Ladyhawke


2h 1m 1985

Brief Synopsis

During medieval times, an evil bishop cast a spell on two lovers turning the woman into a hawk by day and the man into a wolf by night. The only person who can help undo it is a young petty thief.

Film Details

Also Known As
Lady Halcón, la femme de la nuit
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Synopsis

During medieval times an evil bishop cast a spell on two lovers--turning the woman into a hawk by day and the man into a wolf by night--and the only person who can help undo it is a young petty thief.

Crew

Giuseppe Alberti

Assistant Camera Operator

Dick Alexander

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Bud Alper

Sound

Elio Altamura

Property Master

Steve Altman

On-Set Dresser

Eros Baciucchi

Special Effects Assistant

Norman Baillie

Special Effects Technician

Stuart Baird

Editor

Stuart Baird

Unit Director

Ian Bairnson

Music

Bo Baker

Boom Operator

Paola Barbaglia

Camera

Maria Teresa Barbasso

Production Designer

Manuela Estrella Beeloo

Animal Trainer

Peter Bennet

Assistant Director

Harvey Bernhard

Executive Producer

Roberto Bessi

Assistant

John Brown

Special Effects Technician

Neil Burrows

Sound Editor

Giuseppe Butti

Production Assistant

Filippo Cafolla

Gaffer

Nello Cappelli

Propman

Mariangela Capuano

Production Designer

Roy Carnon

Concept Artist

Fratelli Cartocci

Transportation

Nando Cartucci

Transportation

Sergio Casadei

Animal Wrangler

Nana Cecchi

Costume Designer

Iole Cecchini

Hair Stylist

Richard Champa

Camera Operator

Gerry Ciantar

Special Effects Technician

Francesco Cinieri

Casting

Monica Ciprari

Stunts

Richard Cottle

Music

Ken Court

Art Director

Luisa Cutri

Production Secretary

Daniel Dark

Special Effects Technician

Gordon Davidson

Sound Editor

Ida De Guilmi

Hair Stylist

Alberto De Stefani

Cashier

Giancarlo Del Brocco

Makeup Artist

Carlo Del Marro

Accounting Assistant

Giorgio Devincenzo

Assistant Editor

Lucio Di Domenico

Production Designer

Bruna Percecchi Di Spirito

Caterer

Franco Di Tivoli

Driver

Peter Donen

Visual Effects Supervisor

Lauren Shuler Donner

Producer

Richard Donner

Producer

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Anthony Dunsterville

Special Effects Technician

Stuart Elliott

Music

Eugene T Escarrega

Assistant Editor

Mimi Everett

Titles And Opticals

Giuseppe Fatale

Props Buyer

Walter Fiordelmondo

Production Assistant

Maria Fiorito

Other

Seth Flaum

Assistant Editor

Les Fresholtz

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Roberto Gengarelli

Assistant Camera Operator

Gary Gero

Animal Trainer

Vincent Giordano

Camera Operator

Judith Goodman

Assistant

Richard Graydon

Stunt Coordinator

Richard Graydon

Other

Richard Alan Greenberg

Visual Effects Designer

Donald Harris

Music Editor

Bob Henderson

Supervising Sound Editor

Brooke Henderson

Assistant Sound Editor

William Hobbs

Stunt Coordinator

Joel Hynek

Titles And Opticals

Rita Innocenzi

Hair Assistant

Lynne Bell Kelser

Assistant

Ed Khmara

Screenplay

Ed Khmara

Story By

Karen Kovacevich

Assistant

Wolf Kroeger

Production Designer

Emilio Lari

Photography

Bill Lattanzi

Visual Effects Editor

Manolo Luppichini

Video

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Yevgeny Mamut

Camera Operator

Tom Mankiewicz

Consultant

Tom Mankiewicz

Screenplay

Alfredo Marchetti

Key Grip

Adriana Mattiozzi

Wardrobe

Matthew C. May

Assistant Sound Editor

Ennio Meloni

Construction

Sergio Mioni

Stunt Coordinator

Stefano Mioni

Stunts

Arnoldo Mogiani

Security

Elizabeth Bocciardo Montaldo

Wardrobe Assistant

Gerald Morin

Unit Manager

John Morris

Special Effects Technician

Robert Mrozowski

Animation Supervisor

Alan Robert Murray

Supervising Sound Editor

Gloria Mussetta

Wardrobe

Bernardino Nardoni

Construction Coordinator

Giovanni Natalucci

Art Director

Scott Nicholas

Camera Operator

Antonio Oondello

Driver

Ronald Oxley

Animal Trainer

Alan Parsons

Music Engineer

Alan Parsons

Music Producer

Dave Paton

Music

Larry Payne

Animal Trainer

Giuseppe Peruzzi

Wardrobe

Mark Pierce

Editor

Gina Pietralunga

Production Secretary

Mario Pisani

Production Manager

Adriano Pischiutta

Other

Vern Poore

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Andrew R Powell

Music

Andrew R Powell

Original Music

David Price

Assistant

Eric Prince

Music

Giuliano Principato

Production Assistant

Stefano Priori

Accounting Assistant

Aldo Proietti

Driver

Gilberto Provenghi

Makeup Artist

Dallas Puett

Assistant Editor

Marco Valerio Pugini

Office Runner

Angelo Ragusa

Stunts

Tony Richards

Music Engineer

John Richardson

Special Effects Supervisor

Stuart Robertson

Titles And Opticals

Rod Rogers

Assistant Sound Editor

Luciano Sacripanti

Assistant Director

Mauro Sacripanti

Assistant Director

Angelo Santucci

On-Set Dresser

Antonio Savini

Transportation Manager

Elaine Schreyeck

Script Supervisor

Mary Selway

Casting

Cheryl Shawver

Animal Trainer

Lauren Shuler Donner

Producer

Romolo Siani

Painter

Pasqualino Sindici

Wardrobe

Larry Singer

Adr Editor

Enzo Sisti

Accountant

Chet Slomka

Sound Editor

Catherine Smith

Assistant

Alan Snelling

Music Engineer

Aldo Spina

Assistant

Ildo Spina

Assistant

Marco Stefanelli

Stunts

Vittorio Storaro

Photography

James Szalapski

Visual Effects

Melanie Tanz

Assistant

Arthur Tarry

Production Accountant

Michael Thau

Assistant Editor

Michael Thomas

Screenplay

Alfredo Tiberi

Makeup Artist

Eric Tomlinson

Music Engineer

Jennie Lew Tugend

Assistant

Remo Ubertini

Driver

Enrico Umetelli

Camera Operator

Riccardo Umetelli

Camera

Joe Wallikas

Camera Operator

Anthony Waye

Assistant Director

Anthony Waye

Production Manager

Russ Woolenough

Assistant Editor

Jenny Wykes

Medic

Film Details

Also Known As
Lady Halcón, la femme de la nuit
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Award Nominations

Best Sound

1985

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1985

Articles

TCM Remembers - Leo McKern


TCM REMEMBERS LEO MCKERN, 1920-2002

The recent death of Leo McKern, 82, marked the passing of one of Britain's finest and most respected character actors. He was suffering from ill health in recent years and was moved to a nursing home a few weeks before his death on July 23 2002 in Bath, England. An actor of commanding presence with a deep-throated voice, the portly, bulbous-nosed McKern had a long, distinguished career spanning more than half a century, earning numerous plaudits along the way in all major mediums: theatre, film and television.

Born Reginald McKern on March 16, 1920 in Sydney, Australia; he served with the Australian Army during World War II and worked in regional theatre in his native Sydney before immigrating to England in 1946. It was a slow start, but after a three-year apprenticeship of painting scenery, stage-managing and acting, McKern eventually joined the celebrated Old Vic theatrical company in 1949 and proved one of the more versatile actors in the troupe tackling diverse roles in comedy, the classics and serious contemporary parts.

His film debut came in Murder in the Cathedral (1952) but it took a few years before he made his mark in cinema. Some of his best film work included roles as Peter Sellers' comic henchman in the classic satire The Mouse That Roared (1959); a bungling train robber in the charming Disney film The Horse Without a Head (1963); a nefarious professor who kills off his colleagues for amusement in the brilliant black comedy A Jolly Bad Fellow (1964); Clang, a cartoonish villain in the Beatles' pop film Help! (1965); Cromwell, the persecutor of Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons (1966) and as Thomas Ryan in the David Lean drama, Ryan's Daughter (1970).

Yet despite all the accolades McKern earned in theatre and films, it was television where he foundinternational fame as the wily, irascible barrister Horace P. Rumpole in John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey in 1975. Infusing the character with beguiling skill and energy, McKern made the acerbic, wine swilling, Tennyson-quoting Rumpole a much loved figure that was adored by critics, audiences and even its creator Mortimer. Perhaps Mortimer offered the most fitting tribute when he once referred to McKern - "His acting exists where I always hope my writing will be: about two feet above the ground, a little larger than life, but always taking off from reality." Enough said.

By Michael T. Toole KATY JURADO, 1924 - 2002

Katy Jurado, an Oscar nominee and major actress in Westerns, died July 5th at the age of 78. She was born in Guadalajara, Mexico on January 16th 1924 as Maria Cristina Estella Marcela Jurado Garcia, daughter of a cattle rancher and an opera singer. Jurado started to appear in Mexican films in 1943. After 15 films in her native country, director Budd Boetticher saw Jurado attending a bullfight (Jurado wrote about the subject for Mexican newspapers) and cast her in his Bullfighter and the Lady (1952), her Hollywood debut. For much of her career Jurado alternated between the two film industries. In the US, she was memorable for the sensual energy she brought to roles in High Noon (1952), One-Eyed Jacks (1961) which was directed by Marlon Brando, Sam Peckinpah's Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and John Huston's Under the Volcano (1984). She was nominated for an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for Broken Lance (1954). Jurado's Mexican films were in a broader range of genres and included Luis Bunuel's El Bruto (1952), Ismael Rodriguez's We the Poor and Miguel Littin's The Widow Montiel (1979). She won three Ariel Awards (Mexican equivalent to the Oscars) and one special award. She was married to Ernest Borgnine from the end of 1959 to summer 1963. One of her final films was The Hi-Lo Country (1998), a contemporary Western directed by Stephen Frears and co-starring Woody Harrelson, Billy Crudup and Penelope Cruz.

by Lang Thompson

DOLORES GRAY, 1924 - 2002

Broadway and nightclub star Dolores Gray died June 26th at the age of 78. Her movie career was brief but consisted of high-profile MGM musicals which guaranteed her a place in film history. Gray was born in Chicago on June 7th, 1924 (and where, according to a common story, she was accidentally shot by a gangster as a child and had a bullet in her lung her entire life). As a teenager she began singing in California until Rudy Vallee featured her on his radio show. Gray moved to Broadway in 1944 and then to the London stage in 1947, solidifying her reputation as a singer/actress while constantly giving the gossip columnists plenty to write about. She had two small singing roles in Lady for a Night (1941) and Mr. Skeffington (1944) but didn't really light up the big screen until It's Always Fair Weather (1955) even though Gray reportedly didn't much care for the role. Her rendition of "Thanks a Lot, But No Thanks," which has her gunning down a slew of male dancers on-stage and kicking them through trap doors, is a genuine showstopper. Three more unforgettable musical roles quickly followed: Kismet (1955), The Opposite Sex (1956, which Gray turned down Funny Face to do) and Designing Women (1957). That was it for Gray's film career. She kept busy with TV appearances (mostly singing though she did one 1988 episode of the cult show Dr. Who) and a busy recording and nightclub schedule. In 1987, she appeared in a British production of Follies at Stephen Sondheim's request.

by Lang Thompson

Tcm Remembers - Leo Mckern

TCM Remembers - Leo McKern

TCM REMEMBERS LEO MCKERN, 1920-2002 The recent death of Leo McKern, 82, marked the passing of one of Britain's finest and most respected character actors. He was suffering from ill health in recent years and was moved to a nursing home a few weeks before his death on July 23 2002 in Bath, England. An actor of commanding presence with a deep-throated voice, the portly, bulbous-nosed McKern had a long, distinguished career spanning more than half a century, earning numerous plaudits along the way in all major mediums: theatre, film and television. Born Reginald McKern on March 16, 1920 in Sydney, Australia; he served with the Australian Army during World War II and worked in regional theatre in his native Sydney before immigrating to England in 1946. It was a slow start, but after a three-year apprenticeship of painting scenery, stage-managing and acting, McKern eventually joined the celebrated Old Vic theatrical company in 1949 and proved one of the more versatile actors in the troupe tackling diverse roles in comedy, the classics and serious contemporary parts. His film debut came in Murder in the Cathedral (1952) but it took a few years before he made his mark in cinema. Some of his best film work included roles as Peter Sellers' comic henchman in the classic satire The Mouse That Roared (1959); a bungling train robber in the charming Disney film The Horse Without a Head (1963); a nefarious professor who kills off his colleagues for amusement in the brilliant black comedy A Jolly Bad Fellow (1964); Clang, a cartoonish villain in the Beatles' pop film Help! (1965); Cromwell, the persecutor of Sir Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons (1966) and as Thomas Ryan in the David Lean drama, Ryan's Daughter (1970). Yet despite all the accolades McKern earned in theatre and films, it was television where he foundinternational fame as the wily, irascible barrister Horace P. Rumpole in John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey in 1975. Infusing the character with beguiling skill and energy, McKern made the acerbic, wine swilling, Tennyson-quoting Rumpole a much loved figure that was adored by critics, audiences and even its creator Mortimer. Perhaps Mortimer offered the most fitting tribute when he once referred to McKern - "His acting exists where I always hope my writing will be: about two feet above the ground, a little larger than life, but always taking off from reality." Enough said. By Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring April 12, 1985

Released in USA on video

Released in United States Spring April 12, 1985