Return of the Seven


1h 35m 1966
Return of the Seven

Brief Synopsis

A notorious gunman organizes a team of specialists to save Mexican villagers from an insane rancher.

Film Details

Also Known As
El regreso de los siete magníficos
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Western
Sequel
Release Date
Jan 1966
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Oct 1966
Production Company
C. B. Films; Mirisch Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Alicante,Spain; Colmenar de Oreja,Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Fifty gunmen force all of the men in a small Mexican village to ride off with them into the desert. Among the captured farmers is Chico, who years before was one of seven men responsible for ridding the village of a tyrannical bandit. Chico's wife, Petra, seeks out the other members of the band of whom only two, Chris and Vin, survive; and she begs them to save the village once more. To replace the deceased members of the group, Chris buys the release of Frank and Luis, held in the local jail, and also recruits Colbee, a ladies' man, and Manuel, a young bullfighter. The six men discover that the missing villagers are being used as slave labor to rebuild a desert village and church as a memorial to the dead sons of wealthy rancher Lorca. In a surprise attack, the six force Lorca's men to leave, and, with Chico, prepare for a counterattack. The cowed farmers offer no assistance, but the seven defenders successfully repulse Lorca's initial attack. The rancher then gathers all of the gunmen on his land to rout the seven. The situation seems bleak until Manuel discovers a supply of dynamite which the seven use in a counteroffensive. They are eventually overrun, but Chris emerges victorious from a shootout with Lorca. The rancher's gang flee, leaving Frank, Luis, and Manuel dead in the fighting. Chico plans to resettle the village on Lorca's fertile land, and Colbee remains to help teach the villagers how to defend themselves against future attacks. Chris and Vin once more ride off as the church bell rings seven times.

Film Details

Also Known As
El regreso de los siete magníficos
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Western
Sequel
Release Date
Jan 1966
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Oct 1966
Production Company
C. B. Films; Mirisch Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Alicante,Spain; Colmenar de Oreja,Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Score

1967

Articles

Return of the Seven


To be absolutely technical, it's the return of the one, since Yul Brynner was the only member of the original, The Magnificent Seven (1960), to come back for the first sequel. And even he did not return for the remaining two, Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969) and The Magnificent Seven Ride (1972). Luckily Return of the Magnificent Seven (1966), which is also known as Return of the Seven, could also boast the return of another vital element from the original ­ composer Elmer Bernstein, whose score for the classic western is built around one of the most famous and recognizable musical themes in movie history. Bernstein's work covered about every genre and style of Hollywood film, from romances to stark dramas to comedies, including his Academy Award-winning score for Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). He also had a particular affinity for action movies and Westerns, scoring a number of late John Wayne features, as well as The Great Escape (1963), From Noon Till Three (1976) and John Ford's final film, Seven Women (1966).

As in the first film of this series, Brynner leads a group of mercenaries hired to save a poor Mexican village. In this edition, an army of bandits has rounded up all the males in the village for use as slave labor. And once again, Brynner and the boys beat seemingly insurmountable odds to rout the 100-strong enemy and restore peace and happiness to the village. The original film was based on Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai (1954), not surprising, since the Japanese director had acknowledged his debt to the Hollywood western. The Magnificent Seven, however, left out the social background Kurosawa gave his characters in favor of fore fronting the action sequences. In this sequel, screenwriter Larry Cohen works to restore that human dimension by weaving into the story the characters' own accounts of their lives.

Cohen's work here is rather different than that for which he would become better known in later years. Coming off a stint as writer for the TV series The Fugitive, this was his first feature film script. He followed it up with several action stories for both film and TV before he hit cult movie success as writer and director of the horror flick It's Alive! (1974). That film, and the sequels that followed, established Cohen as auteur of over-the-top, often blackly humorous fright fests, including Q, the Winged Serpent (1982), The Stuff (1985) and Bette Davis' final film, Wicked Stepmother (1989).

Director Burt Kennedy has much more solid Western credentials. He broke into film work in the 1950s as a screenwriter for Budd Boetticher and other directors in this genre and made his directing debut in the early 60s. Among his best-known Westerns are The Rounders (1965) and The War Wagon (1967). In later years, he veered away a bit from tough action toward more relaxed, humorous near-parodies such as Support Your Local Sheriff (1969) and the Frank Sinatra gunslinger spoof Dirty Dingus McGee (1970).

Producer: Robert Goodstein (associate producer), Ted Richmond
Director: Burt Kennedy
Screenplay: Larry Cohen
Cinematography: Paul Vogel
Film Editing: Bert Bates
Original Music: Elmer Bernstein
Cast: Yul Brynner (Chris Adams), Robert Fuller (Vin), Julián Mateos (Chico), Warren Oates (Colbee), Claude Akins (Frank), Fernando Rey (Priest), Jordan Christopher (Manuel).
C-95m.

by Rob Nixon

Return Of The Seven

Return of the Seven

To be absolutely technical, it's the return of the one, since Yul Brynner was the only member of the original, The Magnificent Seven (1960), to come back for the first sequel. And even he did not return for the remaining two, Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969) and The Magnificent Seven Ride (1972). Luckily Return of the Magnificent Seven (1966), which is also known as Return of the Seven, could also boast the return of another vital element from the original ­ composer Elmer Bernstein, whose score for the classic western is built around one of the most famous and recognizable musical themes in movie history. Bernstein's work covered about every genre and style of Hollywood film, from romances to stark dramas to comedies, including his Academy Award-winning score for Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). He also had a particular affinity for action movies and Westerns, scoring a number of late John Wayne features, as well as The Great Escape (1963), From Noon Till Three (1976) and John Ford's final film, Seven Women (1966). As in the first film of this series, Brynner leads a group of mercenaries hired to save a poor Mexican village. In this edition, an army of bandits has rounded up all the males in the village for use as slave labor. And once again, Brynner and the boys beat seemingly insurmountable odds to rout the 100-strong enemy and restore peace and happiness to the village. The original film was based on Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai (1954), not surprising, since the Japanese director had acknowledged his debt to the Hollywood western. The Magnificent Seven, however, left out the social background Kurosawa gave his characters in favor of fore fronting the action sequences. In this sequel, screenwriter Larry Cohen works to restore that human dimension by weaving into the story the characters' own accounts of their lives. Cohen's work here is rather different than that for which he would become better known in later years. Coming off a stint as writer for the TV series The Fugitive, this was his first feature film script. He followed it up with several action stories for both film and TV before he hit cult movie success as writer and director of the horror flick It's Alive! (1974). That film, and the sequels that followed, established Cohen as auteur of over-the-top, often blackly humorous fright fests, including Q, the Winged Serpent (1982), The Stuff (1985) and Bette Davis' final film, Wicked Stepmother (1989). Director Burt Kennedy has much more solid Western credentials. He broke into film work in the 1950s as a screenwriter for Budd Boetticher and other directors in this genre and made his directing debut in the early 60s. Among his best-known Westerns are The Rounders (1965) and The War Wagon (1967). In later years, he veered away a bit from tough action toward more relaxed, humorous near-parodies such as Support Your Local Sheriff (1969) and the Frank Sinatra gunslinger spoof Dirty Dingus McGee (1970). Producer: Robert Goodstein (associate producer), Ted Richmond Director: Burt Kennedy Screenplay: Larry Cohen Cinematography: Paul Vogel Film Editing: Bert Bates Original Music: Elmer Bernstein Cast: Yul Brynner (Chris Adams), Robert Fuller (Vin), Julián Mateos (Chico), Warren Oates (Colbee), Claude Akins (Frank), Fernando Rey (Priest), Jordan Christopher (Manuel). C-95m. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

I heard you were riding shotgun for the Overland Stage.
- Vin
I was. My doctor told me to quit. For my health.
- Chris
Why?
- Vin
Too much lead in the air.
- Chris
Well I'll be damned.
- Chris
I doubt that. I doubt that very much.
- Vin

Trivia

Notes

The film was shot on location in Alicante and Colmenar de Oreja, Spain and opened in Madrid in February 1967 under the title El regreso de los siete magníficos. Return of the Seven was the second "Magnificent Seven" film. For additional information on the series, see the entry for first in the series, The Magnificent Seven (1960).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1966

Sequel to "The Magnificent Seven" (1960) directed by John Sturges.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1966