Audrey Rose


1h 52m 1977
Audrey Rose

Brief Synopsis

A married couple fear their daughter is the reincarnation of a girl killed in a terrible accident.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Horror
Mystery
Thriller
Fantasy
Release Date
1977
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

Janice and Bill Templeton are the parents of well-adjusted preteen Ivy. Their happy home life is disrupted by the arrival of mysterious stranger, Elliott Hoover. At first mistaken for a potential child molester, Hoover explains that his obsessive interest in young Ivy is because he believes she is the reincarnation of his own child, who died in a horrible accident.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Horror
Mystery
Thriller
Fantasy
Release Date
1977
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

Robert Wise (1914-2005)


Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.)

Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films.

Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945).

Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox.

At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959).

Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story.

The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963).

by Roger Fristoe
Robert Wise (1914-2005)

Robert Wise (1914-2005)

Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.) Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films. Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945). Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox. At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959). Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story. The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963). by Roger Fristoe

Audrey Rose - AUDREY ROSE


Director Robert Wise is best known for his involvement in two of film's most successful musicals, West Side Story (1961) and The Sound of Music (1965). For movie buffs, however, his greatest achievements were in the horror genre for flicks such as The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), and The Haunting (1963). In 1977 Wise carried on this tradition with Audrey Rose, an unsettling tale about the doomed reincarnated soul of a little girl. Starring Anthony Hopkins, Marsha Mason, and newcomer Susan Swift, the film is based on the novel of the same name by Frank De Felitta, who also penned the script. He attributed the idea for the story to an otherworldly experience of his own child. At six years old, De Felitta's son began playing ragtime tunes on the piano one day, an instrument he had never learned. Convinced his son's ability was the result of an "incarnation leak", De Felitta began exploring the concept of reincarnation in his writing.

Audrey Rose takes a much darker turn than De Felitta's strange experience with his six-year-old son; it is the story of an eleven-year old girl named Ivy Templeton who begins to have horrific visions of a violent death. Her parents, played by Marsha Mason and John Beck, are at a loss as to the origins of her behavior, until a mysterious stranger - Hopkins--turns up. The stranger explains that his daughter, named Audrey Rose, died in a tragic accident moments before Ivy's birth. Hopkins' contention is that Ivy is the reincarnated soul of his dead child.

"I don't think we're going to prove reincarnation in this picture, but I'm very open to the whole possibility of the supernatural, the paranormal, the possibility of dimensions out there," Wise commented during filming in 1976. Anticipating a heady task in persuading his audience of these concepts, Wise took an unprecedented approach to production; he built in one week of rehearsal prior to shooting for the four leads. "It's always a big help when you have a chance to do that, the director stated in Robert Wise on His Films. "Not just read through the script, but actually rehearse the scenes to see how they play. The reason you don't get to do that in movies is because it costs money.....That's very hard for studios to accept. In this particular instance, it just meant paying those four [Hopkins, Beck, Mason & Swift] for an additional week. Audrey Rose is the only film in which I had a full week of rehearsal before shooting."

Susan Swift, who played the role of Ivy Templeton/Audrey Rose, was an inexperienced actor making her film debut in a very challenging part so Wise hired a specialized acting coach to work with her. Hopkins and Mason, both seasoned stage actors, were open to the experimentalist environment of the film - Wise recalls them as "very much into other-world thinking." Hopkins recalled in his biography by Quentin Falk that Mason was "a much more fervent seeker of truth than I am or was. I accept anything now and don't search as much as I used to. Then I was caught up with all that stuff, such as the manifestation and spiritualization of individual particles of God."

Both Los Angeles and New York City were used for locations in Audrey Rose. The scene where Hopkins informs Beck and Mason about his dead daughter took place at Valentino's on Pico, a popular restaurant in L.A. The car crash sequence was filmed on an unopened stretch of highway in New Jersey and a scene at the zoo and the exterior of Ivy's school were shot in New York.

Wise took great pains to achieve a certain balance in Audrey Rose explaining, "Mine is a prepared approach with ample room for improvising as we go along." The director described one example of this improvisation in Robert Wise on His Films: "We had a sequence in the bedroom between Marsha Mason and John Beck in which they get to a very high, angry pitch, and it wasn't right somehow as written in the script. I suggested that at the end of the day's shooting we get John and Marsha into the bedroom and just let them improvise the scene to see what they could come up with. They got into a really tough argument, much better than the one we had. Frank De Felitta had a tape recorder and he taped everything. Later, he went back to his office and rewrote the entire scene, taking elements that the actors had come up with in the improvisation. That's one of the few times I've ever done that kind of thing and it worked."

Audrey Rose was evenly panned and praised following its release; even almost twenty-five years later, critics have a hard time deciding if Audrey Rose was a triumph or failure for Wise. Certainly the film had some overt competition at the time of its release: Audrey Rose was a markedly different child character than those found in The Exorcist (1973) or The Omen (1976). And Wise was not seeking to shock his audience; instead, he was inviting them to explore a darker side of the unknown. Incidentally, the picture of Audrey Rose on the paperback version of De Felitta's novel is a photograph of a young Brooke Shields. Shields, however, obviously had no part in the film.

Producer: Joe Wizan, Frank De Felitta
Director: Robert Wise
Screenplay: Frank De Felitta
Art Direction: Harry Horner Cinematography: Victor J. Kemper
Editing: Carl Kress
Music: Michael Small
Cast: Marsha Mason (Janice Templeton), Anthony Hopkins (Elliot Hoover), John Beck (Bill Templeton), Susan Swift (Ivy Templeton), Norman Lloyd (Dr. Steven Lipscomb), John Hillerman (Scott Velie), Robert Walden (Brice Mock).
C-114m.

by Eleanor Quin

Audrey Rose - AUDREY ROSE

Director Robert Wise is best known for his involvement in two of film's most successful musicals, West Side Story (1961) and The Sound of Music (1965). For movie buffs, however, his greatest achievements were in the horror genre for flicks such as The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), and The Haunting (1963). In 1977 Wise carried on this tradition with Audrey Rose, an unsettling tale about the doomed reincarnated soul of a little girl. Starring Anthony Hopkins, Marsha Mason, and newcomer Susan Swift, the film is based on the novel of the same name by Frank De Felitta, who also penned the script. He attributed the idea for the story to an otherworldly experience of his own child. At six years old, De Felitta's son began playing ragtime tunes on the piano one day, an instrument he had never learned. Convinced his son's ability was the result of an "incarnation leak", De Felitta began exploring the concept of reincarnation in his writing. Audrey Rose takes a much darker turn than De Felitta's strange experience with his six-year-old son; it is the story of an eleven-year old girl named Ivy Templeton who begins to have horrific visions of a violent death. Her parents, played by Marsha Mason and John Beck, are at a loss as to the origins of her behavior, until a mysterious stranger - Hopkins--turns up. The stranger explains that his daughter, named Audrey Rose, died in a tragic accident moments before Ivy's birth. Hopkins' contention is that Ivy is the reincarnated soul of his dead child. "I don't think we're going to prove reincarnation in this picture, but I'm very open to the whole possibility of the supernatural, the paranormal, the possibility of dimensions out there," Wise commented during filming in 1976. Anticipating a heady task in persuading his audience of these concepts, Wise took an unprecedented approach to production; he built in one week of rehearsal prior to shooting for the four leads. "It's always a big help when you have a chance to do that, the director stated in Robert Wise on His Films. "Not just read through the script, but actually rehearse the scenes to see how they play. The reason you don't get to do that in movies is because it costs money.....That's very hard for studios to accept. In this particular instance, it just meant paying those four [Hopkins, Beck, Mason & Swift] for an additional week. Audrey Rose is the only film in which I had a full week of rehearsal before shooting." Susan Swift, who played the role of Ivy Templeton/Audrey Rose, was an inexperienced actor making her film debut in a very challenging part so Wise hired a specialized acting coach to work with her. Hopkins and Mason, both seasoned stage actors, were open to the experimentalist environment of the film - Wise recalls them as "very much into other-world thinking." Hopkins recalled in his biography by Quentin Falk that Mason was "a much more fervent seeker of truth than I am or was. I accept anything now and don't search as much as I used to. Then I was caught up with all that stuff, such as the manifestation and spiritualization of individual particles of God." Both Los Angeles and New York City were used for locations in Audrey Rose. The scene where Hopkins informs Beck and Mason about his dead daughter took place at Valentino's on Pico, a popular restaurant in L.A. The car crash sequence was filmed on an unopened stretch of highway in New Jersey and a scene at the zoo and the exterior of Ivy's school were shot in New York. Wise took great pains to achieve a certain balance in Audrey Rose explaining, "Mine is a prepared approach with ample room for improvising as we go along." The director described one example of this improvisation in Robert Wise on His Films: "We had a sequence in the bedroom between Marsha Mason and John Beck in which they get to a very high, angry pitch, and it wasn't right somehow as written in the script. I suggested that at the end of the day's shooting we get John and Marsha into the bedroom and just let them improvise the scene to see what they could come up with. They got into a really tough argument, much better than the one we had. Frank De Felitta had a tape recorder and he taped everything. Later, he went back to his office and rewrote the entire scene, taking elements that the actors had come up with in the improvisation. That's one of the few times I've ever done that kind of thing and it worked." Audrey Rose was evenly panned and praised following its release; even almost twenty-five years later, critics have a hard time deciding if Audrey Rose was a triumph or failure for Wise. Certainly the film had some overt competition at the time of its release: Audrey Rose was a markedly different child character than those found in The Exorcist (1973) or The Omen (1976). And Wise was not seeking to shock his audience; instead, he was inviting them to explore a darker side of the unknown. Incidentally, the picture of Audrey Rose on the paperback version of De Felitta's novel is a photograph of a young Brooke Shields. Shields, however, obviously had no part in the film. Producer: Joe Wizan, Frank De Felitta Director: Robert Wise Screenplay: Frank De Felitta Art Direction: Harry Horner Cinematography: Victor J. Kemper Editing: Carl Kress Music: Michael Small Cast: Marsha Mason (Janice Templeton), Anthony Hopkins (Elliot Hoover), John Beck (Bill Templeton), Susan Swift (Ivy Templeton), Norman Lloyd (Dr. Steven Lipscomb), John Hillerman (Scott Velie), Robert Walden (Brice Mock). C-114m. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Brooke Shields screen tested for the title role.

According to the book, "The Case for Reincarnation" by Joe Fisher, the screenplay for "Audrey Rose" was inspired by an actual incident in author De Felitta's life. Hearing expert ragtime piano coming from his family's music room, he was astonished to discover it was being produced by his six-year-old son, who had never had a music lesson. "My fingers are doing it by themselves, Daddy!", the boy said. "Isn't it wonderful?" The experience set him to contemplating the possibility of reincarnation.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video August 28, 2001

Released in United States Spring April 6, 1977

Released in United States Spring April 6, 1977

Released in United States on Video August 28, 2001