After the Fox


1h 43m 1966
After the Fox

Brief Synopsis

A notorious con man poses as a film director to front a major caper.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Also Known As
Caccia alla volpe
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Jan 1966
Premiere Information
New York opening: 23 Dec 1966
Production Company
Compagnia Cinematografica Montoro; Delegate Productions; Nancy Enterprises
Distribution Company
United Artists
Country
United States
Location
Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Relaxing in jail for the ninth time in 11 years, Aldo Vanucci, alias "The Fox," remains unmoved by a discussion among fellow inmates Pollo, Carlo, and Siepi about a recent gold bullion robbery in Cairo valued at $3 million. However, when he hears rumors that his younger sister Gina has become a girl of the streets, he switches places with the prison doctor who has come to examine him and once again returns to society. Racing to Rome, he catches Gina trying to pick up a fat, middle-aged man on the street. Enraged, Aldo attacks the man, only to discover that his sister is making a cinéma vérité film. The incident provides Aldo with an inspirational idea for helping archcriminal Okra smuggle the stolen gold bullion into Italy. Posing as "new wave" director Federico Fabrizi, Aldo hijacks some motion picture equipment, hires a fading American matinee idol, Tony Powell, as his star, and sets up for location filming at a small Mediterranean fishing village where the bullion is to be brought in by ship from Cairo. He plans to incorporate the landing of the gold into the plot of his film and obtains the assistance of the local police chief. Everything runs smoothly until Tony's manager, Harry Granoff, tips off the police, and Okra pulls a last-minute double-cross which lands everybody in jail after a long chase involving the police and Interpol. To save Gina, Tony, and the innocent villagers, Aldo confesses, but not before hearing his film acclaimed as "the work of a primitive genius." Aldo is again sent back to prison with a 5-year sentence; but, since he has made a date for the following April, he undertakes to escape again.

Photo Collections

After the Fox - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from After the Fox (1966), starring Peter Sellers and Victor Mature. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Film Details

Also Known As
Caccia alla volpe
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Jan 1966
Premiere Information
New York opening: 23 Dec 1966
Production Company
Compagnia Cinematografica Montoro; Delegate Productions; Nancy Enterprises
Distribution Company
United Artists
Country
United States
Location
Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

After the Fox


Most avid fans of Italian cinema may already be familiar with such Vittorio De Sica classics as The Bicycle Thief (1948), Miracle in Milan (1951) and The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1971). In stark contrast to those, After the Fox (1966) is an anomaly in De Sica's career - a comedy starring Peter Sellers, then at the height of his international career. Sellers plays "the Fox," a somewhat inept character reminiscent of the famous Inspector Clouseau of the Pink Panther comedies.

An incompetent thief, "the Fox" breaks out of jail to arrange for the transfer of $3 million in gold from Cairo to Rome. Hiding in various disguises (prison doctor, Italian policeman, New Wave film director, to name a few), Fox cooks up a plan to "film" a movie in which the gold is transferred in a "scene." He crosses paths with an aging star played by none other than Victor Mature, who came out of retirement to poke fun at his own screen persona.

In an odd twist of casting, Britt Ekland, the Swedish model and ingenue, plays Fox's sister, donning a brunette wig to play an Italian. Sellers was responsible for the hiring of Ekland, who was then the second Mrs. Sellers. The final swingin' '60s touch is provided by Burt Bacharach's irresistible score featuring a duet between the Hollies and Peter Sellers on the theme song.

Unfortunately, during the filming Sellers was neurotic and unpredictable. Days after production began, he tried to have De Sica removed from the picture and argued constantly with Ekland. One evening, he even threw a chair at Ekland, who took temporary refuge in the rented home of Neil Simon, who was responsible for the screenplay of After the Fox.

Simon later recalled his screenwriting debut as an experience reminiscent of a Marx Brothers comedy and has acknowledged that the film retains a "cult" following. As Simon notes in his autobiography, De Sica always began shooting late in the day and had a penchant for phoning the local casino to place bets. He and his Italian crew also entertained a host of superstitions on the set -- at one point, when a frustrated Mature threw his script into the ocean, a priest was summoned to bless the soggy sheets.

After the Fox takes its place among the unofficial genre of wacky '60s comedies (such as Candy, 1968; The Magic Christian, 1969; Skidoo, 1968) that feature an unlikely combination of director, actors and offbeat storyline. The results make for a unique, if bizarre, testament to the melting pot that was '60s culture.

Producer: John Bryan, Maurizio Lodi-Fe
Director: Vittorio De Sica
Screenplay: Neil Simon, Cesare Zavattini
Cinematography: Leonida Barboni
Editing: Russell Lloyd
Music: Burt Bacharach
Cast: Peter Sellers (Aldo Vanucci/Federico Fabrizi), Victor Mature (Tony Powell), Britt Ekland (Gina Romantica), Martin Balsam (Harry), Akim Tamiroff (Okra), Paolo Stoppa (Polio), Tino Buazzelli (Siepi), Maurice Denham (Chief of Interpol).
C-104m. Letterboxed.

by Genevieve McGillicuddy
After The Fox

After the Fox

Most avid fans of Italian cinema may already be familiar with such Vittorio De Sica classics as The Bicycle Thief (1948), Miracle in Milan (1951) and The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1971). In stark contrast to those, After the Fox (1966) is an anomaly in De Sica's career - a comedy starring Peter Sellers, then at the height of his international career. Sellers plays "the Fox," a somewhat inept character reminiscent of the famous Inspector Clouseau of the Pink Panther comedies. An incompetent thief, "the Fox" breaks out of jail to arrange for the transfer of $3 million in gold from Cairo to Rome. Hiding in various disguises (prison doctor, Italian policeman, New Wave film director, to name a few), Fox cooks up a plan to "film" a movie in which the gold is transferred in a "scene." He crosses paths with an aging star played by none other than Victor Mature, who came out of retirement to poke fun at his own screen persona. In an odd twist of casting, Britt Ekland, the Swedish model and ingenue, plays Fox's sister, donning a brunette wig to play an Italian. Sellers was responsible for the hiring of Ekland, who was then the second Mrs. Sellers. The final swingin' '60s touch is provided by Burt Bacharach's irresistible score featuring a duet between the Hollies and Peter Sellers on the theme song. Unfortunately, during the filming Sellers was neurotic and unpredictable. Days after production began, he tried to have De Sica removed from the picture and argued constantly with Ekland. One evening, he even threw a chair at Ekland, who took temporary refuge in the rented home of Neil Simon, who was responsible for the screenplay of After the Fox. Simon later recalled his screenwriting debut as an experience reminiscent of a Marx Brothers comedy and has acknowledged that the film retains a "cult" following. As Simon notes in his autobiography, De Sica always began shooting late in the day and had a penchant for phoning the local casino to place bets. He and his Italian crew also entertained a host of superstitions on the set -- at one point, when a frustrated Mature threw his script into the ocean, a priest was summoned to bless the soggy sheets. After the Fox takes its place among the unofficial genre of wacky '60s comedies (such as Candy, 1968; The Magic Christian, 1969; Skidoo, 1968) that feature an unlikely combination of director, actors and offbeat storyline. The results make for a unique, if bizarre, testament to the melting pot that was '60s culture. Producer: John Bryan, Maurizio Lodi-Fe Director: Vittorio De Sica Screenplay: Neil Simon, Cesare Zavattini Cinematography: Leonida Barboni Editing: Russell Lloyd Music: Burt Bacharach Cast: Peter Sellers (Aldo Vanucci/Federico Fabrizi), Victor Mature (Tony Powell), Britt Ekland (Gina Romantica), Martin Balsam (Harry), Akim Tamiroff (Okra), Paolo Stoppa (Polio), Tino Buazzelli (Siepi), Maurice Denham (Chief of Interpol). C-104m. Letterboxed. by Genevieve McGillicuddy

Quotes

Trivia

Musicians in the band on the soundtrack included bassist Jack Bruce and Burt Bacharach on piano.

Notes

Filmed in Italy. Released in Great Britain and Italy in 1966. Italian title: Caccia alla volpe.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1966

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1966