Roadie


1h 45m 1980

Brief Synopsis

Travis is a Texas truck driver who falls for rock groupie and roadie Lola Bouilabase whose main ambition is to sleep with rocker Alice Cooper. When Lola hears Cooper's band is on tour, she tries to catch up with them and Travis follows her. On the road, the two of them meet several touring pop stars and Travis becomes a roadie himself, soon known as the greatest roadie of all time. Travis is faced with leaving this new success because he needs to go back to Texas for his sister's wedding.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
1980

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

Travis is a Texas truck driver who falls for rock groupie and roadie Lola Bouilabase whose main ambition is to sleep with rocker Alice Cooper. When Lola hears that Cooper's band is on tour, she tries to catch up with them and Travis follows her. On the road, the two of them meet several touring pop stars and Travis becomes a roadie himself, soon known as the "greatest roadie of all time." But Travis is faced with leaving this new success because he needs to go back to Texas for his sister's wedding.

Crew

Gary Alexander

Sound

Nickolas Ashford

Song

Pat Benatar

Song Performer

Ray Bensen

Song

Stephen Bishop

Song Performer

Gail Bixby

Costumes

George Bouillet

Photography

Joreen Bouillet

Photography

Eddie Brigati

Song

Jim Bullock

Sound Editor

Bruce Cannon

Production Assistant

June Carter

Song

Felix Cavaliere

Song

Crew Chamberlain

Sound

Michael Collins

Editor

Alice Cooper

Song

Alice Cooper

Song Performer

Steve Cropper

Song

Alvin Crow

Song

Alvin Crow

Song Performer

Joanne D'antonio

Sound Editor

Michael Dosco

Song

Jo Doster

Casting

Michael Dunn

Property Master

Yvonne Elliman

Song Performer

Joe Ely

Song

Joe Ely

Song Performer

Jay Ferguson

Song Performer

John Frazier

Special Effects

Richard Friedman

Set Decorator

Richard Bryce Goodman

Sound

Jered Edd Green

Costumes

Charles Grenzbach

Sound

Robert Grieve

Audio Consultant

Emmylou Harris

Song Performer

Lyn Hemmerdinger

Production Assistant

Ken Hirsch

Song

Bones Howe

Music Supervisor

Craig Hundley

Music

Gib Jaffe

Assistant Editor

Howard Jensen

Special Effects

Davey Johnstone

Song

Doug Jones

Photography

David Kelley

Production Assistant

Jan Kiesser

Camera Operator

Merle Kilgore

Song

Zalman King

Executive Producer

Zalman King

Story By

Zalman King

From Story

Luca Kouimelis

Script Supervisor

James Lance

Song

Edward Ledding

Assistant Director

Danny Levin

Song

Jerry Lee Lewis

Song Performer

Carol Littleton

Executive Editor

David Malloy

Song

Fred Mandel

Song

William L Manger

Sound Editor

James Medlin

From Story

James Medlin

Story By

James Medlin

Screenplay

Ronald N Miller

Song

Jeff Monday

Song

Mike Moschella

Makeup

David Myers

Other

David Myers

Director Of Photography

Rick Nielson

Song

Jeff Nightbyrd

Location Manager

Roy Orbison

Song

Roy Orbison

Song Performer

Richard L Oswald

Sound Editor

Conrad Palmisano

Stunt Coordinator

John Lewis Parker

Song

Teddy Pendergrass

Song Performer

Paul Peters

Production Designer

Carolyn Pfeiffer

Producer

Kate Pierson

Song

John Pommer

Associate Producer

John Pommer

Production Manager

Chris Price

Song

Eddie Rabbitt

Song Performer

Eddie Rabbitt

Song

Harry Rez

Key Grip

Tomy Ripareti

Song

Deborah Ross

Titles

Alan Rudolph

Story By

Alan Rudolph

From Story

Joyce Rudolph

Layout Artist

Sue Saad

Song

Sue Saad

Other

Fred Schneider

Song

Tommy Shaw

Song

Leslie Simonds

Song

Valerie Simpson

Song

J L Sinclair

Song

Tobi C Singleton

Production Coordinator

Bruce Alan Solow

Assistant Director

Even Stevens

Song

Keith Strickland

Song

Jerry Turnage

Hair

Joe Umphres

Production Assistant

Michael Ventura

Story By

Michael Ventura

From Story

Michael Ventura

Screenplay

Ed Villa

Props

Ron Volz

Other

Richard Wagner

Songs ("Road Rats" "Only Women Bleed")

Tom Walls

Editor

Edward Whiting

Song

Hank Williams Jr.

Song

Hank Williams Jr.

Song Performer

Cindy Wilson

Song

Ricky Wilson

Song

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
1980

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1980

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1980

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States June 1980

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1980