceptive, real sensitive in ways that make actors respond."

Director: Mel Brooks
Producer: Mel Brooks
Screenplay: Mel Brooks, Thomas Meehan, Ronny Graham
Cinematography: Nick McLean
Editing: Conrad Buff
Art Direction: Harold Michelson
Original Music: Dick Bauerle, Mel Brooks, Clyde Lieberman, John Morris, Jeffrey Pescetto
Cast: Bill Pullman (Lone Starr), Daphne Zuniga (Vespa), John Candy (Barf), Rick Moranis (Dark Helmut), Joan Rivers (voice of the robot Dot Matrix).
C-96m. Letterboxed.

by Rob Nixon
Spaceballs

Spaceballs

Born in Brooklyn, a former entertainer in the Catskills, and writer for Sid Caesar's landmark TV series Your Show of Shows in the 1950s, Mel Brooks always carried into his film work the influence of Jewish humor, television sketch comedy, and the kind of low vulgarity that makes critics groan but that audiences love. His career up to this point has been bracketed by what many consider his best film, The Producers (1968), and the mega-hit Broadway show he adapted from that movie in 2001. In between he has tackled, with varying degrees of success, movie genres of all types, spoofing Westerns (Blazing Saddles, 1974), the classic Universal horror films (Young Frankenstein, 1974; Dracula: Dead and Loving It, 1995), pre-sound films (Silent Movie, 1976), Hitchcock (High Anxiety, 1978), and historical costume epics (History of the World: Part I, 1981; Robin Hood: Men in Tights, 1993). And although To Be or Not to Be (1983), in which he co-starred with wife Anne Bancroft, was only produced by him and directed by Alan Johnson, the picture bears so much of the Brooks stamp that he is often credited - or more accurately, slammed - for this remake of Ernst Lubitsch's immortal 1942 anti-Nazi comedy. Critics generally conceded that Spaceballs, his 1987 parody of the space adventure genre (particularly Star Wars, 1977), arrived about a decade too late and the jokes were stale. But audiences didn't seem to agree. Brooks' most expensive film up to that point ($22.7 million), it earned $20 million in its first two weeks of release. Its total take has been around $39 million in theaters and nearly half that in video rentals. Brooks plays President Skroob (an anagram of his own name), the evil leader of the planet Spaceballs, who along with his henchman Dark Helmut, plots to kidnap Princess Vespa of the planet Druidia ("the first Druish princess") and hold her ransom in exchange for her home planet's vastly cleaner air. Vespa is eventually rescued by Captain Lone Starr and his half-man, half-dog sidekick Barf ("I'm my own best friend."). Brooks also plays the tiny, Yoda-like character called Yogurt who is given to such declarations as "May the Schwartz be with you!" Although Star Wars is the main target, viewers will recognize take-offs on scenes from Planet of the Apes (1968), Alien (1979), the Star Trek TV series, and even a classic cartoon, One Froggy Evening (1955). Brooks has no compunction about throwing everything, including the kitchen sink, into his movie parodies and he tells one story that affirms this practice. In a 1987 interview in Vogue, Brooks said that when he was preparing High Anxiety, he went to Alfred Hitchcock and said, "I'm going to do The Birds [1963]; I'm going to do the shower!" Hitchcock allegedly told him, "I loved Blazing Saddles. I trust you. I trust your intelligence. And please, no holds barred. Do it all." Not content with letting that evidence of approval stand, Brooks went on to say he showed the veteran director a rough cut of the picture, and when Hitchcock's name came on the screen, "he actually dabbed his eyes." Not everyone finds Brook' work quite so touching, not even the stars of his pictures, at least not at first. Daphne Zuniga, who portrays Vespa in Spaceballs, said she found his movie parodies "too crass and just not funny," but gained a different perspective after working with him. "I have this image of Mel as totally wacko and out to lunch. And he is. But he's also really perceptive, real sensitive in ways that make actors respond." Director: Mel Brooks Producer: Mel Brooks Screenplay: Mel Brooks, Thomas Meehan, Ronny Graham Cinematography: Nick McLean Editing: Conrad Buff Art Direction: Harold Michelson Original Music: Dick Bauerle, Mel Brooks, Clyde Lieberman, John Morris, Jeffrey Pescetto Cast: Bill Pullman (Lone Starr), Daphne Zuniga (Vespa), John Candy (Barf), Rick Moranis (Dark Helmut), Joan Rivers (voice of the robot Dot Matrix). C-96m. Letterboxed. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1987

Released in United States on Video September 1987

Began shooting October 28, 1986.

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1987

Released in United States on Video September 1987