The Man with My Face


1h 26m 1951

Brief Synopsis

A man discovers that an evil twin has taken over his life.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Release Date
Jan 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Jun 1951
Production Company
Edward F. Gardner Productions
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Fort Morro Castle,Puerto Rico; Puerto Rico--Fort Morro Castle,United States; Puerto Rico, United States; Puerto Rico
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Man with My Face by Samuel W. Taylor (London, 1948).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Film Length
6,941ft

Synopsis

Chick Graham, an American accountant living in Puerto Rico with his wife Cora and their dog Jiggs, returns home from work one day to find a man who is his exact double, claiming to be him. The imposter, Albert Rand, appears to have convinced Cora and Cora's brother Buster Cox, who is also Chick's business partner, that Chick is lying when he declares that the man is an imposter. When Chick fails to prove his identity, he tries to punch Rand and Jiggs bites him. A police sergeant is summoned and Rand convinces him that he is Chick, using fake identification cards and falsifying Chick's signature. At the police station, the sergeant is about to take Chick into custody, when Rand's henchmen, dog trainer Meadows, sends his doberman pinscher to kill Chick. In the confusion, Chick escapes from the dog and the officer. Later, he wanders into a local bar and hears a radio report that a man fitting his description is on the run for stealing $1,000,000 worth of bonds in Florida. Fearing that the crowd will mistake him for the thief, Chick attempts to leave unnoticed, but salesman Al Grant, an acquaintance of Chick's, spots him and makes a business appointment for the following day. Knowing he needs to prove his identity, Chick contacts his old girlfriend Mary Davies. Together, with Mary's brother Walt, they realize that Cora, Rand and Buster are plotting against Chick, in order to frame him for stealing the money. The scheme, they believe, began when Buster, an Army mail clerk, intercepted mail between Mary and Chick, who at the time was serving in the Army, so he could introduce Chick to his sister Cora. The three then falsified checks, identification cards and signatures, and Meadows replaced Jiggs with another dog resembling him. The next morning, when Grant goes to Chick and Buster's office, Rand does not recognize him and Grant realizes that Rand must be the robber sought by the police. Grant attempts to extort Rand, but when he meets Rand and Buster later for the payoff, Meadows' doberman pinscher kills him. Later, after Mary receives a call to pick up a telegram outside her door, she, Walt and Chick look out the window and see Meadows with the doberman. While Walt distracts the dog, Chick runs out the front door and returns to his hotel room. The next day, Chick attempts to leave the island to sort things out in the United States, but the police are guarding every port, looking for the robber. That afternoon, as Chick walks the streets, Juanita, Rand's most recent girl friend, spots him, and believing that he is Rand, berates Chick for leaving her. Chick tells her of Rand's plot and convinces her that Rand was only using her as cover. Consequently, Juanita agrees to testify against Rand, but as soon as Chick leaves her apartment, Juanita is killed by Rand. The next morning, Meadows finds Chick, and threatening him with the doberman, forces him to go with him to Rand's hideout. Rand, posing as Chick, then calls Mary and arranges to meet her and Walt at a remote park. Mary realizes the voice on the phone was not Chick's and notifies the police. At the hideout, Cora begs Chick to punish her for her betrayal, but Chick ignores her and Cora breaks down. Rand interrupts and orders Meadows to lock Chick in the bedroom with the dog. Meanwhile, Buster meets Mary at the park with the intention of killing her and Walt, but Walt and the police arrive soon after and escort Buster, now a suspect, Walt and Mary back to Chick's house. Cora is there, drunk and despondent, and, recognizing Mary, reveals to the police that Mary was Chick's girl friend before she and Chick married. Under interrogation, Cora tells police where Rand is holding Chick. Meanwhile, at the hideout, Chick manages to lock the dog in the bathroom and escape out a window. Upon hearing the clatter, Rand and Meadows send the dog after Chick and then follow the dog's lead. They chase Chick to an abandoned fort. When Walt, Mary and the police arrive, Rand, hoping to pass himself off as Chick, takes off his coat and rolls up his shirtsleeves, mimicking Chick's appearance, then runs to the police, asserting that Chick is the imposter. The police charge ahead, leaving Rand with Mary. Meadows sees Rand, and mistaking him for Chick, sends the dog to kill him. After the dog chases Rand onto a parapet high above the ocean, Rand loses his balance and falls to his death. With Rand's demise, Chick reclaims his own identity and now free of Cora, happily reunites with Mary.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Release Date
Jan 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Jun 1951
Production Company
Edward F. Gardner Productions
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Fort Morro Castle,Puerto Rico; Puerto Rico--Fort Morro Castle,United States; Puerto Rico, United States; Puerto Rico
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Man with My Face by Samuel W. Taylor (London, 1948).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Film Length
6,941ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film opens and closes with voice-over narration by Barry Nelson as his character, "Chick Graham," who describes his daily life in Puerto Rico. Samuel W. Taylor's novel The Man with My Face was serialized in Liberty (Feb-July 1948). According a August 20, 1948 Hollywood Reporter news item, Thomas McGowan and Ernest Wolfe acquired the rights to the Taylor's story for independent production, but an April 11, 1950 Hollywood Reporter news item states that Jesse Smith Productions also optioned the story, and that producer Edward Gardner purchased the rights in 1950. Gardner was more commonly known as "Archie" on the popular, long-running radio program Duffy's Tavern. The film was shot entirely on location in Puerto Rico, with the closing scenes being shot at Fort Morro Castle. According to a August 28, 1950 Los Angeles Times article, all interiors were actual residents' homes and offices.